Posts tagged with "town"

Suisun Valley, Fairfield

Story by Susan Hiland provided by Daily Republic

Suisun Valley greeted a group of out-of-town travel writers with a bounty of beauty, food and wine over the weekend.

They toured just about every winery, olive oil factory, candy-making company and barley brew-maker in the area.

This was the result of the Fairfield Conference & Visitors Bureau reaching out to Geiger & Associates, which has put together these travel tours for several communities including Lodi.

“This is the first time we have done something like this,” said Anand Patel, president/CEO of Visit Fairfield. “The goal was to get people thinking about Fairfield and Suisun Valley.”

He said he hoped that the travel writers would see the beauty of the valley and share that with their readers. The writers came from Portland, Oregon, Southern California, Northern California and even Quebec, Canada.

“We hope people read their articles and get interested in the valley,” he said.

The group of writers included Susan G. Hauser, Elyse Glickman, Vaughn Lowery, Wendy van Diver, Cortney Erndt, Carla Waldemar, Ruksana Hussain, Wendy Lemlin, Janet Boileau and Robin Raven.

The writers arrived Thursday and enjoyed an afternoon at Jelly Belly Candy Co., where they took the tour, sampled sweet treats and shopped.

“Every single stop we hope they learn something new,” Patel said.

Boileau, a writer and publisher for Taste and Travel International Magazine, which is a culinary publication with 20,000 subscribers across Canada, had no idea about Suisun Valley.

“I didn’t know what to expect,” she said. “But this is a very impressive part of the wine country.”

She was enjoying how relaxing the area was with some wine from Suisun Valley Wine Co-op along Pleasants Valley Road. The stop offered an opportunity for everyone to sample a variety of wines from the area in one place.

Lowery is the president of 360 Magazine, a lifestyle magazine that goes out to thousands of subscribers from Los Angeles to Japan.

“Anyone visiting here needs to stop at Il Fiorello Olive Oil Co.,” he said. “It was a sensory overload.”

They sampled a meal with each of the foods having been created using produce from the company’s garden.

“This is a great cross of Napa and Sonoma,” Lowery said. “It’s a place you can take time out and is very drivable.”

He said he was envisioning himself returning with a convertible, rolling the top down and just cruising through the back roads as a vacation.

“We tasted the grapes at Wooden Valley Winery. They were so sweet, I thought no way that was real,” he said.

“Fairfield is just a great town for a great road trip,” he said.

Cleanup of Contaminated Soil and Sediment

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced that cleanup work will begin this summer to address soil and sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at the Dewey Loeffel Landfill Superfund site in the town of Nassau, N.Y. The General Electric Company (GE) will remove contaminated soil and sediment, replace it with clean backfill, restore the stream channel, and re-plant trees and shrubs. The work will begin this summer and will be completed this fall.

“Superfund is at the very core of EPA’s mission and this important cleanup work will address one potential source of contamination at the Dewey Loeffel site,” said EPA Regional Administrator Pete Lopez. “EPA is working closely with the community and is expanding its efforts to involve stakeholders as we advance this cleanup forward working closely with our state and local government partners.”

EPA will hold a public information session on July 17 in Nassau to provide an overview of the recently completed field investigation activities and the upcoming cleanup. EPA will also discuss the opportunity for the formation of a community advisory group (CAG) for the site. A CAG is made up of members of the community and is designed to serve as the focal point for the exchange of information among the local community and EPA, the state regulatory agency, and other pertinent federal agencies involved in cleanup of the Superfund site.

A public information session will begin at 6:00 p.m., with a formal presentation beginning at 7:00 p.m. Members of the project team will be available to answer questions about current and planned project activities.

Public Information Session:

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Open House: 6 – 7 p.m., Presentation: 7 p.m.

