Posts tagged with "suicide"

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

Ending Suicide This National Suicide Prevention Month

By Vinay Saranga M.D.

National Suicide Prevention Month is this September, with Suicide Prevention Week being recognized Sunday, Sep. 8, 2019 – Saturday, Sep. 14, 2019. Suicide is a growing issue in America, with an estimated 44,965 Americans ending their own lives each year, or roughly 123 each day. Think about that for a moment: 123 people each day saying they’ve had enough.

Suicide is the worst possible outcome there is not just for the individual, but for the family he or she leaves behind. Quite often this involves parents and grandparents, children, siblings and friends who are left wondering why. Why did he do it? Why didn’t I see the signs? Could I have done more? Is this somehow partially my fault? Was I not nice to him or her?

As mental health professionals, it hurts us too. If the person didn’t get help, why not? Was he or she denied access to mental health benefits? If he or she was under our care, where did we go wrong? Did we not see the signs or prescribe the wrong course of treatment?    

When it comes to suicide, there are no straightforward answers. In fact, most of the time, we never get answers unless the person left behind a note, and even then, we are still often left scratching our heads in disbelief and dismay.

That’s why initiatives like National Suicide Prevention Month and Suicide Prevention Week are so important. It helps us shine the light on the pain of suicide, even if for a short period of time. The reality is, we need to have open conversations about suicide, depression and overall mental health all the time, 365 days a year. We need to end the stigma surrounding mental illness immediately or unfortunately, suicide will continue to needlessly end the lives of so many around us.

The only bit of good news is that suicide is preventable, but an intervention must take place. The driving force behind a suicide must be properly dealt with before it spirals out of control, whether this is a mental illness, nasty divorce, job loss or anything else.

We can provide hope and support by starting a conversation. Reach out to help normalize the topic. Don’t hesitate to seek treatment for mental illnesses. It is not a sign of weakness. Someone suffering from heart disease wouldn’t hesitate to seek help for their heart condition. The same normalization needs to be visible in the mental health community. If you suspect someone might be suicidal, here are some things you can do to help.

Talk

Again, help normalize the topic by conversation. Simply asking someone if they are thinking about suicide is a good step. Never promise to keep their suicidal thoughts a secret. Be open and non-judgmental. Encourage immediate professional intervention through the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. It is available 24-hours a day.

Connect

Professional help is essential. Don’t just suggest it because they might be unlikely to follow through. Do it for them. Someone who might be suicidal could be suffering from deep depression, mania and other conditions that sometimes prevent clarity. Do the research and help get them set up with an appointment with a mental health professional like a clinical psychologist, psychiatrist or licensed counselor.

Support

If someone in your life is contemplating suicide, constantly remind them that there is hope. There are many successful treatments which can help turn how their feeling around. Life is worth living. Continue to support and communicate with them. You can increase their feelings of connectedness and share your ongoing support. There is evidence that even a simple form of reaching out, like sending a card or email, can potentially reduce their risk for suicide. Remember, loneliness is a major cause of depression.

This National Suicide Prevention Month, let’s put an end to this horrific epidemic once and for all. The more we continue the conversation and bring attention to it, the more people we will reach and save.

Vinay Saranga M.D. is a psychiatrist and founder of Saranga Comprehensive Psychiatry. https://www.sarangapsychiatry.com/

“Two Reasons Why I Won’t Report My Child Abuse”

Excerpt from The Teenage and Young Adult Survival Handbook By Steve Simpson

“The first reason is I know that I could be better in school. I know I mess up at home. The clothes I wear. The way I have my hair. The attitude I have. The trouble that I get in. I bring it on myself. If I were a better person these things probably wouldn’t happen to me. Ever since I can remember, I have been told by my parents that all the problems at home are my fault. People have it worse than I do.” These are the thoughts of many who are being abused and the first reasons why they won’t report it.

What I discovered was that even children who do fantastic in school, never get in any trouble, and do everything “right” still get abused by their parents or abusive adults in their home. Their parents even called them the same names as me and they were model children. I’ve found it has nothing to do with the way I act at all. It has nothing to do with who I was. It has nothing to do with the children. It has to do with the adults. Child abuse and discipline have nothing to do with each other. People who abuse children do it because of their own sickness, be it alcoholism, drug abuse or other problems they have.

