Posts tagged with "THC"

CBD is the Alternative

Multiple sclerosis, known as MS, is an unpredictable and often disabling disease that disrupts the flow of information between the brain and body. According to the National MS Society, more than 2.3 million people are affected by MS worldwide.

Celeste Miranda, CEO and founder of CBD Expo Tour and MACE Media Group, was diagnosed at 40 years old with MS and sought out CBD as a natural healing remedy. Celeste is the woman changing how the world views cannabis products and is on a mission to educate the public on the power of CBD. For Celeste, her experience with CBD and struggle with MS is a personal one. She believes that CBD is not a last result but should be the first solution.

Check out our interview below with Celeste talking about all things MS, CBD and the upcoming 2019 CBD Expo Tour.

1. Please tell us about how you were diagnosed with MS.

About eight years ago, I woke up in the morning and could not feel anything from my waist down. I could move and walk normally but when I would scratch my leg, I couldn’t feel myself doing it. I went into the emergency room and about 16 hours later, I was told that I had MS and had three lesions on my brain and two on my spine.

2. What are some of the difficulties and symptoms that you experienced with MS?

The main symptoms that I experience with MS are muscle spasticity, fatigue and brain fog.

3. What medicines or therapies did you use to treat MS before trying CBD?

I was originally prescribed two medications; one almost gave me a rare brain infection and the other wasn’t strong enough so it caused a bunch of relapses. I was also prescribed a multitude of muscle relaxers to help my muscle spasticity.

4. What brought you to seek out CBD as a cure for your MS?

I hated the feeling of being on muscle relaxers and felt like I couldn’t function while on them. I had a client at the time that was a producer of a CBD gum and he offered to send me some to try out. I would take it at the same time that I would normally have taken a muscle relaxer when I was starting to get spasticity in my legs from the MS. I tried the gum and within 10 minutes, my spacitiy went away, completely.

From there, I started researching CBD and this was as new forms started coming out – gummy bears, oils, and things like that. So I got completely off all the muscle relaxers and to this day, I am only on my monthly infusions of Tysabri and CBD.

It took me a lot of research and time to learn the correct dosage for my body. In the morning, I do a smaller dosage and then in the evening, when I know my spasticity usually gets bad, I’ll take a larger dosage. I’ve got it extremely dialed in and those are the only two things I am currently on; the tysabri and CBD. Hopefully, one day we’ll know that it helps enough in lesion prevention that I can get off the Tysabri but for now I am on both and am thrilled because I am no longer on muscle relaxers.

5. What was your doctors reaction to you taking CBD?

The doctors knew from the beginning how I got off the muscle relaxers but they originally did not say much. About three years ago, my doctor at Stanford called me and told me that they had gotten approved for research on MS and CBD and needed my help to get it off the ground. Within two weeks, we were making a bunch of noise and had money coming in to reach the $150,000 goal. At that point, my doctor called me and told me to stop immediately. When I asked why, she told me that Stanford had just lost one of their biggest financial contributors over this and that she had no choice in the manner. To say the least, for the last three years I have been a patient at Cedars-Sinai. I guess in the end, money talks.

6. Tell us about your background and how your experience with MS & CBD ties into your career in the cannabis industry?

Ironically, it all happened at the same time. I had switched my marketing firm from “mainstream” to cannabis shortly after being diagnosed with MS. They were unrelated, but the timing was close.

7. Tell us why you started CBD Expo?

For me, it is personal and the whole purpose of the CBD Expo Tour is education. There are so many questions surrounding CBD and people are very confused about it. Our main goal is to provide education and also to get exposure to some of the products that we think are the best ones out there.

8. What is CBD Expo?

CBD Expo is not like your normal trade show – we focus on both the medical and education sides of our event. We are not a fly by night company, we are here for the long run. We chose our locations for the 2019 Expo strategically because we want to create a surge of knowledge into these communities. So for example, our next conference that is coming up, CBD Expo Midwest in Indianapolis, was chosen because we saw a large amount of sales coming from Indiana from our first show in the West. We took a poll from our exhibitors and it turned out that 70% of their sales were from Indiana. After finding this out, it only made sense to choose this region as our first destination for our 2019 tour.

9. What are the main highlights for the 2019 CBD Expo Tour?

All of our locations are themed and contain panels and carefully selected presentations to create a well-rounded show and meet the needs of each region.
-CBD Expo Midwest (Indianapolis, IN – March 15-16, 2019) focuses on CBD 101: Basic CBD Knowledge and Industry Trends.
-CBD Expo South (San Antonio, TX – June 28-29, 2019) focuses on X.
-CBD Expo Mountain (Denver, CO – October 11-12, 2019) focuses on compliance, regulation, investments and business.
-Cannabinoid + Natural Products (San Diego, CA – December 5-6) focuses on cannabinoid research and cannabinoid formulations.

We are very excited to for CBD Expo Tour 2019 and would like to encourage anyone who is interested in learning more about CBD from experts in the field or launching their own CBD business to join us. More information on the 2019 CBD Expo Tour can be found at https://cbdexpo.net/.

CBD: An Alternative to Prescription Drugs?

In the modern world, our first approach to treating an illness is to find the most suitable pharmaceutical drug, which we typically get either over-the-counter or on prescription. However, while these medicines are normally effective, they can unlock a whole new box of issues, including dependency and side effects.

Becoming reliant on medication can be mentally unsettling, and nasty side effects like nausea and dizziness typically require further treatment, leaving patients on a cocktail of pharmaceutical-grade drugs before they know it.