St. Mary’s Church

Parish Hall (behind the church)

26 Church Street, Nassau, N.Y.

Background:

The stream to be addressed, technically known as Tributary T11A, is a 1,900-foot stream which flows into the Valatie Kill. The sediment and adjacent shoreline soil of Tributary T11A is contaminated with elevated levels of PCBs, which serve as a potential ongoing source of contamination to downstream areas, such as Nassau Lake. In September 2017, the EPA, working with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), reached an agreement with GE to conduct the T11A cleanup.

Between 1952 and 1968, an estimated 46,000 tons of industrial waste material generated by several Capital District companies was sent to the Dewey Loeffel Landfill site. The waste included industrial solvents, waste oil, PCBs, scrap materials, sludge and solids. From 1980 until the site was added to the federal Superfund list in 2011, numerous investigations and cleanup actions were performed at the site by GE and the NYSDEC. The cleanup work in Tributary T11A is an immediate action that is being taken to address contaminated soil and sediment in the tributary while the EPA’s long-term comprehensive study of the site continues.

For more information about the Dewey Loeffel Landfill Superfund Site, please visit www.epa.gov/superfund/dewey-loeffel-landfill.

Follow EPA Region 2 on Twitter at http://twitter.com/eparegion2 and visit our Facebook page, http://facebook.com/eparegion2.

GRINGO IN GRANADA

Gringo in Granada

By Robert Grant

Parque Central is the perfect inception to your exploration of Granada on a summer day. To stand here is to truly be transported back in time. As one of the oldest European settled cities in the Americas, the remnants of the colonialist era endure here brushed in a palette that seemingly exploded from an artist’s wildest imagination. The square, encased by Spanish-style churches and government buildings is a busy place. Horse-drawn carriages line the perimeter awaiting tourists to hire them and vendors fill the center offering a bit of the place to take home.

Old meets new in Granada. A quick stroll down the avenues will expose you to the beautiful provincial architecture whose brilliance is not lost by the splash of color that the locals have introduced. The vibrance of the city is best experienced on foot and you’ll easily fall in love with this bike-friendly town.

Like most of Nicaragua, the city of Granada is surrounded by lakes and volcanoes offering a real treat for the adventurer in you. After grabbing a bite near the square (plenty of eateries nearby) take a tour using one of the local services. If you haven’t booked an itinerary beforehand, most restaurant and shop owners can point you in the direction of a tour agency. Leo Tours comes highly recommended and takes groups to Las Isletas de Granada (Islets of Granada) and the nearby volcano Mombacho. If you’re touring the volcano it’s advised to arrive early in the morning (around 5 am) as this is an option that consumes an entire day.

The trek to Las Isletas begins with a bike ride from the city to the nearby port from which you can board a motor boat or kayak to traverse the waters of Lake Nicaragua. Wear comfy shoes and be sure to pack a bathing suit as things are soon to get a little wet and wild. Leo tours offers both bilingual and Spanish guides -depending on your proficiency- who will help you navigate the lake and provide tons of historic information.

The best way to experience the beauty and tranquility of Las Isletas is to go via kayak. If you haven’t kayaked before be advised that this tour is not for the faint of heart. There are no rapids, but lake Nicaragua is a massive lake-the 2nd largest in Central America and 19th in the world- that reaches depths of 85 ft. The tour itself takes about 3 1/2 hours with 2 1/2 of that spent on the water.  Once underway you’ll sail past some of the most beautiful wildlife and flora you’ve ever seen. Formed by the eruption of nearby Mombacho thousands of years ago, the islets are numerous are very unique ecologically. Various species of birds and particularly monkeys can be seen here before arriving at the famous isla de mono (monkey island). The islets on the periphery of the lake are also home to many wealthy Nicaraguans. Former presidents, executives and foreign diplomats take residence in the many mansions that line the path.

A good guide will make this tour very memorable for you and take great photos while giving you lots of information. If you opt to take the tour later in the day (last leaves at 2:30 pm) it’s the ideal time to enjoy the sunset on the lake.

Your visit to Nicaragua is not complete without a stop in Granada, the crown jewel of this volcanic nation. A less known oasis is quickly becoming a well known tourist attraction. For a stop a that’s affordable and gringo friendly, look no further.