“I knew my father or my mother’s boyfriend had no right to abuse me but I always felt that my mother would get in trouble for it.” This is the thought of many abuse victims and the second reason why they don’t report it. Even though they are getting abused they still try to protect the non-abusing/co-dependent parent. What I offer to those children is you would not so much be getting your parent in trouble, but you would be getting them help. Most authorities get them to go to therapy, which would stop that parent from allowing abuse to themselves and others in the future, therefore making their life better. So by protecting yourself you’re actually not getting anyone in trouble but protecting them and getting them help as well. Even the abusive adult could end up getting help as a result of you reporting it. Nobody should abuse you, period!

If you are being abused in any way, sometimes the abuse looks like it’s becoming less frequent. Don’t be fooled by this. It could suddenly pick up again and get worse. It will not stop unless you do something to stop it. Speak to a teacher, guidance counselor, school social worker or psychologist. Counselors from community centers and sometimes even people from local churches will know what to do and how to get you help. You can call Child Protective Services for your local area. Nobody should be abused in any way. You are no exception. You are worth getting help.

Approximately 5 children die a day as a result of child abuse. For those who suspect child abuse whether it be a relative or neighbor, it always amazes me how people will call 911 simply because someone parked in the wrong spot or put the garbage out on the wrong night, yet they won’t get “involved” in possibly saving a child’s life or at a minimum their childhood (not to mention the problems they will have as an adult as a result of their abuse). As responsible people we are already “involved”.

If you suspect child abuse it probably does exist. Don’t make excuses or protect and enable the abuser. Protect who you are supposed to protect, the children.

 

About Steve Simpson
Steve Simpson is a child advocate, child abuse survivor and media commentator who just released The Teenage and Young Adult Survival Handbook — a small guide that is modestly tucked inside in all four of his YA adventure novels which covers most of the topics plaguing young people today—suicide, bullying, sexual abuse, physical abuse, verbal abuse, self-worth, being the child of an addict, living in a dysfunctional home, surviving school and more. Simpson was even recognized by President Barack Obama, former New York governor David Paterson and the County Executive of Nassau County for his efforts on behalf of abused children.

 

TWLOHA Announces “Tomorrow Needs You”

Melbourne, Fla. – August 14, 2018 – The nonprofit To Write Love on Her Arms just launched its 7th annual campaign to honor World Suicide Prevention Day (September 10) and National Suicide Prevention Week (September 9 – September 15). This year’s campaign is called ” Tomorrow Needs You.”

According to the World Health Organization, 800,000 people die by suicide globally each year. That’s one person every 40 seconds. Additionally, the CDC recently reported that as of 2016, the suicide rate in the United States has risen 25% over the last 20 years.

TWLOHA Founder Jamie Tworkoswki shared: “World Suicide Prevention Day has become the most important day of the year for TWLOHA. This campaign is our biggest and best attempt not only to bring a message of hope and encouragement to folks all over, but also to raise money for people to get the help they need and deserve.

Nancy Lublin, CEO of Crisis Text Line said: “This campaign is all about empowering people to reach out for help and share their experiences. It’s so reflective of who To Write Love on Her Arms is-warm and empathetic, focused on bringing out the best in people.”

People can participate in this year’s campaign by purchasing the organization’s World Suicide Prevention Day pack, joining the conversation on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook using #TomorrowNeedsYou, #WSPD18, and by donating to their  fundraising campaign. TWLOHA has set a goal to raise $100,000 to provide counseling scholarships and to help connect thousands of people to local mental health resources.

 

To Write Love on Her Arms is a nonprofit dedicated to presenting hope and finding help for people struggling with depression, addiction, self-injury, and suicide. It exists to encourage, inform, inspire, and also to invest directly into treatment and recovery. Since its start in 2006, TWLOHA has donated over $2.1 million directly into treatment and recovery and answered over 210,000 messages from over 100 countries. For more information on To Write Love on Her Arms, please visit: www.twloha.com.

