Posts tagged with "vote"

THE WORLD’S 50 BEST RESTAURANTS

The World’s 50 Best Restaurants, sponsored by S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna, announces the 51-120 list of restaurants ahead of its annual awards ceremony, which takes place in one week’s time on Tuesday, 25th June 2019 at Marina Bay Sands in Singapore. For 2019 only, the list expands from 51-100 to 51-120 restaurants, in celebration of the 120th anniversary of S.Pellegrino, partner of the gastronomy community since the beginning of its history in 1899. Deloitte, a professional services consultancy, is again independently adjudicating the list that is compiled by a diverse voting Academy which comprises over 1,000 international chefs, food writers and traveling gastronomes.

The 51-120 list in numbers – developing diversity

  • The 51-120 boasts 21 new entries from 15 countries, marking a near 30% increase in new territories this year
  • The full 51-120 list includes restaurants in 25 countries across five continents, with four new countries joining the list
  • There are six re-entries from four countries: Denmark, Japan, France and South Africa
  • It’s been a fine year for Italy with three first-time entrants
  • The highest new entry on the 51-120 list at No.61 is Uliassi in Senigallia, Italy
  • Nobelhart & Schmutzig in Berlin, Germany rises an impressive 31 places from last year to No.57, with
    Indian Accent in New Delhi, India following in close second, advancing 30 positions to No.60
  • USA leads in volume with seven restaurants on the 51-120 list, including one new entry
  • Japan and Spain are hot on the heels of USA with six restaurants each, including four new listings

Female Forward
There is a strong female presence this year, most notably with an exciting new entry from Core by Clare Smyth in London (No.66), the restaurant led by the winner of The World’s Best Female Chef Award 2018. Other female-led restaurants include Elena Arzak’s Arzak in San Sebastian, Spain (No.53), Pim Techamuanvivit’s Nahm in Bangkok, Thailand (No.69), Helena Rizzo’s Maní in São Paulo, Brazil (No.73),Garima Arora’s Gaa in Bangkok, Thailand (No.95) and Anne-Sophie Pic’s eponymous restaurant in Valence, France (No.98).

50/50 Split
As a result of the gender-balanced voting Academy announced in early 2019, more than 500 female experts, chefs, food writers and restaurateurs, make up 50% of the total voting Academy, establishing equal representation within the group of 1,000-plus international restaurant industry experts.

Widening the net
Some less celebrated gastronomic locations now appear on the 51-120 list, including the Marche region in Italy with Uliassi (No.61); southern Spain’s Aponiente (No.94) in El Puerto de Santa Maria; Guadalajara in Mexico with Alcalde (No.109); Ghent in Belgium with Chambre Séparée (No.111); and the Dolomites in Italy with St. Hubertus (No.116).

William Drew, Director of Content of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants, comments: “This year’s 51-120 listmarks the most expansive representation of geographic diversity we’ve seen during the 18 years that 50 Best has been celebrating culinary excellence. Restaurants from world-renowned countries as well as lesser-known destinations are voted for and will be acknowledged at The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards in Singapore on 25th June. The advent of S.Pellegrino’s landmark anniversary marked the ideal opportunity for us to extend the list for one year only. We hope to see as many of them as possible again next year.”

In a collection of restaurants marked by their geographic spread, 21 new entries appear on this year’s 51-120 list of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants, marking a notable increase of represented countries and cities compared to previous years. There are three new entries apiece for Japan, Italy and China (including two from Hong Kong and one from Macau). Russia sees two new entries, both from St. Petersburg, challenging what has previously been Moscow’s domination. Lido 84 on Lake Garda, Italy (No.78) – this year’s winner of the Miele One To Watch Award – is another significant newcomer to the list, alongside Uliassi, which is the highest new entry in the 51-120 list.

Berlin’s Nobelhart & Schmutzig, last year’s No.88, has climbed the ranking an impressive 31 places to No.57, followed by Indian Accent in New Delhi, which advanced 30 places from last year to No.60.

