Posts tagged with "symptoms"

6 Therapies To Alleviate Pain Linked To Diabetes And Other Health Issues

The complications associated with diabetes are many, and chronic pain is common for many who suffer from the disease – especially back pain.

Most adults experience back pain at some point in their lives, and almost half suffer neck pain. Usually, an injury or other musculoskeletal issue is associated with either affliction, although on occasion a disease may be linked to the problem as well.

Just as an example of the latter, researchers at the University of Sydney recently found that diabetics are at significantly higher risk of lower back pain and neck pain. While the report couldn’t establish a causal relationship between type 2 diabetes and back or neck pain, the research team pointed to preventable problems, such as obesity and lack of exercise, as contributing factors.

But whatever the source of any neck or back problem, finding that underlying cause is key to developing a treatment program that can both alleviate the pain and act as a form of prevention, says Dr. Bradford Butler, a chiropractor and author of The Blueprint for Back Pain Relief: The Essential Guide to Nonsurgical Solutions (www.drbradfordbutler.com).

“Most patients have a combination of problems causing their pain,” Butler says. “It’s very rare that just one thing needs to be treated.

“It doesn’t make sense to treat just the symptoms and not fix what is causing them. Many people, however, aren’t getting the correct therapy, so to them it’s no longer fixable. But it is – as well as preventable in the future with the right therapy.”

Butler has tips on treatments that can heal neck and back pain:

  • Acupuncture. Like chiropractic, acupuncture is a mystery to many people. “Its roots are deep in health and healing, and not in back pain alone,” Butler says. “More and more medical research is showing how incredibly effective it can be. Some studies show that it’s more effective than pain medications, and acupuncture produces actual results – it doesn’t just mask the symptoms.”
  • Chiropractic care. This a popular way to solve joint problems associated with almost all back and neck problems. “A spinal adjustment is the safest and most effective way to mobilize the joints,” Butler says. “Flexibility and range of motion of the affected segments is increased, disc circulation is improved and nerves function better.”
  • Massage therapy. “Massage is a powerful healing tool,” Butler says. “It helps to treat pain, inflammation, and spasm associated with back pain of all levels.” A highly trained massage therapist aids in breaking down scar tissue and increasing blood flow to the affected area, which accelerates healing while aiding the body in lymphatic drainage.
  • Neuromuscular reeducation. There are two different types of muscles that control the spine: voluntary and involuntary. “Voluntary muscles control global movements of your entire spine or region, movements such as bending and turning,” Butler says. “Involuntary muscles are controlled directly by the brain and central nervous system. Neuromuscular reeducation uses specific exercises and movements to stimulate your brain to retrain these involuntary muscles and make a better connection.”
  • Physical therapy. “Physical therapy helps increase range of motion, strengthens the spine against injury, and improves posture and gait,” Butler says. “Some people think about physical therapy only as it pertains to post-injury, post-surgical recovery, but it’s also critical to longevity.”
  • Spinal decompression. “This therapy has been a game-changer in the treatment of patients with back pain who have degenerated, bulging, or herniated discs,” Butler says. “It’s the most advanced nonsurgical treatment for discs. It can be used for discs in the neck or lower back.”

“Singular treatments rarely work,” Butler says. “A properly designed plan should include multiple therapies for most people if the goal is to fix the problem.”

CBD is the Alternative

Multiple sclerosis, known as MS, is an unpredictable and often disabling disease that disrupts the flow of information between the brain and body. According to the National MS Society, more than 2.3 million people are affected by MS worldwide.

Celeste Miranda, CEO and founder of CBD Expo Tour and MACE Media Group, was diagnosed at 40 years old with MS and sought out CBD as a natural healing remedy. Celeste is the woman changing how the world views cannabis products and is on a mission to educate the public on the power of CBD. For Celeste, her experience with CBD and struggle with MS is a personal one. She believes that CBD is not a last result but should be the first solution.

Check out our interview below with Celeste talking about all things MS, CBD and the upcoming 2019 CBD Expo Tour.

