Posts tagged with "salads"

West Jeff To-Go

West Jeff To-Go is a to go spot for food lovers in LA. This neighborhood eatery offers healthy, substantial food to-go with a secluded outdoor garden option for patrons to eat in. On their menu they offer salads, bowls, sandwiches, and a refreshing variety of vegan and gluten free options. The restaurant is located at 5162 W. Jefferson Blvd at the intersection of Sycamore Avenue and Jefferson Boulevard.

West Jeff To-Go opened on April 21st 2018 and they are off to a promising start with plenty five-star reviews on Yelp. Menu items consist of healthy and delicious dishes. The new eatery is a collaboration between two long-time film & TV caterers, Chef Teri Portugal-Gooden & Colleen Stewart, cooking out of a 2,000 square foot kitchen located on-site where they have been for over a decade. The branding is sleek, with nods to its feminine roots by way of menu names. “When branding the restaurant, I wanted to celebrate our feminine roots without making things obviously pink, or soft. Incorporating women’s names that were significant to us, and relative to the food has shown to resonate with our patrons. Everyone knows a Maria!” says Bryant Moscote, the driving force behind the restaurant’s marketing and front of the house operations.

The Adriana (bowl) is sliced brisket, charred zucchini, and chimichurri vinaigrette. The Maria bowl consists of pulled pork, golden BBQ sauce, and green slaw. Colleen’s Chili was excellent with carrots, celery, onion, toasted garlic, triple bean, tomato, and served on Brown Rice topped with diced onion and cheese.  All of their bowls are served with Brown Rice & Beans. There is also wide assortment of salads like the Charred Cauliflower, Quinoa Tabouli, and Roasted Potato!

The interior of the restaurant is cozy, making it easy to come in see, sample and order. West Jeff To-Go’s outdoor garden has a relaxing and inviting atmosphere with contemporary canopy lights. The garden is a favorite for guests to mingle with their friends and enjoy a nice meal, or book for a private party.

The staff delivers extraordinary service and will go through the entire menu with their guests. They are currently open from 11am to 5pm Monday through Friday and will eventually be open until 9pm. They are incorporating pop-up events on the weekend like movie nights in September, as well as breakfast!

You can check out their Instagram @westjefftogo for updates and also call West Jeff To-Go (323)935-5333 for their daily specials and catering. Share and Like West Jeff to Go on Facebook here.

ELLE Canada September Issue

ELLE Canada’s September 2018 issue features Tracee Ellis Ross as our cover star in a high-fashion photo shoot inspired by the best of the fall 2018 runways. In a playful and politically charged interview, Ellis Ross—who was recently nominated for an Emmy for her role on hit sitcom Black-ish—opens up about her love of fashion, growing up with Diana Ross, what she does with her downtime (including her secret to the best salads) and how she really feels about aging.

“I don’t want to feel like I’m hostage to an Instagram version of myself. My belief is that all these lines on my face and neck and the softness in my legs and my body are evidence of a life lived.”

Other issue highlights:

• Trend Report: Every trend we’re obsessed with this fall.

• ELLE Guide: How to create and define your own signature style.

• Feature: Are you being financially unfaithful to your partner?

The September issue of ELLE Canada, featuring Tracee Ellis Ross, hits newsstands on August 6, 2018.

FOOD SAFETY TIPS

11 food safety tips to pack for spring break

Whether you spend spring break partying in a city, exploring a different country or getting some R&R at home, don’t let food safety take a vacation. “Spring break is the perfect time to make memories with family and friends and Stop Foodborne Illness wants to make sure it’s the FUN MEMORIES that fill up your social media,” says Stop Foodborne Illness CEO, Deirdre Schlunegger.

Maintaining basic food safety standards, like washing hands, and adding some travel-specific practices is the best way to ensure foodborne illness won’t interrupt a fun getaway. Check out the Stop Foodborne Illness top tips for food safety during spring break.

All-inclusive resorts have many perks; they are touted as safer, more affordable, ideal for partying and usually include 24/7 buffets. Having unlimited access to food and drink is convenient, but can be potentially dangerous. Buffets serve large amounts of food over long periods of time, meaning there are more opportunities for food to not be kept at consistent, correct temperatures. Additionally, everyone shares the same serving utensils, increasing the risk of spreading pathogens. Since many all-inclusive resorts also have sit-down dining options on site, Stop Foodborne Illness recommends avoiding the buffet when possible and following these tips when it’s not.

• There’s always the possibility that food has not been held at proper temperatures – cold foods (salads, cold cuts, dressings) should be cold and hot foods (soups, meats, fish) should be hot. Any food that’s served at room temperature, and isn’t supposed to be, is within the temperature “danger zone” where bacteria can thrive.

• If you’ve gotten away to a warmer climate, remember the one-hour rule. Any perishable foods that have been sitting out beyond one hour when the temperature is higher than 90° F, is not safe to consume. (It’s 2 hours, if the temperature is below 90° F.)

• Another source of contamination is when food is mishandled by people with unclean hands. If you see something, say something. Don’t assume anything. And, of course, after a day’s activities, be sure to wash your own hands before eating.

