Posts tagged with "the untitled space"

Jeanette Hayes, The Untitled Space, 360 MAGAZINE

Jeanette Hayes

The Untitled Space
presents
 
(hot girl) summer featuring (hot girl) summer art by Jeanette Hayes
A SOLO EXHIBITION
Curated by Indira Cesarine

CLOSING RECEPTION
August 13th
6-8pm
THE UNTITLED SPACE
45 Lispenard Street 
NYC 10013

RSVP 
events@untitled-space.com

Jeanette Hayes (b. 1988) is a painter/multimedia artist based in New York. Originally from Chicago, Hayes moved to NYC and received a BFA from Pratt Institute. Her work addresses the traditional preservation of non-traditional technological and pop imagery through painting, video, digital manipulation, and Internet collages. Hayes’ interests include cultural phenomena and the confrontation of conventionality and subject matter. Her fascination with the amalgamation of images we each navigate through everyday and their correlations to civilization and ownership in 2019 has propelled her practice. With international solo shows in Sweden, Italy and Belgium, Hayes has also shown in New York Hayes at Half Gallery, the Hole, Regina Rex, Castor Gallery, Romeo, Bleecker Street Arts Club, the National Arts Club and more.

Most recently, Hayes was curated by the Culture Corps to create a public art installation at Hudson Yards, which is currently on view until November, 2019. Jeanette Hayes has made animated GIFs and videos for Proenza Schouler, CHANEL, Alexander Wang, Cynthia Rowley, Vogue and Opening Ceremony. She has received artist sponsorships from BlackBerry and Blick Art and was chosen by Purple magazine to create their artist book in 2016, which she titled “five”. Hayes has been featured in the New York Times, Vogue Japan, i-D, Complex Magazine, Interview Magazine, Dazed, the Coveteur, Purple Magazine, Paper Magazine, Playboy and TimeOut New York chose Hayes as one of the “5 most important new artists in New York City.” Jeanette Hayes lives and works in New York City.

SARAH MAPLE × “THOUGHTS AND PRAYERS”

SARAH MAPLE, “THOUGHTS AND PRAYERS” 

A Solo Exhibition Curated by Indira Cesarine

OPENING RECEPTION January 22 // 6pm-9pm 

EXHIBITION ON VIEW January 22 – February 3, 2019

THE UNTITLED SPACE 

45 Lispenard Street Unit 1W 

NYC 10013 

The Untitled Space gallery is pleased to present “Thoughts and Prayers” a solo exhibition of works by artist Sarah Maple, curated by gallery director Indira Cesarine, opening January 22, 2019, and on view through February 3, 2019. Sarah Maple is an award-winning visual artist known for her bold, brave, mischievous and occasionally controversial artworks that challenge notions of identity, religion and the status quo. Hailing from Britain, this will be the first solo exhibition of the artist in the United States. Much of Maple’s inspiration originates from being raised Muslim, with parents of mixed religious and cultural backgrounds. “Thoughts and Prayers” will feature many new works, as well as a selection of some of her most notable past works, exploring a wide variety of media including performance, painting, photography, sculpture, collage, installation, and video. Maple’s pro-feminist artwork provokes a dialogue with her sharp humor and satirical eye. She fearlessly addresses what it means to be a Muslim in the Western world. Her taboo-breaking artwork fights against censorship as she investigates themes of politics, violence, freedom, feminism, and the ironies of pop culture. She often employs self-portraiture as a vehicle for her narrative, or engages guerrilla-style performance as a means to convey her message. 

“Using her own image, and drawing on her experience as a Muslim woman, Sarah tackles society’s many taboos, elevating those previously oppressed, and giving voice to those long since silenced.”   i-D Vice 

“Maple has made a name for herself over the years for pushing the boundaries of femininity, and for publicly discussing the convergence of her dual-Muslim heritage with feminism. Rather than crumble, Maple has an impressive resolve in the face of cyber adversity: she tries to laugh instead of cry… Maple hopes to examine where freedom of speech ends and abuse begins.” – Dazed Digital

“Maple could well be the only artist to take on the Kardashians (with her ‘Keeping Up With The Kapulets’ show), stereotypes around Islam (with her ‘I Love Orgasms’ acrylic), and the taboos around menstruation (with her ‘Menstruate With Pride’ triptych). She has received a flurry of glowing reviews – and even more death threats.” – Good Trouble 

“I think we need to be challenged, we need to hear challenging, radical, provocative things, even if we don’t agree with them, as it’s those things that make us react and make us want to bring about change…” Sarah Maple for TEDx

