Posts tagged with "Wisconsin Tourism"

Ice Breaker ferry ride through Death’s Door

360 Magazine Culture Editor Tom Wilmer reports from Door County Wisconsin.

If you’re not familiar with Wisconsin, look at a map of the state and you’ll notice a jutting peninsula (locals fondly refer to the peninsula as Wisconsin’s thumb) on the eastern flank. That’s Door County; cradled on the western flank is Sturgeon Bay and legendary Green Bay.

Summertime is crazy-busy tourist time with vacationers from around the midwest who have a multi-generational fondness for the rural county.

It’s a rural paradise where cherry orchards remain king, but today family-owned wineries have also become part of the landscape, alongside the ever popular roadside farm stands.

 

Lautenbach’s Orchard Country Winery & Market in Fish Creek, Wisconsin–symbolizes Door County’s multi-generational family owned businesses. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

     Summertime rocks with legendary lakeside fish boils and  beachside barbecues with live music.

Legendary Fish Boil at Rowleys Bay Resort & Restaurant Ellison Bay, Wisconsin. Photo Credit Tom Wilmer

 

Rowleys Resort Ellison Bay, Wisconsin

Innkeeper at Rowleys Bay Resort Ellison Bay, Wisconsin shows off the end result of the fish boil. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

 

Fish Creek, Wisconsin

Sundowner barbecue and live music on the bay at Fish Creek, Wisconsin. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

 

Al Johnson's Swedish Restaurant

Around back–at Al Johnsons Swedish Restaurant in Sister Bay, Wisconsin. Actually they are legend for their goats who mow the restaurant’s sod-roof during the summer months–oh and they serve great food too! Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

If you’re based in a southern state or on the West Coast you might presume that come wintertime the locals in the Northern Tier states hunker down by the fireplace until the spring thaw.

 

Outdoor adventuring on Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin in the heart of Door County. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Come up for a visit in the midst of winter and you will see the locals just as busy playing and adventuring in the outdoors as they do in July or August.

 

Great fun to ride a vehicle across the bay to go ice fishing. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Cross Country skiing, snow shoeing, hiking, ice skating–and ice fishing are super popular winter activities. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crprEtOV-pI

Videographer Jason Lopez produced a 360 video featuring the Washington Island Ferry Service with Richard Purinton and Jon Jarosh from the Door County Visitor Bureau

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE KCBX/NPR One PODCAST about the Washington Island Ferry

End of the road-- Door County Peninsula

The northern end of the Door County Peninsula exhibits a distinctive, intoxicating beauty. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

A cool mid-winter adventure takes place at the northern end of the Door Peninsula–that’s where you board the ice-breaker ferry for a ride across the straits—dubbed long ago by pioneer adventurers Deaths’ Door.

The roots of the name stem from the potentially brutal and sometimes deadly experience when early settles traveled by boat between the peninsula and ports around Lake Michigan.

Washington Island Ferry wintertime

Washington Island Ferry. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Today the Washington Island Ferry transports locals and visitors every day of the year–shuttling passengers between the peninsula and nearby Washington Island.

The Washington Island Ferries are equipped with hardened ice-breaking bows that carve their way across the straits skirting the fringe of Green Bay and Lake Michigan. 

Death's Door Door County, Wisconsin

Crossing the straits of Death’s Door on the fringe of Lake Michigan en route to Washington Island. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Settled long ago by Norwegian and Icelandic pioneers, Washington Island remains populated by descendants of the first homesteaders (the island today claims a large population of Icelandic descendants)–of course along with a new generation of hardy souls, many attracted specifically because of its remoteness and unspoiled natural beauty.

Washington Island Stavkirke

Washington Island’s revered Norwegian Stavkirke (church of Staves) is based on drawings of a church in Borglund, Norway constructed in 1150 AD. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

A saving grace for the island’s pristine environment is that it has experienced minimal development and claims around 700 full-time residents, swelling to more than 1,500 during the summertime.

One of the big draws is a visit to one of the island lavender farms, and lunch at one of the local diners.

In addition to the natural beauty of Washington Island, and Door County, a precious attraction is the friendliness and welcoming attitude of the locals.