In addition to this year’s WSPD campaign, TWLOHA recently announced three dates of “An Evening With To Write Love on Her Arms.” The tour will run from September 18-20, hitting Tampa, FL, Gainesville, FL, and Atlanta, GA, respectively. The evening will consist of Tworkowski speaking, plus performances by two-time National Poetry Slam champion, Sierra DeMulder, and musician JP Saxe. Tickets for all three nights are on sale now. General admission tickets range from $13-$15, and VIP tickets are $40, which includes a pre-show Meet & Greet + Q&A. For more information, please visit: https://twloha.com/events/.

TWLOHA Announces Tour Dates

Melbourne, FL – August 6, 2018 – To Write Love on Her Arms (TWLOHA) is thrilled to announce three dates of “An Evening With To Write Love on Her Arms.” The tour will run from September 18-20, hitting Tampa, FL, Gainesville, FL, and Atlanta, GA, respectively. The evening will consist of TWLOHA founder Jamie Tworkowski speaking, plus performances by two-time National Poetry Slam champion, Sierra DeMulder and musician JP Saxe. For more information, please click here

“After mostly speaking at colleges in recent years, I’m so excited to get back into music venues. These will be small ticketed shows, which represent something new for TWLOHA and for me. If these go well, our goal is to add more dates so that we can bring these nights of hope to folks all over,” shares Tworkowski.

Tickets for all three nights are on sale now. General admission tickets range from $13-$15, and VIP tickets are $40, which includes a pre-show Meet & Greet + Q&A. Further event details are listed below

An Evening with To Write Love on Her Arms:

TAMPA, FL

When: Tuesday, September 18th, 2018

Where: The Attic // 1510 E. 8th Ave.

Time: 7:30PM (Doors @ 7PM)

Tickets: https://twloha.com/events/an-evening-with-to-write-love-on-her-arms/

GAINESVILLE, FL

When: Wednesday, September 19th, 2018

Where: High Dive // 210 SW 2nd Ave.

Time: 9PM (Doors @ 8PM)

Tickets: https://twloha.com/events/an-evening-with-to-write-love-on-her-arms-2/

ATLANTA, GA

When: Thursday, September 20th, 2018

Where: The Masquerade (Heaven) // 50 Lower Alabama St. SW, Suite 22

Time: 8PM (Doors @ 7PM)

Tickets: https://twloha.com/events/an-evening-with-to-write-love-on-her-arms-3/

To Write Love on Her Arms is a nonprofit dedicated to presenting hope and finding help for people struggling with depression, addiction, self-injury, and suicide. It exists to encourage, inform, inspire, and also to invest directly into treatment and recovery. Since its start in 2006, TWLOHA has donated over $2.1 million directly into treatment and recovery and answered over 200,000 messages from over 100 countries.

This past September, TWLOHA wrapped its 6th annual campaign to honor National Suicide Prevention Week and World Suicide Prevention Day. The organization was overwhelmed by the amount of love and support shown during this year’s campaign, titled, “Stay. Find what you are made for,“during which over $103.5K was raised for treatment and counseling. The campaign was shared by supporters all over the world, including NBA player Kyle Korver, US Women’s National Soccer Team stars Alex Morgan, Christen Press, and Ashlyn Harris, actress Shantel VanSanten, Switchfoot‘s Jon Foreman, Dustin Kensrue of Thrice, actress and singer Debby Ryan, The Ready Set‘s Jordan Witzrigreuter, and Jess Bowen of The Summer Set, all of whom were featured in a special video message directed by Dustin Miller, a Florida-based filmmaker and longtime TWLOHA collaborator: https://youtu.be/37cB2CQt_YA.

A Message to A Friend

Dear Fellow Humans,

Sitting across from me is the remarkable human and brave survivor, Asia Argento, who has been through more than most could stand, and yet stand she does. She stood up to her monster rapist and now she has to stand up to yet another monster, suicide. The suicide of her beloved lover and ally, Anthony Bourdain. I write these truths because I have been asked to. I know so many around the world thought of Anthony Bourdain as a friend and when a friend dies, it hurts. Many of these people who lost their ‘friend’ are wanting to lash out and blame. You must not sink to that level. Suicide is a horrible choice, but it is that person’s choice.