1. Please tell us about how you were diagnosed with MS.

About eight years ago, I woke up in the morning and could not feel anything from my waist down. I could move and walk normally but when I would scratch my leg, I couldn’t feel myself doing it. I went into the emergency room and about 16 hours later, I was told that I had MS and had three lesions on my brain and two on my spine.

2. What are some of the difficulties and symptoms that you experienced with MS?

The main symptoms that I experience with MS are muscle spasticity, fatigue and brain fog.

3. What medicines or therapies did you use to treat MS before trying CBD?

I was originally prescribed two medications; one almost gave me a rare brain infection and the other wasn’t strong enough so it caused a bunch of relapses. I was also prescribed a multitude of muscle relaxers to help my muscle spasticity.

4. What brought you to seek out CBD as a cure for your MS?

I hated the feeling of being on muscle relaxers and felt like I couldn’t function while on them. I had a client at the time that was a producer of a CBD gum and he offered to send me some to try out. I would take it at the same time that I would normally have taken a muscle relaxer when I was starting to get spasticity in my legs from the MS. I tried the gum and within 10 minutes, my spacitiy went away, completely.

From there, I started researching CBD and this was as new forms started coming out – gummy bears, oils, and things like that. So I got completely off all the muscle relaxers and to this day, I am only on my monthly infusions of Tysabri and CBD.

It took me a lot of research and time to learn the correct dosage for my body. In the morning, I do a smaller dosage and then in the evening, when I know my spasticity usually gets bad, I’ll take a larger dosage. I’ve got it extremely dialed in and those are the only two things I am currently on; the tysabri and CBD. Hopefully, one day we’ll know that it helps enough in lesion prevention that I can get off the Tysabri but for now I am on both and am thrilled because I am no longer on muscle relaxers.

5. What was your doctors reaction to you taking CBD?

The doctors knew from the beginning how I got off the muscle relaxers but they originally did not say much. About three years ago, my doctor at Stanford called me and told me that they had gotten approved for research on MS and CBD and needed my help to get it off the ground. Within two weeks, we were making a bunch of noise and had money coming in to reach the $150,000 goal. At that point, my doctor called me and told me to stop immediately. When I asked why, she told me that Stanford had just lost one of their biggest financial contributors over this and that she had no choice in the manner. To say the least, for the last three years I have been a patient at Cedars-Sinai. I guess in the end, money talks.

6. Tell us about your background and how your experience with MS & CBD ties into your career in the cannabis industry?

Ironically, it all happened at the same time. I had switched my marketing firm from “mainstream” to cannabis shortly after being diagnosed with MS. They were unrelated, but the timing was close.

7. Tell us why you started CBD Expo?

For me, it is personal and the whole purpose of the CBD Expo Tour is education. There are so many questions surrounding CBD and people are very confused about it. Our main goal is to provide education and also to get exposure to some of the products that we think are the best ones out there.

8. What is CBD Expo?

CBD Expo is not like your normal trade show – we focus on both the medical and education sides of our event. We are not a fly by night company, we are here for the long run. We chose our locations for the 2019 Expo strategically because we want to create a surge of knowledge into these communities. So for example, our next conference that is coming up, CBD Expo Midwest in Indianapolis, was chosen because we saw a large amount of sales coming from Indiana from our first show in the West. We took a poll from our exhibitors and it turned out that 70% of their sales were from Indiana. After finding this out, it only made sense to choose this region as our first destination for our 2019 tour.

9. What are the main highlights for the 2019 CBD Expo Tour?

All of our locations are themed and contain panels and carefully selected presentations to create a well-rounded show and meet the needs of each region.
-CBD Expo Midwest (Indianapolis, IN – March 15-16, 2019) focuses on CBD 101: Basic CBD Knowledge and Industry Trends.
-CBD Expo South (San Antonio, TX – June 28-29, 2019).
-CBD Expo Mountain (Denver, CO – October 11-12, 2019) focuses on compliance, regulation, investments and business.
-Cannabinoid + Natural Products (San Diego, CA – December 5-6) focuses on cannabinoid research and cannabinoid formulations.