SingleThread of Healdsburg, USA, last year’s Miele One To Watch winner, continues to demonstrate its predicted progress to No.71, jumping 21 places. Other notable climbers include Rio de Janeiro’s Lasai,bumping up 26 places to No.74, and Diverxo of Madrid landing at No.75 from No.96.
USA boasts an impressive seven restaurants on the 51-120 list, with Atomix, New York, debuting at No.119. Spain and Japan closely follow with six restaurants each, and Denmark, France, Germany, Italy and the UK are each represented by four restaurants.

The Voting Process
The World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2019 list is voted for by more than 1,000 international restaurant industry experts and well-travelled gourmets who make up The World’s 50 Best Restaurants Academy. The gender- balanced Academy comprises 26 separate regions around the world, each of which has 40 members including a chairperson. No sponsor from the event has any influence over the voting process. Professional services consultancy, Deloitte, independently adjudicates the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list. This adjudication ensures that the integrity and authenticity of the voting process and the resulting list of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2019 are protected.

Results
The best way to follow the announcement of the list and individual awards is via our social media channels:

New Mueller Report Poll

NEW MUELLER REPORT POLL: Voters Satisfied with Investigation, Divided on Next Steps

 

(Palo Alto, California) – Change Research released a new poll today showing that voters are largely satisfied with the Mueller investigation, but they are much more divided on what should happen next.

 

The poll was conducted from April 18th-19th immediately following the public release of the Mueller report to the public. The highlights include:

 

Voters are satisfied with the investigation.

Overall, voters felt that the investigation was:

  • Necessary52% say it was an “important investigation into a foreign government’s attempts to interfere with our elections”
    • 43% say it was a “politically motivated witch hunt from the start”
  • Fair: 58% say the investigation was conducted fairly
    • 26% say it was conducted unfairly
    • 51% say President Trump was treated fairly
      • 40% say he was treated unfairly
  • Impartial: 63% say Mueller was not biased toward either party
  • Accurate: 57% say it was an “accurate summary of whether there was coordination between Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and the Russian government”
    • Only 14% say it was an inaccurate summary
  • In addition: Two-thirds of voters (68%) believe that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election

 

Voters are divided on the next steps following the report.

  • 61% of voters feel that Mueller should be called to testify before Congress
  • 50% feel that Barr should be called to testify
  • 53% of voters say that Trump should not be impeached
    •  47% say that he should be
  • 44% of voters believe that Trump was exonerated by the report’s findings,
    • 42% believe that he was not

 

Trump’s re-election prospects are dimming.

  • Over half of voters (53%) say they would “definitely” vote for someone else besides Trump if the 2020 general election were held today
    • 42% say they would vote to re-elect him
    • 9% of previous Trump voters are either willing to consider a different candidate or will definitely vote for someone else
  • When asked how they feel about Trump on a scale of 1-10, where 1 means they strongly oppose him and 10 means they strongly support him:
    • 50% of voters selected 1, strongly oppose
    • 32% of voters selected 10, strongly support
    • 54% selected 1-4, oppose
    • 45% selected 6-10, support

 

Click here to read more about the survey findings.

360 MAGAZINE, Reebok, r58, complexcon

ComplexCon 2018

By Krishan Narsinghani

For the third annual year, ComplexCon takes over the greater LA area. Set in Long Beach, California, major brands and celebrities flooded their convention center to witness spectacular musical acts, speakers, brands and art. Over the two days, 360 Magazine visited various booths – Puma, Champion, Reebok, Pink Dolphin, 1800 Tequila, Cadillac and more. Reebok’s exclusive ComplexCon shoe, the R58 stunted vibrant colors and introduced all three logos shown for the first time.