Sarah Maple graduated with BA in Fine Art from Kingston University London in 2007 and in the same year won The Saatchi Gallery’s “4 New Sensations” award for emerging artists. Maple’s artwork, film, and performances have been exhibited internationally at galleries and institutions including Tate Britain, The Barbican, AIR Gallery, and The New Art Exchange, among many others. Maple’s work has been the subject of documentaries including for ARTE and VPRO. In 2015 she released her first book “You Could Have Done This,” a hardback of selected works. The same year she was awarded a Sky Academy Arts scholarship from Sky Arts, which included funding, mentoring and a Sky Arts documentary. In 2017 she gave a TEDx talk in Birmingham, UK on the importance of free speech, titled “The Freedom To Be Challenged.” 

Her work has been featured in numerous international publications, including Vogue, The Guardian, i-D Magazine, The Sunday Times UK, The Independent, People Magazine, Dazed, and the Huffington Post among many others. In 2018 she was invited to make a limited edition cover for Harper’s Bazaar’s art issue alongside artists including Yayoi Kusama, Barbara Kruger, and Linder Sterling. Her artwork is in collections including Soho House, The Hyman Collection and the Ned. Sarah lives and works in Sussex, England. 

ARTIST STATEMENT

“My work is largely motivated by my upbringing as well as my interest in activism and gender politics. Citing current affairs I create works that provoke the viewer through satirical, tongue-in-cheek commentary. My mother is a Muslim from Kenya, who married my British father in the 1970s. She raised me as a Muslim in the UK and sent my siblings and I to a Catholic school. Much of my work examines the duality of my multicultural upbringing and the conflict of identity among young Muslims living in the western world. I began to explore these themes after reflecting on Muslim identity in Britain post 9/11and7/7 and the impact of the Iraq war. Motivated by the current political climate and being from an immigrant background, these subjects are close to my heart as I question notions of identity, belonging, and “otherness” in my works.  

I see many parallels between the UK and the US, especially with Brexit and the Trump election. The gun debate is something especially intriguing to the British. The threat of terror is continually focused on and yet nothing is done about gun laws. When officials offer up “Thoughts And Prayers,” it appears hollow and insincere. I am interested in how a lack of action directly and/or indirectly inflicts suffering and potential violence on its citizens. 

Also inspired by feminism and gender politics, my work aims to challenge deep-seated ideas about what it means to be a woman. I am interested in the role shame plays in women’s lives – how we take up space in the world, our physical appearance, bodily functions and “blame culture.” I explore the ways we can change the visual narrative for women as a form of empowerment. The medium I choose is determined by the strongest way to deliver my message; hence it is constantly evolving across a wide variety of media. Self-portraiture, for example, offers the possibility of taking ownership of our image. When we photograph ourselves, we have complete control over how we want our selves, our gender, our femininity, and our sexuality to be perceived by others. Humor is also an important element in my work. I often use a “Trojan horse” to get my message across and sometimes I just like to point out the obvious as this can be the most direct way to highlight how ridiculous something is. I used to accept a lot at face value but when I discovered feminism it motivated me not only to question the role of women, but also the preconceived ideas relating to all things in society.” – Artist Sarah Maple 

ABOUT THE UNTITLED SPACE:

The Untitled Space is an art gallery located in Tribeca, New York in a landmark building on Lispenard Street. Founded in 2014 by Indira Cesarine, the gallery features an ongoing curation of exhibits of emerging and established contemporary artists exploring conceptual framework and boundary pushing ideology through mediums of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video and performance art. The gallery is committing to exploring new ideas vis-à-vis traditional and new mediums and highlights a program of “Women in Art” as well as special events aligned with our creative vision. 

Exhibition Contacts:

The Untitled Space info@untitled-space.com 

Website link: http://untitled-space.com/sarah-maple-thoughts-and-prayers/

The Untitled Space

The Untitled Space × Defining Form

DEFINING FORM
A Group Show of Sculpture Curated by Indira Cesarine

RECEPTION: July 11, 2018
VIP + PRESS PREVIEW (by invitation) 4pm – 6pm //
OPENING RECEPTION 6pm – 9pm

EXHIBITION ON VIEW
July 11, 2018 – August 1, 2018

THE UNTITLED SPACE

45 Lispenard Street Unit 1W New York, NY 10013

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “DEFINING FORM,” a group exhibition of contemporary artists exploring 2 and 3-dimensional sculpture opening on July 11, 2018 and on view through August 1st, 2018. Curated by Indira Cesarine, “DEFINING FORM” takes a comprehensive look at the manifestations of contemporary sculpture today, engaging a dialogue of the narratives resonating amongst sculptors through works in mediums such as metal, stone, clay, wood, glass, textiles, recycled and repurposed materials, as well as mixed media.

