Posts tagged with "retail"

Swatch, 360 MAGAZINE, swatch watches, 360

SWATCH BIG BOLD

Inspired by bold ideas, designed for even bolder personalities: We are proud to introduce our brand new Swatch BIG BOLD collection featuring six different watch models. With a kick from urban streetwear, each BIG BOLD is a statement piece boasting a striking 47mm watchcase. This product line calls out for those who are not afraid to put themselves upfront and who are proud to be different. Swatch BIG BOLD is an attitude, a mindset, a way of being in the world. It is a kind of swagger that is irreverent, confident, and entirely unexpected. It longs for those that embrace being noticed.

Brian McKnight One-Night-Only at Encore Theater

Brian McKnight Set to Take the Stage at Encore Theater For One-Night-Only Performance, July 19

Tickets On Sale Friday, May 3 At 10 a.m.

This July, GRAMMY-nominated singer-songwriter and producer Brian McKnight will make his Wynn Las Vegas debut with a one-night-only engagement at the Encore Theater. The celebrated R&B performer will bring his greatest hits to the stage on Friday, July 19 at 8 p.m. Tickets for this performance go on sale Friday, May 3 at 10 a.m. PDT.

Over the past 25 years, McKnight has sold more than 30 million albums worldwide and has released 19 albums to date, with several going two- or three-times platinum. McKnight has been nominated for 16 GRAMMY Awards, including “R&B Album” for Back at One and “R&B Song” for “Love of My Life.” McKnight is also the recipient of American Music Awards, Soul Train Awards, the NAACP Image and Blockbuster Awards, as well as a Billboard Songwriter of The Year.

Ticket Information

  • Dates: July 19, 2019
  • Public On-Sale: Friday, May 3 at 10 a.m. PDT
  • Price: $49.95-$115 plus applicable fees
  • Points Of Purchase: Wynn Las Vegas Box Office (702-770-9966) or WynnLasVegas.com

Outside of singing, McKnight is a multi-instrumentalist who is trained to play the piano, guitar, bass, drums, percussions, trombone, tuba, trumpet and flugelhorn. For more information on Brian McKnight, visit McKnight360.com.

About Wynn Las Vegas

Wynn Resorts is the recipient of more Forbes Travel Guide Five Star Awards than any other independent hotel company in the world and was once again named the best resort in Nevada on Condé Nast Traveler’s 2019 “Gold List,” a title received for the eleventh time. Wynn and Encore Las Vegas consist of two luxury hotel towers with a total of 4,750 spacious hotel rooms, suites and villas. The resort features approximately 192,000 square feet of casino space, 21 signature dining experiences, 11 bars, two award-winning spas, approximately 290,000 square feet of meeting and convention space, approximately 160,000 square feet of retail space as well as two theaters, two nightclubs, a beach club and recreation and leisure facilities. Wynn Las Vegas recently unveiled Wynn Plaza, a Strip-front expansion that offers a collection of world-renowned luxury, contemporary, and lifestyle brands. For more information on Wynn and Encore Las Vegas, visit press.wynnlasvegas.com, or follow on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

AIRism

UNIQLO x alexanderwang AIRism Collection is now available in stores and online at Uniqlo.com!

The 2nd collection with Alexander Wang builds on the LifeWear commitment to making life better by joining the exceptional functionality of UNIQLO’s innovative AIRism fabric with Alexander Wang’s sleek styling. It includes 11 AIRism styles for women and 4 AIRism styles for men of various colorways, made out of the iconic light fabric that is comfortable and smooth for every day wear.

Cultivating Company Culture

TRAVEL JOURNALIST THOMAS WILMER INTERVIEWS 360 MAGAZINE PUBLISHER VAUGHN LOWERY

Small to medium sized business often fall short due to high turnover. Vaughn Lowery, Publisher of 360 Magazine, provides listeners with first-hand knowledge on the ever-shifting world of digital publishing and content creation through a youthful lens. Likewise with his innate ability to be accessible, he speaks to working in tandem with emerging generations and how their input could be detrimental to the survival of a brand.

LISTEN HERE

An Additional Conversation with 360 Magazine’s Publisher Vaughn Lowery

By Tara McDonough

If Vaughn Lowery was asked what his idea of success was 10 years ago, his answer would be very different from what it is today. He may have said that success means doing what he loves to do, being accomplished, or having a certain amount of material things.

“Success to me now is having a purpose in life and feeling passionate and fulfilled by it,” says Lowery.

Lowery got his first taste of the industry while interning for Vibe Magazine while on Summer vacation from Cornell University. His sister drove him into New York City every morning to drop him off and always advised him to be the first one at the office. One morning Lowery found himself alone with the publisher of the magazine at the time, Keith Clinkscales, which gave him the opportunity to speak with him one-on-one. It was due to his sister’s advice that he got the chance to do what no other intern would normally get to do.