• Fresh fruit and vegetables from the buffet can be a great poolside snack but don’t forget to wash and peel the tasty treat before eating. If you’re in an area with unsafe water, wash the produce with bottled or filtered water.

Eating and drinking can be some of the best things about travelling abroad. While “going local” is a delicious way to experience a new cuisine, it can also be an easier way to contract foodborne illness. Stop encourages travelers to be adventurous, but smart when it comes to consuming food in different countries.

Street food is a great way to experience local culture, but often, stalls don’t have the same hygiene standards as restaurants that cater to tourists. Stop Foodborne Illness recommends being aware of this difference and making wise choices when enjoying dishes from local restaurants or street stands.

• Avoid establishments where the food handlers don’t practice good hygiene, such as tying back their hair, wearing protective gloves and having clean hands and fingernails.

Be selective when choosing foods. Avoid raw milk and raw milk cheeses, and other raw foods—including undercooked meat and seafood, and uncooked vegetables —as well as foods that require a lot of handling before serving.

• Be extra cautions when visiting a remote destination. Turn up the food safety dial a notch; even though you may enjoy certain foods and beverages at home—like rare meat or runny eggs—it’s better to avoid questionable foods while in a different country. (Being sick in a language you don’t know can really complicate matters.)

As they say, half the fun is getting there! When you’re road tripping, in a rental or hopping on a plane, make sure you arrive at your destination safely with safe snacking habits.

• Sanitize tray tables, seat armrests and door handles with an 60% alcohol-based wipe. These frequently touched areas are generally made of plastic, a nonporous material that allows germs to live on longer, and have a higher risk of spreading foodborne illness.

• Keep food out of the danger zone. Make sure cold food stays cold—at or below 40°F—by packing it in coolers with frozen gel packs or ice. Stop Foodborne Illness suggests packing beverages in one cooler and perishable foods in another since you are likely to grab beverages most often while on the road. Since hot food needs to stay hot—at or above 140°F, Stop Foodborne Illness suggests passing on hot foods and opting instead for peanuts, and other nuts (including nut butters), jelly, crackers, chips, dried fruit, baked goods such as cookies or muffins, granola bars, popcorn, and whole fresh fruits like bananas, apples, and oranges.

• Rinse all fresh produce under running tap water (and patting it dry) before packing it in a cooler, including produce with peel-away skins or rinds. Follow this checklist to make sure coolers are packed properly.

Not going anywhere? Enjoy a relaxing staycation at home but don’t let your food safety practices go on a break. The best way to prevent the spread of foodborne illness is to continue following proper food safety. Wash your hands for 20 seconds before handling food, cook food to a safe internal temperature and clean cooking equipment and surfaces after preparing raw foods. Visit website for more food safety tips.

About Stop Foodborne Illness

Stop Foodborne Illness is a national nonprofit, public health organization dedicated to preventing illness and death from foodborne pathogens by promoting sound food safety policy and best practices, building public awareness, and assisting those impacted by foodborne illness. For more food safety tips please visit here. If you think you have been sickened from food, contact your local health professional. You may subscribe to receive Stop Foodborne Illness e-Alerts and eNews here.

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Gift Guide × Health Conscious Foodie

(Photo credit— VeganSmart Instagram)

Each holiday is filled with homemade recipes and delicious snacks, making it a foodie’s favorite time of year. This year, instead of gifting the foodie in your life one of their favorite treats, why not step it up by introducing them to new, healthy flavors their taste buds will love. 
 
Below are some healthy picks that are sure to shake up every foodie’s holiday!

 
For the foodies who love spicy:

MINA Classic Moroccan Harissa, Shakshuka and Tagine’s spice up the flavor of your food, add nutrients to your health and easily up your cooking game. What can be used as a sauce, dip or spread, Mina Moroccan sauces are versatile in its ability to add heat to any dish, as well as make Moroccan cuisine quick and easy.


For the foodies who like a little crunch:

The newest superfood, Wine RayZyn, is a hand-harvested wine grape naturally toasted and caramelized, keeping the skin and seeds intact to provide unprecedented amounts of fiber, nutrients, and antioxidants—not to mention, a delicious crunch. RayZyn can be added to all your salads, baked goods, side dishes and more!

 

 
For the trendy foodies:

Olitalia, an Italian-based and globally loved olive oil and vinegar company, is introducing their line of balsamic-based Drink Vinegar to the U.S. market just in time for the holidays. Available on Amazon and nationwide in October, Drink Vinegar helps improve metabolism, enhance digestion, serves as an excellent source of Potassium, Calcium, Vitamin B2 and B3 AND can restore your skin’s natural beauty and radiance.

 

 
For the foodies always on the go:

VeganSmart, a line of delicious, plant-based nutritional shake, with no dairy, eggs, soy, artificial sweeteners, flavors, colors, preservatives, cholesterol, acesulfame-K, MSG, and zero trans-fat, is the perfect way to stay full and keep your energy up during the busy holiday season. Containing 5 different non-GMO plant based proteins, VeganSmart provides the essential amino acids for building and repairing tissue and muscle.