Posts tagged with "spine"

Keep Summer from Wrecking Your Back

Too often we start the summer with enthusiasm, only to be sidetracked by back pain,” says Dr. Bradford Butler, a chiropractor and author of The Blueprint for Back Pain Relief: The Essential Guide to Nonsurgical Solutions .“There are important prevention steps you can take to avoid back pain associated with summer activities and help you enjoy the summer as you should.”

Butler looks at five summer activities that cause back injuries and offers ways to prevent them:

· Travel. Sitting for long periods on car rides or in cramped plane seats can do a number on your spine. “My advice is to bring extra support, such as a folded blanket or inflatable pillow for your lower back and neck,” Butler says. “Wear comfortable shoes that have lots of arch and ankle support. Take driving breaks to move your body during a long trip, and adjust your seat so you’re close to the steering wheel.

· Amusement parks. “People love to experience the rush of riding a rollercoaster, but sadly, their spines pay the price,” Butler says. “All those jerky, jolting movements can injure the neck and back, causing it to become misaligned. I’d advise anyone who already suffers from back or neck pain to steer clear of rollercoasters. If you decide to ride, make sure to follow all safety precautions and see your chiropractor for an adjustment after your trip.”

· Gardening and yard work. “Yard work involves a lot of bending, stooping, twisting, squatting, and lifting,” Butler says. “Combine all of those, and you’ve got the perfect recipe for a sore back and a misaligned spine. Warm up before an afternoon in the yard. Yoga, or any kind of stretching, and brisk walking are great ways to loosen up. When lifting, utilize your leg muscles, and hold objects close to the body. When mowing, avoid leaning far forward and take breaks.”

· Golf. When swinging a golf club, the lumbar spine undergoes a twisting motion, which can lead to disc herniation or chronic back pain. Butler says there are several ways to reduce the risk of lower back injury: proper stretching, core strengthening, and proper swing technique. “Also, it’s best not to carry your golf bag, which can weigh up to 30 or more pounds,” he says. “Use a pull-cart.”

· “Weekend warrior” pursuits. After being glued to an office chair for five days without any physical activity, Butler says it’s unwise on the weekend to engage in high-intensity sports or hard workouts. “Rather than risking back pain from a weekend of overexertion, he says, “get in 30 minutes of moderate exercise or more every day so you’re stronger and better conditioned.”

“A good rule of thumb is to ease into any physical activity you aren’t used to doing — especially after a long winter,” Butler says. “Listen to your body; if you feel pain or weakness, that’s your body telling you that it’s time to take a break. A healthy spine makes for a fun, pain-free summer.”

Deterioration of the Spine

New 4K Ultra HD Video Defines How the Human Spine Deteriorates

Watch the video here.

DEGENERATIVE DISC DISEASE describes the wear and tear of the disc. Degenerative disc disease is a misnomer for the reason that it sounds as though it’s a progressive and threatening condition. This process occurs naturally with age. However, it is not strictly degenerative and is not actually a disease. Degenerative disc disease can also be accelerated by a motor vehicle accident or labor and other repetitive activities, known as traumatic degeneration. The basic problem begins with a tear in the fibers that make up the annulus fibrosus. It is recognized that annular tears cause pain by excreting inflammatory chemicals that are caustic to nerve roots and neural elements. The break down and the collapse of the facet joints causes mechanical pain.

Classically, a patient with this condition complains of neck pain through the scapula (shoulder blade), which is exacerbated by sitting or standing. The pain is commonly reported as being deep, dull, and aching, or a boring pain, progressing distally from the neck into the arm in a nonspecific zone. This is as opposed to radiculopathy, which is an irritation of the nerve root. Pain, numbness, weakness, and +/– reflex changes of the arm might be present.

Loss of bowel or bladder control is an emergency. Seek immediate medical attention!

Traditional treatments include early motion, traction, physical therapy, massage, modalities, acupuncture, osteopathic manipulation, chiropractic care, pain management, activity avoidance, and activity with job modifications. Heat in the form of long, hot showers, sauna, and heat packs can help relieve pain. Application of cold packs and gels could also offer some relief. Medications in the classes of aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, muscle relaxants, oral steroids, antidepressants, and narcotics might be recommended. Wearing a brace for external stabilization could be helpful in the short term.

When the patient is less symptomatic, specific treatments such as cervical stabilization will often assist with the resumption of function and endurance. Yoga and Pilates may be used to strengthen core muscles, while Medx treatment might help to strengthen neck muscles.

Cervical or lumbar injections such as epidural steroid, facet blocks, or radiofrequency ablation may be recommended.

Cervical or lumbar spine surgical treatments include ACDF and posterior foraminotomy or decompression, fusion and instrumentation.

Prevention: While wear, tear, and break down of the discs is natural and unavoidable, certain factors will accelerate the process. Repetitive bending, lifting, twisting, reaching, vibration exposure, poor posture, poor body mechanics, weak abdominal and extensor muscles, smoking, and obesity can increase the rate of disc break down. An appreciation of the cervical facet joint’s anatomy could, specifically, help in the long-term preservation of neck function. Understanding the function, motion, and limitations of the facet joint can serve as a tool to help slow the process of wear and tear in the neck.