When Anthony met Asia, it was instant chemistry. They laughed, they loved and he was her rock during the hardships of this last year. Anthony was open with his demons, he even wrote a book about them. In the beginning of their relationship, Anthony told a mutual friend, “He’s never met anyone who wanted to die more than him.” And through a lot of this last year, Asia did want the pain to stop. But here’s the thing, over their time together, thankfully, she did the work to get help, so she could stay alive and live another day for her and her children. Anthony’s depression didn’t let him, he put down his armor, and that was very much his choice. His decision, not hers. His depression won. Anthony and Asia had a free relationship, they loved without borders of traditional relationships, and they established the parameters of their relationship early on. Asia is a free bird, and so was Anthony. Was. Such a terrible word to write. I’ve heard from many that the past two years they were together were some of his happiest and that should give us all solace.

Anthony was 61, the same age my father was when he died. My father also suffered from intermittent deep depression, and like Anthony, was part of a “pull up your bootstraps and march on” generation. The a “strong man doesn’t ask for help” generation. I know before Anthony died he reached out for help, and yet he did not take the doctor’s advice. And that has led us here, to this tragedy, to this loss, to this world of hurt. Do NOT do the sexist thing and burn a woman on the pyre of misplaced blame. Anthony’s internal war was his war, but now she’s been left on the battlefield to take the bullets. It is in no way fair or acceptable to blame her or anyone else, not even Anthony. We are asking you to be better, to look deeper, to read and learn about mental illness, suicide and depression before you make it worse for survivors by judging that which we do not understand, that which can never fully be understood. Sometimes we are stuck in the unknowable, and that is where we are now, a massive wave of darkness that threatens to swallow everyone in its wake.

As I watch Asia do her job on set today, I see a pillar of strength who continues to work to put food on her children’s table. I see Elizabeth Taylor carrying on filming Cat on a Hot Tin Roof despite her love, her husband, dying in a plane crash. I see all of us who have carried on. Please join me in sending healing energy to Anthony on his journey, and to all who’ve been left behind to journey on without him. There is no one to blame but the stigma of loneliness, the stigma of asking for help, the stigma of mental illness, the stigma of being famous and hurting.

We must do more and be better. Anthony, our friend, would want it that way.

To the media and to the random commenter, Anthony would never have wanted Asia to be hurt, I’d like to think he would want us to have the collective conversation that needs to be had about depression. Blame is NOT a conversation, it is the shutting down of our collective growth. Which is where we are now. We have a choice as humans, shrink to our smaller, uglier selves, or be better and grow as only true Phoenixes can. I urge you to be that Phoenix.

With great sadness and even greater hope, I remain,

Rose McGowan

cc: Asia Argento

If you are considering suicide, reach out. We need you here. You matter. You exist. You count. There is help a phone call away, reach out.

Suicide Prevention Hotlines:

Argentina: +5402234930430

Australia: 131114

Austria: 017133374

Belgium: 106

Bosnia & Herzegovina: 080 05 03 05

Botswana: 3911270

Brazil: 212339191

Canada: 5147234000 (Montreal); 18662773553 (outside Montreal)

Croatia: 014833888

Denmark: +4570201201

Egypt: 7621602

Finland: 010 195 202

France: 0145394000

Germany: 08001810771

Holland: 09000767

Hong Kong: +852 2382 0000

Hungary: 116123

India: 8888817666

Ireland: +4408457909090

Israel: 1201 or 972-889-1333 from abroad

Italy: 800860022

Japan: +810352869090

Mexico: 5255102550

New Zealand: 045861048

Norway: +4781533300

Pakistan: 15 / 115 (Emergency)

Philippines: 028969191

Poland: 5270000

Russia: 0078202577577

Spain: 914590050

South Africa: 0514445691

Sweden: 46317112400

Switzerland: 143

United Kingdom: 08457909090

USA: 18002738255

For a USA Crisis Text Line, please text CONNECT to 741741 from anywhere in the USA, anytime, about any type of crisis.