We are very excited to for CBD Expo Tour 2019 and would like to encourage anyone who is interested in learning more about CBD from experts in the field or launching their own CBD business to join us. More information on the 2019 CBD Expo Tour can be found at https://cbdexpo.net/.

Examining Concussions In Youth Sports

A recent article by Time Magazine cited that children who have been diagnosed with depression are more likely to suffer a concussion while playing youth sports. This correlation flips a common belief that athletes of all ages are more likely to experience symptoms of depression during and after suffering the effects of a concussion.

The article is just the latest in a string of new discoveries regarding brain injuries in American sports. Researchers from across the nation are looking at different angles in order to keep American athletes safer in the future. Consider that Philly.com reported that between 1.1 million and 1.9 million children and teens are treated for concussions caused by organized sports.

These numbers don’t tell the whole story as one of the links between depression and concussions is the fact that students who have suffered from depression are more in tune with their bodies. They are more likely to document the injury and speak up about an issue.

Not reporting a concussion can come from a fear of missing a game, school or after work job. It can also come from simply not understanding what is happening to a person’s body.  Concussion awareness is just as important as the equipment being used in the prevention and proper medical care after a concussion.

The Concussion Legacy Foundation has determined that at least 1 in 5 sports-related concussions are the result of a head impact with the playing field surface. The turf is the common culprit in all sports.

It’s why GreenPlay is helping athletes at all levels become safer through synthetic turfgrass technology. Turfgrass is the term used to describe engineered natural turf on playing fields. Pristine turfgrass is proven to be the benchmark for safety and performance. Compared to synthetic turf, turfgrass has shown to produce exceptional results under impact tests to access head injuries.

Owner of GreenPlay, Domenic Carapella, explains the impact pristine Turfgrass is making for athletes across the country saying, “Turfgrass helps lessen the harsh blows to the head and body that often happen during sports activities at all levels. When it comes to what we can control, the playing surface should be just as important as the equipment being worn.”

According to Greenplay Organics:

  • It’s important to discuss the issue of concussions in American youth sports in order to help drive change for the children of our country.
  • Pristine Turfgrass is the benchmark for the safest, high-performance playing surface.
  • Turfgrass is firm to run on, provides ideal traction and is resilient under bodily and head impacts.

Winter Season × Headaches

Many can agree that the winter season can be a headache – from shoveling snow, bearing the freezing temperatures, de-icing the car – the list goes on. However, what many don’t realize is that the chilly weather can be physically giving you a headache (all thanks to changes in barometric pressure).

With migraines being the 3rd most prevalent illness in the world, it’s important that people understand their triggers and know that weather is one of the top causes of migraines.

Dr. Susan Hutchinson is a practicing migraine physician and medical advisor at MigraineX, who can discuss:

• ‘Tis the Season for Migraines – Are ‘Winter Headaches’ Really a Thing?

• How to Know If Weather Might Be Your Migraine Trigger

• Solutions for Weather-Related Migraines

• More

About Dr. Susan Hutchinson

Dr. Susan Hutchinson is a headache specialist and board-certified family practice physician. In February 2007, she founded Orange County Migraine & Headache Center, dedicated to serving patients with headache and mood disorders.

Prior to starting Orange County Migraine & Headache Center, Dr. Hutchinson practiced as a family practice physician in the Irvine Area since 1985. Over the years, she developed a passion for helping patients with headache, especially migraine. Dr. Hutchinson suffers from migraine headaches which gives her an empathy with her patients. She felt such a calling to help patients with headache and mood disorders that she decided to specialize and devote her career to alleviating the suffering caused by both headaches and mood disorders..

She lectures nationally on the subject of headache; has written dozens of articles for medical journals; participated in headache research projects and is very active in numerous professional organizations such as the American Headache Society and the National Headache Foundation. She is the immediate post-chair of the Women’s Issues section of the American Headache Society after serving in the chair position for 5 years. Dr. Hutchinson is a dynamic and sought-after speaker.