Keys to an Amazing Life: Secrets of the Cervical Spine

available at amazon.com for $6.99 American Dollars

Watch the video here.

In 2017, American GDP was estimated at 19.4 trillion dollars. With spine care costing Americans 135 billion dollars per year in the USA, that means one in $144 GDP (0.7%) dollars is spent on spine care. 2017 USA GDP is estimated at $19.4 trillion dollars.

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(18)30725-6/fulltext

Today, with this important book, internationally-renowned American spinal expert Dr. Kenneth Hansraj unlocks the secrets of your spine, and how learning to treat it with respect will vastly improve your physical, emotional and even mental life. It’s packed with brilliant illustrations, photographs and techniques for achieving optimal spinal and overall vibrant health!

The most painful problem in America isn’t the economy, trade, crime or foreign wars.

It’s our BACKS!

About Dr. Kenneth K. Hansraj

On the forefront of spinal surgery American surgeon Dr. Kenneth K. Hansraj is a spinal and orthopedic surgeon specializing in cervical, thoracic and lumbar procedures for example laminectomies and spinal fusions. Dr. Hansraj believes in tailoring the operation to the patient using the latest spine technologies.

Dr. Ken is the author of the internationally bestselling book, Keys to an Amazing Life: Secrets of the Cervical Spine, (January, 2013), which he was inspired to write based on this concept. Dr. Hansraj is also the author of Bloodless Spine Surgery: Pictures and Explanations. His goal with each of his books is to bring years of accumulated expert medical knowledge to the public at-large in an easy-to digest format and to help countless individuals with ongoing spinal and health issues.

Dr. Ken Hansraj is TV and media trained and has extensive experience with national outlets such as CNN, HLN, CBS, FOX, NBC, ABC, NPR and has been featured globally. Cision® estimates his current media impressions at 9 Billion.

6 Therapies To Alleviate Pain Linked To Diabetes And Other Health Issues

The complications associated with diabetes are many, and chronic pain is common for many who suffer from the disease – especially back pain.

Most adults experience back pain at some point in their lives, and almost half suffer neck pain. Usually, an injury or other musculoskeletal issue is associated with either affliction, although on occasion a disease may be linked to the problem as well.

Just as an example of the latter, researchers at the University of Sydney recently found that diabetics are at significantly higher risk of lower back pain and neck pain. While the report couldn’t establish a causal relationship between type 2 diabetes and back or neck pain, the research team pointed to preventable problems, such as obesity and lack of exercise, as contributing factors.

But whatever the source of any neck or back problem, finding that underlying cause is key to developing a treatment program that can both alleviate the pain and act as a form of prevention, says Dr. Bradford Butler, a chiropractor and author of The Blueprint for Back Pain Relief: The Essential Guide to Nonsurgical Solutions (www.drbradfordbutler.com).

“Most patients have a combination of problems causing their pain,” Butler says. “It’s very rare that just one thing needs to be treated.

“It doesn’t make sense to treat just the symptoms and not fix what is causing them. Many people, however, aren’t getting the correct therapy, so to them it’s no longer fixable. But it is – as well as preventable in the future with the right therapy.”

Butler has tips on treatments that can heal neck and back pain:

  • Acupuncture. Like chiropractic, acupuncture is a mystery to many people. “Its roots are deep in health and healing, and not in back pain alone,” Butler says. “More and more medical research is showing how incredibly effective it can be. Some studies show that it’s more effective than pain medications, and acupuncture produces actual results – it doesn’t just mask the symptoms.”
  • Chiropractic care. This a popular way to solve joint problems associated with almost all back and neck problems. “A spinal adjustment is the safest and most effective way to mobilize the joints,” Butler says. “Flexibility and range of motion of the affected segments is increased, disc circulation is improved and nerves function better.”
  • Massage therapy. “Massage is a powerful healing tool,” Butler says. “It helps to treat pain, inflammation, and spasm associated with back pain of all levels.” A highly trained massage therapist aids in breaking down scar tissue and increasing blood flow to the affected area, which accelerates healing while aiding the body in lymphatic drainage.
  • Neuromuscular reeducation. There are two different types of muscles that control the spine: voluntary and involuntary. “Voluntary muscles control global movements of your entire spine or region, movements such as bending and turning,” Butler says. “Involuntary muscles are controlled directly by the brain and central nervous system. Neuromuscular reeducation uses specific exercises and movements to stimulate your brain to retrain these involuntary muscles and make a better connection.”
  • Physical therapy. “Physical therapy helps increase range of motion, strengthens the spine against injury, and improves posture and gait,” Butler says. “Some people think about physical therapy only as it pertains to post-injury, post-surgical recovery, but it’s also critical to longevity.”
  • Spinal decompression. “This therapy has been a game-changer in the treatment of patients with back pain who have degenerated, bulging, or herniated discs,” Butler says. “It’s the most advanced nonsurgical treatment for discs. It can be used for discs in the neck or lower back.”

“Singular treatments rarely work,” Butler says. “A properly designed plan should include multiple therapies for most people if the goal is to fix the problem.”