After finishing up at Cornell in just three years, Lowery became an executive trainee with Saks Fifth Avenue. He was able to get along with everyone in the office and was doing great when he was called into his boss’s office one afternoon.

“She told me I was in the wrong business; that I was very charismatic and should try acting,” Lowery says, “but, I liked the path I was on at that time.”

It wasn’t until Lowery was asked by someone connected to the talent industry if he was a model that he truly considered breaking into the talent industry. Shortly after taking professional photos and getting them out to agencies, Lowery ended up with Ford Models. From there he did photoshoots, tv commercials, and ad campaigns, all while still working in outside sales at Aetna US Healthcare. Once he began modelling full time his face was in the pages of GQ, Harper’s Bazaar, Vogue, and Gap. By being around people of all different positions, primarily in the magazine publishing industry, Lowery came to understand how content was produced. It was right before the recession hit while he was living in LA that Lowery made the transition from modelling to the publishing industry.

It was his experience in modelling that inspired Lowery’s creation of the 360 Magazine. While working on any given shoot, Lowery was often one of just three or less black men. Often times he was the only black man on a set which drew his attention to the lack of representation in the media industry. Lowery’s goal for the 360 Magazine was that it would fill this niche and promote diversity across the publishing world, specifically the covers of its magazines.

For those wanting to work in the media industry, specifically in the publishing world, Lowery suggests starting from the ground up.

“Being self taught and learning as you go is something you need to be open to,” says Lowery, “Ask tons of questions, and learn everything you can from every position.”

Lowery warns that it’s important to be open and cordial to everyone, because you don’t know when your paths will cross again. Making connections and using them is how most people gain opportunities. He also adds that just by hanging out with people you’ll always learn something that you can apply to aspects of your work.  

Things in the industry have been changing and becoming more digitally focused since the beginning of 360 Magazine’s launch. The magazine was started during a time of e-zines, so it’s not a surprise that the website came first. Lowery had experience with creating websites from a young age so the move from print to digital was natural for him. It was clear to him where the industry was going.

“Print was getting costly, bookstores were looking dilapidated and even Barnes and Noble was focusing on their version of the tablet, the Nook,” says Lowery, “All the magazines were looking alike anyway.”

Print was still important though. Besides the fact that advertising agencies want to see a physical copy of a magazine before working with them, print is taken more seriously due to its cost. Other companies will be aware that a certain magazine has the funds to support itself if they have a print copy to show for it.

360 Magazine printed their first issue in 2009, but it was costly. Lowery began thinking that there had to be some other way to work with print. It was then that he decided to do print on demand publications. 360 Magazine linked with Blurb, which allowed anyone to order a print copy of the magazine right from our website. They’ve been distributing to them for 9 years now.

The magazine’s estimated circulation, which is based on print, is 110,000 from print on demand. This number doesn’t tend to move much, but most people end up reading 360 Magazine’s online articles through WordPress.

When asked what makes a media contributor most marketable, Lowery says that in this industry you need a social following and the ability to network. Being accessible and having a portfolio of published work is a great place to start as well.

Do it all,” Lowery says, “monetize, write, take photos, be on time, and take initiatives.”

The hardest thing about the industry in Lowery’s opinion is breaking into it and surviving on freelance jobs along the way. Writers should be prepared to sacrifice mentally, physically and financially. While working for a publication, Lowery says that writers need to do what they can to become a valuable asset to them. That way, a publication will be more likely to keep you on board and help you in the future.

As for internship positions at 360 Magazine, Lowery aims to teach interns everything that he didn’t learn. He’s assigns articles for interns to write, pushes them to network, has them do coverage and teaches them how to get published or to self-publish.

“We teach interns how to be resourceful and find themselves in the organization,” says Lowery.

When interns can bring business to the magazine, the magazine will bring business to them. Special assignment opportunities are available for interns who finish their program and are still looking to remain involved. Lowery says that while the magazine is specifically looking to groom editors, that if a publication wants to really pop, then they have to have a revolving door.

When asked what goals he has for the future of 360 Magazine, Lowery responded that he aims to keep it three dimensional with podcasts and web series.

“I want to be able to put the brand out to different countries and places in America,” says Lowery, Local presences would strengthen us.”

He also says that he’s interested in the possibility of a reality spin off or docu-series, as well as introducing more formal programs for educational purposes.

VAUGHN LOWERY:
360 Magazine
LinkedIn
Joe boxer TV Appearance
America’s Next Top Model Appearance
Sundance Film Trailer Appearance

Vaughn Lowery, art, 360 magazine, design, entertainer, Male model

New Robotics

New Robotics: Shifting Business Models

IDTechEx Research analyzes the changing trends in the robotics industry in their report New Robotics and Drones 2018-2038: Technologies, Forecasts, Players, as new and emerging firms challenge the norm.