Takashi Murakami, contemporary artist on the host committee, sprinkled his aesthetics across the summit (in addition to a collaboration with Drake’s OVO). 1800 Tequila partnered with artist Adam Lucas and streetwear designer Nicky Diamonds for custom-made vintage denim jackets which were raffled at this year’s program. Attendees waiting in line for the McDonald’s installation were treated with Mcnuggets and fries before choosing patches to press onto free backpacks and shirts.

Recording artist Tinashe was a 360 favorite. The urban singer performed hits “Company” and “2 On.” Other performances included Lil Baby, Nav and T-Pain while the crowd also bopped to headliners Rae Sremmurd and Future. Duo Sremmurd surprised fans with a special appearance from rapper Tyga.

ComplexCon(versations) topics revolved around today’s thought on politics, culture, fashion and music. Billboard producer of the decade, Pharrell Williams was a host due to his creative sense on the latest pop culture trends. Tommy Hilfiger spoke on his relationships with Hip-Hop and the connections between music and fashion. Jaden Smith and Yara Shahidi discussed growth out of chaos and how youth should address political issues. Rapper and icon, Nas, spoke on the behind-the-scenes of film, “Belly” and how it changed Hip-Hop and Hollywood.

TRIGGER WARNING: New Kavanaugh Video

***WARNING: This video is a dramatization of alleged events. It contains violent images that may be disturbing to some viewers. Caution is strongly advised.***

WATCH THE AGENDA PROJECT’S NEW VIDEO: TRIGGER WARNING

The Agenda Project released a new video featuring a dramatization of the alleged attempted rape several years ago by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh as described by Dr. Christine Blasey Ford. As the text above warns, the footage may be disturbing for some. This is a delicate subject matter for many, but with the future of our nation at stake, we felt this video was an important one to make. If you feel up to it, we encourage you to watch, then act.

The video ends by providing the number to the US Senate switchboard. If you are as outraged as we are that a man credibly accused of attempted rape is being considered for a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court, please take a minute to call your Senators and demand that they vote against confirming Kavanaugh.

The video was released in conjunction with a piece written by Agenda Project Founder Erica Payne explaining the rationale behind putting out such potentially disturbing footage. In it, she writes:

“Senator Dean Heller called it “a little hiccup.” For Senator Lindsay Graham, it was “a smear.” The Honorable Orrin Hatch said, “This woman, whoever she is, is mixed up.” The X chromosome knows exactly what the Y chromosome means when it says things like that. It means we are nothing. Our claims to our bodies are NOTHING. Like a little hiccup, we will pass.

So it’s come to this. To showing them – showing as many men who have and would do this, and the ones who dismiss it when it’s done – what we’re actually talking about here.”

For more information on why we felt this video was so important for us to release, you can read more in the rest of her article HERE

Moving to a New State With a Car? Here Are 7 Tips to Have a Smooth Transition

According to the American Moving & Storage Association, 11.2% of Americans moved in 2015-2016. That comes out to 35.1 million, or 15.3 million households with 2.3 persons per household. If you’ve ever moved, you know how hectic it can be: packing, unpacking, and getting settled in. It can be even more stressful when you’re moving to an entirely new state. On top of moving and getting acquainted with your new home, you also have to apply for a new driver’s license, update your auto insurance, and register your vehicle. You also need to know when to renew your driver’s license in your new state. To help make the transition as smooth as possible, here are seven tips you should know when moving to a new state.

1. Find Your New State’s DMV. If you move to a new state, you must apply for a new driver’s license. Most states require you to apply for a new license within 30 days of becoming a resident. If you are a student, however, you most likely do not have to apply for a license in the state where your college or university is located because you’re not considered a resident. Because you’re a new resident, the state will probably require you to visit the DMV in person. To save yourself time, you can go online and find your local DMV branch. There, you can locate basic information, including the address, office hours, services offered, how many days you have to apply for a driver’s license, when you’ll need to renew your license, and what documents you’ll need to apply for a new license. To save you even more time, some states, such as Washington allow you to pre-apply for a driver’s license online.