Anthony Bourdain

The amazing award-winning celebrity chef, writer and storyteller Anthony Bourdain has died on Friday morning at the age of 61. He was found dead in the tiny village of Kaysersburg inside his hotel room by his friend Eric Ripert and it was later confirmed as a suicide. They had travelled to France to film for their current series Parts Unknown on culinary traditions around the world.

Throughout his shows, he has inspired people to have adventure with both food and travel. His curious and adventurous spirit has lead to many journeys and has taken viewers around the world, visiting over 100 countries. He allowed everyone to open up to him with his splendid personality and drew in his audiences along into the fun while he explored different cultures through food. Anthony helped shine a different light in countries in which many viewers have never contemplated travelling to. Along with this, he was always able to reveal a broader story than the ones seen on the surface by many of us. The world will greatly miss this legend and his passion.

Anyone in crisis, or who knows someone in crisis, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting TALK to 741-741

Kate Spade

55 year old American fashion designer Kate Spade passed away on Tuesday from an apparent suicide by hanging after she was found in her Manhattan apartment. At 10:10am, Kate’s housekeeper contacted the police. A suicide note was also found on site, naming both her daughter and husband in the letter. She had been suffering from anxiety and depression for many years and had been regularly visiting her doctor for treatment and medications.

She revolutionized the fashion industry with her iconic stylish handbag designs after she founded Kate Spade New York in 1993. Kate Spade was an absolutely must have item in the 1990’s and her brand quickly became popular as a result of the style, functionality, and sophistication of her elegantly designed bags. She will be greatly missed, but her legacy will live on for years to come.

Heart Camp with Jamie Tworkowski

To Write Love on Her Arms Founder 

Jamie Tworkowski

Launches HEART CAMP Workshops

o Write Love on Her Arms (TWLOHA) founder and New York Times best-selling author Jamie Tworkowski has announced a new project he is calling HEART CAMP.

HEART CAMP will be a two-day workshop led by Jamie, each a gathering of 40 attendees. Over the two days, Jamie will be sharing his stories, experiences, and passions. Topics will include authenticity, writing, mental health, starting things that matter, and more. Attendees will be invited to give input on what is discussed at each workshop, and much of the event will be Q&A. With the first HEART CAMP selling out in a week, a second workshop has been added.

On HEART CAMP, Jamie states:

“I really enjoy being able to connect with people, and my hope is that folks walk away feeling encouraged. The challenge tends to be time. It can be difficult to give a question the answer it deserves in one minute or two tweets. There’s almost always a line of people or a curfew or a plane to catch.

 

“HEART CAMP was born from this idea: What if instead of one minute, we had two days? What would it look like to get a small group of people together, to share everything I’ve learned and everything I’m passionate about? What if folks were invited deep inside my work and deep inside my story, into not only the successes but the failures as well? Could I provide language and framework and ideas to help people start movements and chase dreams?”

 

HEART CAMP has two upcoming workshops scheduled: January 14 & 15, 2018 (SOLD OUT), and February 11 & 12, 2018. They will be hosted at the Crowne Plaza Melbourne Oceanfront in Indialantic, Florida.

For more information and to register for HEART CAMP, please visit: http://heartcampwithjamie.com/.

Jamie Tworkowski is the founder of To Write Love on Her Arms and the New York Times bestselling author of If You Feel Too Much. TWLOHA began in 2006 as a written story and Jamie’s attempt to help one friend. Since that time, the TWLOHA team has responded to 200,000 messages from people in 100 countries, and given more than two million dollars to treatment and recovery. Jamie spends much of his time on the road, telling the TWLOHA story and bringing a message of hope to audiences at universities, concerts and conferences across America. His work has taken him to Australia, the United Kingdom, India, and Iraq. Jamie has been interviewed by CNN, NBC Nightly News, CBS Sunday Morning, and Rolling Stone Magazine. A proud uncle, Jamie is also a lifelong surfer, basketball fan, and music lover. He lives in Melbourne Beach, Florida.