Machine makers in many established markets sell their machines directly or through dealer networks. At times, they create additional revenue streams by offering technical after-sales support. They often hope that the installed base of their machines together with limited incompatibility with competitors’ products provides some lock-in mechanism. They also seek to build-in some technology obsolescence into their product cycles. Some also provide finance, directly or jointly with a finance entity, to help potential customers overcome the barrier of the upfront cost.

Many traditional robot suppliers fit the description above. Integrators often install a robotic or automated solution and provide after-sale technical support. They make it difficult to integrate competitors’ robots with their solutions and offer regular hardware and software updates.

New and emerging robotic firms, however, do not easily fit this bill. They are, in fact, challenging the established norms. This is sometimes through will and sometimes through necessity. The trend towards alternative models is evident across all sectors that new robotics seeks to impact. This includes retail, agriculture, logistics, delivery, security, cleaning, transport, and so on.

In the next few paragraphs, we outline some trends and drives in each sector. To get the complete picture please see the IDTechEx Research New Robotics and Drones 2018-2038: Technologies, Forecasts, Players. This report is unique in its depth and breadth. It covers both existing as well as emerging applications. Indeed, it provides 21-year forecasts in value and unit numbers for 46 categories, painting a comprehensive and quantitative picture of this major transformation.

Agriculture

Autonomous robots can provide automated precision weeding. Robotic intelligent implementation can provide precision spraying or weeding, too. The upfront machine or fleet costs are often high today. The technology risk for end users is also high. Users are often afraid that expert operators and repair persons will be needed. They worry that the technology is not tried and tested, especially in an agricultural environment. They fear that the technology is likely to rapidly evolve, exposing them to serious obsolescence risks. Crucially, they require seasonal services and are accustomed to paying wages and not making significant capital investments into machines with low utilization rates.

To address these challenges, many companies are positioning as a RaaS- robotic as a service. They essentially become weeding service providers. They operate or monitor their own machines. They charge the customer per acre, a metric with which they are likely familiar. They absorb the technology risk. Crucially, they give their robots extensive field practice and will have the chance to gather data and feedback. This is important because the design of these products and services is still in a state of flux with many further iterations anticipated.

This positioning changes the nature of their business. Companies will require additional working capital and staff to absorb the service costs and to offer a sufficiently scaled service network. They cannot simply build to order to balance their cash flows. This is where partnerships will become important. This is also where early capital investments in case of start-ups become a necessity, as most will operate heavily in the red in the early years of their operations.

With time and technology maturity the model may revert back to a traditional arrangement, or will it? This is an ongoing debate because traditional heavy agricultural machine makers will also need to adapt their models. This is inevitable because as vehicles become more autonomous, in navigation and task, the machine becomes the services, blurring the boundary between equipment sales and service provision.  The whole value chains will need to adjust and even the dealers will need to find their sweet spots evolving their technical support into full-blown remote robot operations. To learn more please read New Robotics and Drones 2018-2038: Technologies, Forecasts, Players.

Last mile delivery

Many small robots are appearing worldwide to solve the productivity problem present at the last stage of the delivery process: the last mile. These small slow robots autonomously deliver small payloads to their final destinations. At the level of individual machines, there are highly unproductive. However, at the level of a large fleet, without a driver overhead per unit, they can become productive and commercially viable.

Here two business models have emerged. Some follow the traditional model of trying to sell their robots. Others are positioning as delivery firms staffed mainly by autonomous robots. This latter model is adopted for many good reasons. It is envisioned that the hardware will in the future become modular, standardized, and highly commoditized.  Essentially the same fate as consumer drones awaits the hardware platform. Competing in such a business would not be easy for start-ups, especially those based in California and similar start-up hubs.

Crucially, the robot companies require practice data. This is because they will need to improve their delivery and navigation algorithms so that one day they can operate large fleets in complex environments with high-speed units. The data loop would be cut if they just sold a machine and walked out. The data acquisition is a fundamental part of product improvement without which the company would likely stall. It will also open up the door to offering high value-added analytics services.

The technology is still immature. As such, it will require close monitoring and likely regular manual interventions to fix issues. As such, most players will, as a minimum, be forced to add a strong 24/7 service element to their business.

To learn more, please see the IDTechEx Research report Mobile Robots and Drones in Material Handling and Logistics 2018-2038. This report is focused on all aspects of mobile robotics in material handling and logistics. In particular, we consider the following: automated guided vehicles and carts (AGVs and AGCs); autonomous mobile vehicles and carts/units; mobile picking robots; last mile delivery ground robots (droids) and drones; and autonomous trucks and light delivery vans (level 4 and level 5 automation).

Logistics

Robotic firms are emerging to enable autonomous robotic picking. These robots combine autonomous mobility with autonomous picking skills. Here, too, companies are frequently positioning themselves as a service provider, charging a monthly subscription fee or a $ per pick rate.

