Posts tagged with "’ritas"

RITAS × DAN MAGRO

Mistletoe Kiss

Not sure why kissing under a plant is a holiday tradition…but we’re good as long as a cocktail is involved.
 
Ingredients:
1oz London Dry Gin
0.5oz Fresh Lime Juice
0.5oz Vermont Maple Syrup
Mint and Fresh Cranberries (for garnish)
RITAS’ Cran-Ber-RITA
 
Directions: 
Fill a shaker with ice and add gin, lime juice, and maple syrup.
 
Shake vigorously for 20 seconds and strain into a coupe glass.
 
Top off with RITAS’ Cran-Ber-RITA and garnish with mint and fresh cranberries.
 

Ebenezer Rita 

Holidays got you feeling sour? The Ebenezer Rita will have you saying bah humbug to any drama!
 
Ingredients:
1.5oz Bourbon
1oz ounce Fresh Lemon Juice
3oz RITAS’ Cran-Ber-RITA
Rosemary Sprig (for garnish)
 
Directions: 
Fill a pint glass with ice and add all ingredients except rosemary.
 
Stir well.
 
Strain into a rocks glass over a large ice cube. 
 
Top off with more RITAS’ Cran-Ber-RITA if needed and garnish with a fresh sprig of rosemary.
 
Feeling extra festive? Make ice cubes out of RITAS’ Cran-Ber-RITA and add fresh cranberries and tiny sprigs of rosemary.
 

Home for the Holidays

A cocktail so sweet and smooth, even your cousins won’t be able to complain. Pairs perfectly with a warm fire and hot gossip.
 
Ingredients:
1.5oz Blanco Tequila
0.5oz Vermont Maple Syrup
1.5oz Lime Juice
RITAS’ Cran-Ber-RITA
Pinch of Fresh Ground Cinnamon
Cinnamon Stick, Fresh Cranberries (for garnish)
 
Directions: 
Fill a shaker with ice and add tequila, maple syrup, and lime juice.
 
Shake vigorously for 20 seconds and strain into a collins glass over large ice cubes.
 
Top off with RITAS’ Cran-Ber-RITA and garnish with a cinnamon stick, and fresh cranberries.
 
*Carefully* light the end of the cinnamon stick ablaze, then quickly blow out. Gently rest the smoking cinnamon stick on the edge of the cocktail to send a seasonal scent wafting through the air.
 

*Credit: RITAS and Dan Magro, Author of Suck It Up: Extraordinary Cocktails for Everyday People.

Ritas, beer, spirit, libations, Thanksgiving, drink responsibly, 360 MAGAZINE,

RITAS × THANKSGIVING

ON THE FENCE ABOUT BRINGING BAE HOME FOR THANKSGIVING? RITAS SAYS “GO FOR IT”

RITAS is Footing the Bill to Fly Your S.O. Home for the Holiday

Maybe it’s their table manners. Maybe it’s their face tattoo. Whatever it is, 70% of Americans aged between 25-34, are scared or anxious about bringing their new partner home to meet the family. Once RITAS learned these results, they said “Hold my Cran-Ber-RITA,” and took action.

RITAS believes you should #NeverApologize for who you are or who you’re bringing to the Thanksgiving table. So, to celebrate the seasonal return of Cran-Ber-RITA, they’re offering couples a boost of cash-powered confidence: RITAS will cover the cost of a ticket to fly your S.O. home for family dinner. Plus, they’ll throw in a case of Cran-Ber-RITA, so neither of you have to arrive empty-handed.

Watch real-life stories, curated by RITAS, showcasing the value of taking the next step with your partner (and your family) this Thanksgiving

“Whether it’s a conversation, a drink, or a person, you should never apologize for what you bring to the table,” said Chelsea Phillips, VP of Beyond Beer Brands at Anheuser Busch. “RITAS believes in this wholeheartedly, so we are removing travel as a barrier so our fans can take that leap and celebrate who they love with their family.”

RITAS also teamed up with New York City-based Relationship Expert Susan Winter to advise couples through this time of heightened nerves.

