Posts tagged with "women’s health"

Donna Kalajian Lagani Joins Hearst Foundations

Hearst today announced that Donna Kalajian Lagani will join the Hearst Foundations after nearly 25 years at Hearst Magazines. Kalajian Lagani had been senior vice president and group publishing director of Hearst Magazines Young Women’s Group, encompassing CosmopolitanSeventeen and Women’s Health. The announcement was made by Hearst President and CEO Steven R. Swartz. Kalajian Lagani assumes her new role February 4. Her replacement at Hearst Magazines will be named shortly.

“Donna has done an outstanding job leading our flagship magazine brand for more than two decades, and I am thrilled that she has chosen to take the next step in her career journey at the Hearst Foundations,” Swartz said.

The Hearst Foundations are national philanthropic resources for organizations working in the fields of culture, education, health and social services. The Foundations identify and fund outstanding nonprofits to ensure that people of all backgrounds in the United States have the opportunity to build healthy, productive and inspiring lives. Created by William Randolph Hearst, the Foundations are independent, private philanthropies operating separately from Hearst. Since 1945, the Foundations have made over 20,000 grants totaling more than $1.1 billion. 

“Philanthropy is an important part of my life, and this is something I’ve always wanted to do,” Kalajian Lagani said. “I’ve had the absolute best job on the planet for more than two decades, overseeing Cosmopolitan, the most powerful young women’s media brand in the world, and more recently, adding SeventeenWomen’s Health and brand licensing to my purview. Now, after a ‘fun and fearless’ career generating revenue and profits, I feel truly blessed to work with the Foundations and its directors, Paul ‘Dino’ Dinovitz and George Irish. The Foundations’ grants profoundly change people’s lives, and I’m honored to join them to uphold the legacy of William Randolph Hearst and his philanthropic efforts.”   

In a joint statement, Dinovitz and Irish said, “We have known for some time of Donna’s interest in philanthropy and impacting lives for the better, and we’re pleased that she will be joining us, bringing her philanthropic interest and executive talent to the Foundations.”

Kalajian Lagani joined Hearst Magazines in 1995 as publisher of Cosmopolitan and was named publishing director in 1999. She added oversight of Seventeen in 2014 and of Women’s Health in 2018, following Hearst’s acquisition of Rodale. During her career at Cosmopolitan, Kalajian Lagani introduced groundbreaking initiatives, most recently through mobile and artificial intelligence technology. She developed and immortalized the “fun fearless female” mantra used by Cosmopolitan editions worldwide. During her tenure, she helped launch CosmoGIRL! and Cosmo for Latinas, and was a strong force in bringing Cosmopolitan to new platforms, including Snapchat and Sirius XM Radio. 

Kalajian Lagani conceived and produced a Cosmopolitan “takeover” of Times Square on New Year’s Eve in 2015 to celebrate the brand’s 50 birthday and developed the “Fun Fearless Life” conference in New York City to empower young women. She initiated a multi-year brand partnership with the USO and received the organization’s Distinguished Service Award in 2010. Kalajian Lagani also launched the $100,000 Cosmopolitan “Practice Safe Sun” research grant and was honored as a cosmetic industry leader at the prestigious DreamBall in 2005 for her support of the “Look Good Feel Better” program and the American Cancer Society.

Kalajian Lagani sits on the Board of Directors of Circle of Generosity and the Fragrance Foundation. 

Top Tips to Help Women Treat Carpal Tunnel

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, women are three times more likely to suffer from carpal tunnel syndrome than men, making even the most basic repetitive tasks like typing, using a computer, chopping vegetables and gardening painful. The associated pain or numbness in the hands and wrist that can radiate up the arm and hinder the ability to work is caused by the median or ulnar nerves in the wrist becoming compressed by repetitive motion. The good news is, the pain associated with carpel tunnel can be relieved without surgery. A good fitting wrist brace and a simple exercise, holding the arm out straight and flexing the hand at the wrist, can relieve the pressure on the nerve.

Testing for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

There are two definitive tests that physicians use to diagnose carpal tunnel: Tinel’s and Phalen’s.

 

  • The Tinel’s Test. If tapping on the underside of the wrist causes shooting pains in the hand, it is considered positive.
  • The Phalen’s Test. If the hands feel heavy, tingling, burning, or numb when holding both wrists in a back-to-back position in front of the body, with the wrists bent at 90 degrees for 90 seconds, it is considered positive.

 

Carpal tunnel is sometimes mistaken for thoracic outlet syndrome. The tightness, soreness and restrictions in the neck, shoulder, chest muscles and/or a slight shift in one of the ribs – often attributed to thoracic outlet syndrome – can actually result in symptoms much like carpal tunnel. The good news is that easing the symptoms of both carpal tunnel syndrome and thoracic outlet syndrome may be accomplished with a correctly fitting wrist support.

Wrists are not one-size-fits-all. Women’s wrists are, on average, 10 percent narrower than men’s, so it’s important their wrist support is made just for them. The Wellgate for Women Perfect Fit Wrist Support, for example, helps to ease the painful symptoms of carpal tunnel, tendonitis, arthritis and sprains by keeping the wrist in a neutral position to relieve pressure on the median and ulnar nerves during the day and at night.

The American Physical Therapy Association offers these tips for women to limit their chances of getting carpal tunnel syndrome:

  • Consider using a wrist brace at night and when playing sports to support the wrist in a neutral position.
  • Take frequent breaks from activities that require repetitive motion, even cooking tasks.
  • Move only your fingers and keep your wrists straight when typing.
  • When typing, make sure your spine is flush with the chair back, your shoulders are relaxed, and your feet are flat on the floor.
  • Keep your computer monitor at eye level.

 

Women should not just assume they have to live with pain.

 

About the Author

Dr. Holly Herman has been a physical therapist for more than 43 years, with a full-time private practice in Cambridge, MA. Dr. Herman provides expert care for women and men seeking careful, considerate diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic and other medical conditions. She is dedicated to training physical therapy and other healthcare professionals worldwide.

 

ATIYE

Atiye  was  born  on  the  22nd  of  November  in  Bremen. She was raised in West  Germany  by a  Turkish  father  and  Dutch mother  and  spent much of her  childhood  in  Germany,  the  Netherlands,  the  United  States  and  Turkey.   The  second  album  by  Atiye  was  self-titled  and  released  under  Sony  Music.  It  spawned  a  number  of  hits  for the  artist.  The  lead  single  “Muamma”  and  the  second  single  “Salla”  became  huge  hits  in  Turkey.  They  peaked  at respectively  No.5  and  No.3  at  the  official  Turkish  chart. Magazine  Covers  include:  ELLE,  Women’s Health,  Home  Style,  Avon and  People. In addition, she received the ELLE  Style Award for “Best  Dressed  Artist” and dubbed as the Best  “Turkish  Act”  at  the  MTV  Europe  Music Awards.