DEFINING FORM presents figurative and abstract works by over 50 emerging and established artists. The group show investigates progressive themes in sculpture, including contemporary feminism, gender identity and political art, as well as new technologies in digital sculpture, with an emphasis on originality and innovative usage of materials. Technological advances in fabrication and digital sculpture have had a massive impact on the art form over the past few decades. Classic techniques such as chiseling stone and casting in bronze have shifted towards new technologies such as 3-D printing, materials such as silicone, plastics, and textiles as well as found, recycled and re-purposed materials. The domination of large-scale works has given way to delicate and intimate pieces as well as a wave of sculptural installations that deconstruct notions of space and form. Artists are pushing the boundaries of the art form integrating components of sound, video, light and performance as well as painting, photography and other mediums.

As the art form evolves in new directions with the impact of contemporary culture, it has transcended from the conventional portrait to works that challenge the status quo, address gender identity and racial stereotypes, LGBTQ ideologies and queer constructs, explore themes of the resistance movement as well as progressive feminist narratives and activism. Exhibit DEFINING FORM presents the new narrative of sculpture with works that interrogate ideologies of the art form, pushing forward experimental works that engage all of our senses and ignite fresh dialogues.

EXHIBITING ARTISTS

Alexandra Rubinstein, Andres Bardales, Ann Lewis, Arlene Rush, Barb Smith, Christina Massey, Colin Radcliffe, Cristin Millett, Daria Zhest, Desire Rebecca Moheb, Dévi Loftus, Elektra KB, Elizabeth Riley, Emily Elliott, Gracelee Lawrence, Hazy Mae, Indira Cesarine, Jackie Branson, Jamia Weir, Jasmine Murell, Jen Dwyer, Jennifer Garcia, Jess DeWahls, Jocelyn Braxton Armstrong, Jonathan Rosen, Kacy Jung, Kate Hush, Kelsey Bennett, Laura Murray, Leah Gonzales, Lola Ogbara, Maia Radanovic, Manju Shandler, Meegan Barnes, Michael Wolf, Nicole Nadeau, Olga Rudenko, Rachel Marks, Rebecca Goyette, Ron Geibel, Ronald Gonzalez, Roxi Marsen, Sandra Erbacher, Sarah Maple, Seunghwui Koo, Shamona Stokes, Sophia Wallace, Stephanie Hanes, Storm Ascher, Suzanne Wright, Tatyana Murray, Touba Alipour, Whitney Vangrin, Zac Hacmon

CURATORIAL STATEMENT

“What is sculpture today? I invited artists of all genders and generations to present their most innovative 2 and 3-dimensional sculptures for consideration for DEFINING FORM. After reviewing more than 600 artworks, I selected sculptures by over 50 artists that reflect new tendencies in the art form. DEFINING FORM artists defy stereotypes with inventive works that tackle contemporary culture. Traditionally highly male dominated, I was inspired by the new wave of female sculptors making their mark with works engaging feminist narratives. The artworks in DEFINING FORM explode with new ideas, vibrant colors, and display a thoroughly modern sensibility through fearless explorations of the artists and unique usage of innovative materials ranging from fabric, plastic, and foam to re-purposed and found objects including chewing gum, trash and dirt. Recycled materials are celebrated along with works engaging new digital technologies. The exhibit displays works that are politically charged, contrasted with those full of satire and humor. In the investigation of new tendencies, I felt it was important to juxtapose figurative works with the abstract, new materials with the classics, creating an immersive exhibit that defines new trends in sculpture and contemporary constructs of the art form.” – Indira Cesarine

Official Exhibit Website: http://untitled-space.com/defining-form-a-group-show-of-sculpture

The Untitled Space

www.untitled-space.com

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ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE

ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE

A Group Exhibition Curated by Indira Cesarine

A Portion of Proceeds to Benefit ACLU Foundation

OPENING RECEPTION January 16th

Press + VIP Preview 4pm – 6pm // Opening Reception 6pm – 9pm

More events to be announced

EXHIBITION ON VIEW

January 17–  February 4, 2018

THE UNTITLED SPACE GALLERY

45 Lispenard Street Unit 1W NYC 10013

This January, The Untitled Space gallery is pleased to present ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE group exhibition, curated by gallery director and artist Indira Cesarine, featuring the work of more than 80 contemporary artists responding to the political climate in America since the election of President Donald Trump. Opening January 16th, and on view through February 4th, ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE marks the one year anniversary of the inauguration of one of the most controversial presidents in American history. In a follow up to the gallery’s critically acclaimed group show “UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN,” which opened during the week of the 2017 presidential inauguration, exhibition ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE features artwork across all mediums addressing the issues our society has faced since the election such as immigration rights, women’s rights, transgender rights, health care, climate change, white supremacy, gender equality, gun control, sexual harassment, as well as countless other issues which have given rise to mass protest throughout the United States and abroad over the past year. ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE celebrates art as activism, giving voices to contemporary artists from all backgrounds, ages and genders. Through works inspired by the controversial policies and practices of our current president, the exhibition sheds light on the challenging issues of contemporary culture in the face of the current presidential political agenda.