2. Apply for a New License. Once you’ve found your local DMV, you’ll need to apply for a new license. In most cases, this is a simple trip to the DMV where you have your picture taken and pay a small fee, as long as you have the following.

  • Your valid out-of-state license that contains a picture. If your license is suspended or revoked in another state, you can not apply for a new driver’s license
  • Your Social Security Number
  • Proof of residency (a utility bill or bank statement)

Some states also require that you take a vision test or written exam on state driving laws. Again, visit your state’s DMV website to find out the exact documents andrequirements you need to obtain a new driver’s license.

3. Register Your Vehicle in Your New State. While you’re at the DMV, you might as well go ahead and register your vehicle in your new state. If you own your vehicle, this shouldn’t be a hassle. Simply bring your title and proof of insurance, and pay a small fee. Other states do require that your vehicle pass an emissions test and vehicle safety inspection.
If you’re financing or leasing a vehicle, this can be a little more complicated since you don’t have the title. In this case, you need to contact your lender and ask them to mail the title to your local DMV. After they register your vehicle, the DMV will mail the title back. Because each state has different laws, visit your state’s DMV website to locate the specific process for registering your vehicle.

4. Update Your Auto Insurance Policy. Insurance requirements vary from state-to-state. Most require you to have minimum coverage, while some allow you to pay an uninsured motorist fee. Regardless of the exact laws, if you want to avoid any financial or legal repercussions, make sure to call your current insurance company to update your policy. Your insurance company should be able to connect you to an agent licensed in your state to help you determine the right policy you’ll need.

5. Register to Vote. If you want to participate in elections your new home area, you’ll need to register to vote. Thankfully, when you’re at the DMV, you can also register to vote in your new state.

6. Surrender Your License Plates. When moving to a new state, your previous state might require you to surrender your license plates. You can do this by dropping them off at the DMV or mailing them back to the DMV. This ensures that you don’t have to pay extra in property taxes. In some situations, you might also be able to receive a refund for any overpaid taxes and registration fees, but you’ll need to contact your county clerk to handle the matter.

7. Renew Your Driver’s License in Your New State. Now that you have your new license, the driver’s license renewal process in your new state is fairly straightforward as long as don’t let your license expire or have it suspended.
Depending on the state, your new license will be valid for 4 to 8 years. If you aren’t sure of the exact date, you don’t need to panic because you’ll receive a renewal notice in the mail. After you’ve received the notice, you have the option to renew your driver’s license in person, by mail, or online by providing the same documents you used to apply for your new license. If you’re in the military and stationed out of state, you can renew your license by phone or by asking for an Extension of License for Person in Armed Forces card. And, don’t forget to have a credit or debit card or check to pay the driver’s license renewal fee. The amount varies from state to state, but your renewal notice should state the amount you owe. If not, contact your state’s DMV.

For more info visit https://www.moving.org/newsroom/data-research/about-our-industry/

The Economist x Midterms

Today The Economist launched its first real-time midterm model, which uses statistical forecasting to predict how many seats in the House of Representatives each party is likely to win in this year’s US midterm elections.

View the model here:

Applying cutting-edge machine-learning techniques to political science, the model combines information from polling, past elections, special elections, fundraising, ideology and “fundamental” factors like the economy and incumbency.  It has been trained on every election cycle since 1942 and nearly 6,500 historical district races. The model will conduct 4.35 million simulated elections every day until the vote, live-updating to incorporate up-to-the-minute data.

The Economist’s midterm model currently predicts that Democrats have a 2 in 3 (or 65%) chance of taking the House, and holding an average of 222 seats, or 4 more than is needed for a majority.  It shows that there is a 95% chance that the Democrats will hold between 206 and 241 seats.

The Economist’s data team plans to launch a similar model to forecast Senate results later in the year once primaries are complete and more polls become available.

Find out more about The Economist’s midterm model here.