“The holidays are the time we get together with those closest to our hearts. Why not magnify the joy by introducing your significant other to your family on this special occasion,” said Winter. “While the first introduction may seem scary and uncertain, the benefits far outweigh any temporary fears. Trust that your family will see the reasons why you love your mate and join in this celebration with you.”

To take part, head to @RITAS Instagram page and tell the world what you’ll #NeverApologize for loving about your boo. Make sure to include #NeverApologize and #Sweepstakes between November 14 – November 19. 20 lucky winners will be selected and notified on November 20, scoring a $1,500 voucher to put toward a flight of their choice and will be provided with a case of Cran-Ber-RITA so they don’t have to show up to dinner empty-handed.*

Cran-Ber-RITA is packed with a sweet and tart flavor and has returned for the fall-winter season after a long hiatus and an outcry from fans to see it back on shelves. Cran-Ber-RITA is available in 8 FL OZ, 12 OZ, 16 OZ, and 25 OZ cans in selected retailers nationwide for a limited time. For more information on Cran-Ber-RITA, visit www.theritas.com or follow the conversation on social @TheRITAS.

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*For a full list of the official contest rules and entry directions, visit www.theritas.com/meettheparents after November 14, 2019.

Cran-Ber-Rita, Anheuser-Busch, RITAS, 360 MAGAZINE

CRAN-BER-RITA IS BACK

After a Three Year Hiatus, RITAS is Putting its #1 Most Requested Flavor on Social Media Back on Shelf 

The fans requested, and RITAS answered. That’s right: Cran-Ber-Rita has returned, just in time to liven up any and all upcoming fall and winter plans.

Pumpkin spice and apple cider are great and everything, but those flavors can’t party quite like Cran-Ber-Rita. Indulge with a can of cran and witness your basic fall plans become anything but boring. Apple picking, visits to the pumpkin patch, even turkey dinner can be paired with limited edition Cran-Ber-Rita for a cornucopia of flavor. Go grab some cran and #NeverApologize for adding flair to your Thanksgiving table.

“It’s time that Cran-Ber-Rita has a proper comeback under our new RITAS brand,” said Chelsea Phillips, Vice President of Beyond Beer Brands at Anheuser-Busch. “We know our fans have been waiting for this moment and there’s no better way to be unapologetically you this season than with a can of cran!”

Packed with a sweet and tart flavor, the 8 FL OZ. can has an ABV of 8% and is also available in the12oz bottle variety pack and 25oz cans. Cran-Ber-Rita is available in select retailers nationwide for a limited-time only. You’ll want to grab one quick before they’re gone.

For more information on Cran-Ber-Rita, visit www.theritas.com or follow the conversation on social @TheRITAS.

ABOUT RITAS

As part of the continued innovation from world-class brewmasters from the legacy of America’s most-popular beers, Anheuser-Busch launched RITAS, originally marketed as Bud Light Lime Lime-A-Rita, in 2012. RITAS is the first brand in the Anheuser-Busch InBev portfolio to champion women and in 2019 launched their #NeverApologize campaign to champion women for loving who they are and loving what they drink.

For more information on RITAS, visit www.theritas.com, and join the squad by following RITAS on Facebook, @TheRITAS on Twitter, @RITAS on Instagram and #HAVEARITA.

ABOUT ANHEUSER-BUSCH

For more than 165 years, Anheuser-Busch has been woven into the cultural fabric of the United States, carrying on a legacy of brewing great-tasting, high-quality beers that have satisfied beer drinkers for generations. Today, we own and operate 23 breweries, 14 distributorships and 23 agricultural and packaging facilities, and have more than 18,000 colleagues across the United States. We are home to several of America’s most recognizable beer brands, including Budweiser, Bud Light, Michelob ULTRA and Stella Artois, as well as a number of regional brands that provide beer drinkers with a choice of the best-tasting craft beers in the industry.

From responsible drinking programs and emergency drinking water donations to industry-leading sustainability efforts, we are guided by our unwavering commitment to supporting the communities we call home.

For more information, visit www.anheuser-busch.com or follow Anheuser-Busch on LinkedInTwitterFacebook and Instagram

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”