EXHIBITING ARTISTS 

Alexandra Rubinstein, Alfonse Pagano, Alison Jackson, Alyson Provax, Ann Lewis, Anna Rindos, Annalisa Iadicicco, Annika Connor, Anya Rubin, Cabell Molina, Camilla Marie Dahl, Cara De Angelis, Danielle Siegelbaum, Daryl Daniels, Desire Moheb Zandi, Desdemonda Dallas, Dessie Jackson, Diana Casanova, Dolly Faibyshev, Domenica Bucalo, Eleni Giannopoulou, Elisa Garcia de la Huerta, Elise Vaselakis, Elizabeth Wentling, Erin Victoria Axtell, Fahren Feingold, Gabriela Handal, George Lorio, Grace Graupe Pillard, Haley R Hatfield, Hannah Stahl, Indira Cesarine, James Hsieh, Jamia Weir, Jamie Martinez, Janet Braun-Reinitz + Sarah Maple, Jen Dwyer, Joanne Leah, Joel Tretin, Joyce Ellen Weinstein, Kat Toronto aka Miss Meatface, Kate Hush, Katya Kan, Kiley Ames, Kristin Malin, Kristin O’Connor, Leah Schrager, Leslie Kerby, Leslie Sheryll, Linda Bond, Linda Friedman Schmidt, Lola Jiblazee, Lola Ogbara, Manju Shandler, Marne Lucas, Mary Tooley Parker, Michael Reece, Michele Pred, Nichole Washington, Olga Filippova, Olive Allen, Panteha Abareshi, Parker Day, Rada Yakova, Rebecca Goyette, Rebecca Leveille, Rosary Solimanto, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Rute Ventura, Sarah Dillion, Signe Pierce, Stephanie Hanes, Tatana Kellner, Tommy Mitchell, Touba Alipour, Valerie Carmet, Valery Estabrook, Vanessa Teran, Vittorio Ottaviani, Yuri Murphy

“This is an important time to reflect upon the last year and how Trump’s presidency has impacted our society. Since the election, we have been faced with extremes living in a country which has become increasingly divisive and threatening to civil and human rights. We live in a country facing sexism, racism and discrimination across all fronts. Last January, I was honored to partner with the ERA Coalition to present exhibition UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN, one of the first exhibitions of the Resistance movement. Now, one year later, it is important to show continued solidarity in light of the issues our society continues to grapple with. It is impossible to sit back and watch as our rights crumble before our eyes. In the past year, our culture has dealt with continuous turmoil, mass shootings, increasingly disturbing accounts of gross sexual misconduct, threats to the rights of immigrants, reproductive rights, transgender rights, threats against our rights to health care, against gender and racial equality, against the protection of our environment, of internet neutrality, as well as attacks against Planned Parenthood, the EPA, the NEA and global organizations such as UNESCO. It is extremely disturbing that our cultural foundation is being rocked by the very platform that is meant to protect and serve our nation. The exhibition ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE give voices to artists from all backgrounds, genders and ages in light of these controversial issues that have brought millions to the streets in protest. Throughout history, art has always played a significant role when it comes to representing the sentiments of the populace. It is crucial for the voices of the people to continue to be heard. The Untitled Space is honored to raise funds through this exhibition for the ACLU and support their mission to uphold civil rights and liberties in accordance to the constitution of the United States.”

– Curator Indira Cesarine

Official Exhibit Website: http://untitled-space.com/one-year-of-resistance-group-show

The Untitled Space

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ABOUT THE UNTITLED SPACE:

The Untitled Space is an art gallery located in Tribeca, New York in a landmark building on Lispenard Street. Founded in 2014 by Indira Cesarine, the gallery features an ongoing curation of exhibits of emerging and established contemporary artists exploring conceptual framework and boundary pushing ideology through mediums of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video and performance art. The gallery is committing to exploring new ideas vis-à-vis traditional and new mediums and highlights a program of “Women in Art” as well as special events aligned with our creative vision