Posts tagged with "sustainable living"

Lauri Markkanen Gives Up Red Meat

The individual’s role in combating climate change is becoming a prevalent topic, following the release of the IPCC report this autumn. Leading by example, NBA star Lauri Markkanen is taking a stance by changing his daily eating habits. As his first action to combat climate change on a personal level, the Chicago Bulls player has given up eating red meat.

“As my first action for #DontChoke, I pledge to stop consuming red meat as a concrete step towards minimizing my personal carbon footprint. Every move counts, play your part”, Markkanen declares on social media.

Following his #DontChoke collaboration with renewable energy company Neste, the decision is an exemplary step in doing his part in the fight against global warming.

Markkanen explains, that having recently become a father has made the well-being of the environment even more significant to him. Markkanen encourages his fans to follow in his footsteps to ensure a better environment for generations to come. “I want to do everything in my power so that my child will grow up in a clean environment, like I did. This is a call to all my fans to do their share”, Markkanen explains.

The #DontChoke campaign is a call to action for individuals to do their share in battling climate change. The NBA player kicked off the campaign by shooting hoops with a basketball covered with a hand painted visualization of this year’s heat map. Throughout the on-going campaign, Markkanen will consider the elements of his own lifestyle and opt for more sustainable alternatives. Leading by example, the NBA player hopes to encourage others to make their own climate pledge.

EPA TO CLEAN CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has finalized its plan to clean up contaminated groundwater in the eastern area of the Old Roosevelt Field Contaminated Groundwater Area Superfund Site in Garden City, N.Y. A treatment process will be used to remove trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) from groundwater, thereby reducing potential threats to people’s health. The cleanup is estimated to cost approximately $13.14 million.