In the case of opioid painkillers, dependency may even be life-threatening, with the risk of overdose frighteningly high. In 2016, abuse of prescription opioid painkillers and recreational opiates accounted for more than 40,000 US lives, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

This cycle of illness, drugs, side effects and more drugs is wearing thin with many, and combined with the new wave of medical cannabis science, a clear divide has formed between those who favor prescription drugs, and those who’d rather take natural, plant-based medicines.

From a historical perspective, medicinal cannabis use makes perfect sense, with the herb being used for millennia across the world, but particularly in Africa and Asia.

Technological advancements have greatly developed our knowledge of cannabis, and scientists now know which compounds are responsible for various effects. For example, the psychoactive “high” mostly comes from a therapeutic cannabinoid called tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). However, numerous other cannabinoids have medicinal properties, sans the hallucinogenic effects.

Cannabidiol (CBD) is the most studied and seemingly most useful non-intoxicating cannabinoid, and the market for CBD products has exploded in the 2010s, thanks in part to the relaxation of laws surrounding non-psychoactive hemp.

CBD over opioids
Opioid-based painkillers like Tramadol are now regularly prescribed for chronic pain, with stronger synthetic drugs such as fentanyl available on prescription for the most extreme discomfort. These drugs are designed to interact with opioid receptors in the opioid system. The pain relief from these drugs is substantial, however sustained use leads to increased tolerance, stronger doses and addiction.

However, CBD may be helpful for chronic patients, and also those who have ended up dependent on opioids, as the cannabinoid seems to exhibit anti-addiction properties by interfering with pleasure-reward mechanisms.

By elevating concentrations of anandamide in the body, CBD is promoting a neurotransmitter that works to ease both physical and mental pain. How CBD tackles addiction is less clear, but some evidence indicates that CBD is active in the opioid system.

Not all pain is the same – for example, some chronic pain is persistent and always at a similar intensity, whereas the worst effects of inflammatory and neuropathic pain tend to come from flare-ups.

For internal neuropathic pain, CBD vape oil and e-liquid treatment is ideal, because the relief comes very quickly. Meanwhile, lingering pain is economically and perhaps more efficiently managed by orally-consumed CBD products (e.g. capsules, edibles, coffee).

Experimenting with gels, creams and balms infused with cannabis or CBD is a novel method of coping with localized pain. These ensure that the cannabinoid receptors in the affected area are directly activated.

CBD: the new anti-inflammatory drug?
Immune system response is still not well that understood, and this has made it difficult to control. Researchers have struggled to find ways of influencing inflammation, but studies into the endocannabinoid system have found that immune system response is accessible via cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2). Endocannabinoids look to signal a stoppage in inflammation, after a wound has fully healed or an infection is neutralized.

This discovery may be crucial, as the current leading class of anti-inflammatories (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs) are known to cause concerning side effects, including stomach ulcers.

The best CBD product for inflammation depends, unsurprisingly on the type of inflammation. Internal conditions like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which could be exacerbated by endocannabinoid deficiency, respond well to both CBD vape juice and CBD edibles, or even tincture oils.

For osteoarthritis, a form of inflammation which affects the joints, CBD creams and other topicals are likely to produce better results.

CBD’s promise as an antidepressant
Cannabinoid research is providing genuine hope for antidepressant researchers, after decades of stagnation in medication development. The current situation with depression medicine is far from ideal, with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) slow to show benefits – for up to 40 percent of patients, these drugs may not even work at all. And then there are the side effects to contend with, which range from drowsiness to impotence. Depersonalization and derealization have also been anecdotally reported with SSRIs.

However, a glut of promising studies on CBD and the brain have found that the ECS could be important in correcting off-balance brain chemistry. The CB1 receptor modulates many variables, mood being one, and the bond between anandamide and this receptor is important for good mental wellbeing. Factors outside of the ECS also affect mood, but the potency of anandamide as an antidepressant makes the link with the CB1 receptor an essential one.

Some of the most exciting research on cannabinoids has been on their neuroprotective and neurogenesis properties. Studies on the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex and cannabinoid treatments, which are associated with depression, have demonstrated that CBD is able to repair these regions of the brain, by restoring neuronal circuitry and helping to form new brain cells.

A 2018 study on rats carried out in Brazil showed that CBD was effective from the first treatment and for up to seven days after the last dose at blocking synaptic proteins which damage neuronal circuitry in the prefrontal cortex. Meanwhile, CBD-initiated neurogenesis in the hippocampus helps to regrow the brains of adult rats with depression. These results have not yet been replicated in humans, but rats are used for such studies because their brains are similar to humans. General memories and our autobiographical memory are stored in the hippocampus.

The only CBD products that aren’t suitable for managing depression are topicals, as the cannabinoids remain in the skin, and do not reach the brain.

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Fetch: CBD For Pets

Numerous international studies suggest that CBD may be beneficial for pets with issues such as anxiety, inflammation, seizures generalized pain, nausea and inappetence. New Fetch tinctures which some in two bottle sizes depending on the size of your pet) contain full-spectrum CBD obtained through CO2 extraction from American-grown industrial hemp. There is no THC (the chemical in marijuana that produces a “high” sensation) and therefore no psychoactive effects. Safe and gentle for beloved pets, each Fetch formula is third party lab-tested for potency and residual solvents. All of the plant material used is tested for heavy metals, pesticides and herbicides.

The company was started by a Boulder, Colorado-based full-service hemp extraction lab (founded in 2016 by combat veteran, Craig Henderson) called Extract Labs. It’s a great product to use to chill out your pet if they have anxiety, have to travel or are in stressful situations. For older pets, it’s also fantastic for joint and muscle pain.