White Gull Inn Innkeeper with his woodie

Innkeeper at White Gull Inn shows off his classy ride. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

A stop at a coffee shop is an integral part of life year round on the Door Peninsula. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Fun with the locals at Rowleys Resort Ellison Bay, Wisconsin. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Jon Jarosh with the Door County Visitor Bureau. Photo Credit: Tom Wilmer

Wisconsin Osthoff Resort

Wisconsin

By Krishan Narsinghani

Wisconsin is known for their cheese and ice creams. A major food one may overlook is the Wisconsin cranberry. 360 Magazine had the opportunity to visit their tourism team for an exploration of lodging, dining, cranberry wonders and more.

The trip began at the Osthoff Resort at Elkhart Lake, a quaint fairytale land that makes a city kid feel free. The plot roots back to the age of the Potawatomi Native American Tribe, where the area still inhibits the same wholistic lifestyle. In 1885, the Osthoff Resort was built by Auto Osthoff and reimagined 100 years later to the four Diamond AAA rated majestic lodge guests see today. The 248 room boasts 1, 2, and 3-bedroom suites that fancy a kitchen (or kitchenette) and an individual private balcony. The grand hotel is the perfect family getaway, especially in the Summer. With a three-tear lake deck and Mirror Lake, there’s no disappointment when it comes to adult and kid-friendly activities.The deck includes a bar, live entertainment along with water sports open to guests and the public – aqua cycles, power boats, sailboats and pontoon cruises.

The resort offers a handful of different restaurants to try, Lola’s On The Lake being the choice for media on their first night. Lola’s infuses their dishes with fresh ingredients from the Osthoff Gardens that harvest over 11,000 pounds of produce including edible flowers available in 2019. It’s a farm to table atmosphere while the menu is consistently changes. 360’s personal favorite was the Rib Eye Steak Special with Potato Donuts. This mouth-watering meal introduced savory and sweet for new flavors that will wow your tastebuds.

360 Magazine enjoyed an afternoon cooking class inspired from their wellness menu that featured nutrient dense and natural sugar items. The foods prepared are purposely chosen so more guests with dietary restrictions can participate and indulge. Courses included a Lemon and Raspberry Chia Seed Pudding, Overnight Oats, Egg Shakshuka (Baked Eggs with Feta, Garden Tomato Sauce and Cilantro) and a Quinoa Salad with Halibut. The Shakshuka wafted aromatic Middle Eastern flavors that start your pallet off right and finishes with a taste of creamy tomato sauce and powerful spices.

Others enjoyed a natural spa and wellness treatment at Aspira, which translates to “infused with spirit.” Guests rejuvenate themselves through a variety of specials such as the meditation sanctuary that binds water from Elkhart Lake and hydrating cranberry facials.

In 1857, Wisconsin birthed Steven’s Point Brewery, the third-oldest independently owned and continuously operating brewhouse in the United States. The guided tour and tasting throughout the facility showcased new craft beers and history that withstood the Civil War, prohibition and The Great Depression. Their pilot brewing system has the capacity to make ten barrels of beer at one time essentially creating a microbrewery inside of a craft brewery. Enjoy a refreshing pineapple flavor, white chocolate stout or Octoberfest.

Ride along Cranberry Highway to Gottschalk Cranberry Marsh to witness a breathtaking sea of red fruits. Throughout the Fall season, visitors can drive around 50 miles of these beds from Wisconsin Rapids to Warrens. This antioxidant rich treat is grown on low running vines at bogs and later flooded with water. The berries float to the top and are harvested by picking machines. Local restaurants like Great Expectations (originally a fully women-owned business) incorporate these cranberries into nearly all their dishes. These partnerships make for signature items like their House-Made Ginger-Cranberry Moscow Mule and Unforgettable Grilled Cheese with Cran-Pepper Jam.

One of America’s favorite juices, Ocean Spray, is headquartered on a 70 acre manufacturing facility. Producing 3.6 millions gallons of concentrate a year, the company utilizes a complex system. Wisconsin will produce 5.9 million barrels of cranberries in 2018 making so called, “America’s Dairyland,” the nation’s No. 1 cranberry producer.

Overall, 360 left with a delightful taste and an aura revitalized. When visiting Wisconsin, come prepared with an empty stomach and an open mind for well-deserved Midwestern hospitality.

travelwisconsin.com

wiscran.org