In this case, too, robotic companies require the data. Their picking algorithms are based on deep learning and as such without training data their product roadmap will likely stall. This would be very dangerous to their business prospects because today’s generation of products only manages to slowly pick regularly-shaped known objects in simple environments. The future, however, is fast picking of novel randomly-shaped items in complex environments. To traverse this competency gap, data will be indispensable. The users too will require ongoing support. They too will prefer not to absorb the technology risk, especially since the technology – both hardware and software – are rapidly evolving. As such, a service model can prove win-win.

To learn more please visit www.IDTechEx.com/mobile.

Security

Autonomous mobile robots are developed to perform various security-related tasks. These robots are being designed for indoor, outdoor and even rugged terrain operation. They are essentially sensors-on-a-wheel. Some versions can have more than 50-onboard sensors, generating nearly 100 terabytes of data per year per machine. These robots can be deployed wherever some type of security and monitoring is required.

Here, too, firms are not always adopting an outright equipment sales model. It is common to seek a subscription model for giving customers access to the machine, the interface, the data plan, the 24/7 support, etc. Here, too, such arrangements can be win-win. The suppliers will retain that crucial data loop in their business models, enabling them to improve their products, for example, by offering specialized algorithms able to detect, recognize, and analyze specific situations, e.g., from car number plate recognition to detection of dangerous gas leakages in an industrial site. Customers, too, will take this arrangement because it is closer to an end solution and makes it easier for them to test the technology and the new ways of working that it might enable.

To learn more please see New Robotics and Drones 2018-2038: Technologies, Forecasts, Players. This report provides detailed technology analysis, assessing the trends in performance and price of key enabling hardware and software technologies whilst considering likely technology development roadmaps. We will also profile the key companies and innovative entities working on new robotics and drones.

Retail

Autonomous robots are also finding their way into retail stores, seeking to automate tedious tasks. In particular, they are being offered essentially as automated data acquisition tools, capturing data about items on the shelves with higher speed and accuracy than humans.

Here firms are positioning as full solution providers. This has many advantages. This future-proofs their business against hardware commoditization. They can accumulate hard-to-obtain and hard-to-copy knowhow and data which can then underpin their value-added data analytics services. Their customers too will be interested in a final solution and not another alien technology looking for a problem to solve. At the end of the day, they are interested only in an impact on the bottom line, be it higher stock availability, better stock positioning on shelves, or leaner inventories. As such, data-centric service-orientated models can be win-win propositions.

This shift towards non-traditional business models permeates every sector. It is happening even with cars where the rise of mobility is fueling serious debates about the future of mobility and the role of autonomous taxi fleets and shared facilities. In general, even if the business models are not radically redrawn, the profit pool within the value chain will be re-balanced. This will change the winners and losers and will demand that all participants begin looking ahead and planning now.

To learn more, please visit www.IDTechEx.com/robotics or contact research@IDTechEx.com.

IDTechEx guides your strategic business decisions through its Research, Consultancy and Events services, helping you profit from emerging technologies. Find out more at www.IDTechEx.com.

Chris Lake × Fisher

By Michelle Pisnoy × Vaughn Lowery

6,000 EDM-loving college students filed into the Shrine Expo Hall Thursday prepared to dance the night away. The floor and balcony were packed as Chris Lake and Fisher took to the stage at their sold out show. Throughout the evening, a horde of fans pulsed to every beat the B2B DJ’s created.

At 10:00 pm, the mob of music lovers got rambunctious in anticipation of their performance. Minutes afterwards, the lights were dimmed and the audience began to cheer. Bright lights flashed, the beat began to intensify and the EDM lovers got even rowdier. Fisher and Chris Lake came out and started to perform mixes of different songs. The duo kept the audience engaged by switching between different beats and songs like “Crowd Control.” As soon as the track commenced, the fans began jumping up and down as well as singing along to the lyrics.

Chris Lake then played hit song, “Turn Off the Lights,” featuring Alexis Roberts. The LED lighting technology was in succinct to every beat of the record. At times, almost blinded the hypersensitive congregation, but they didn’t appear to mind. The night came to a culmination when Fisher played “Losing It.” He added synthetic melodies which made it more enchanting than the studio version. The crowd absolutely lost it, singing at the top of their lungs until the lights turned back on.

4 Fulfillment Details to Look for in 2019

If there’s one shining light guiding e-retailers in an industry both fueled and marred by the details, it’s to focus on the customer experience. Though everything technically affects the customer experience to some degree, nothing plays a central role in satisfying customers more than the fulfillment process.

So it makes sense that these four fulfillment details to look for in 2019 all directly enhance customer satisfaction and shopping convenience.

Let’s learn more about what’s in store for this year and beyond.

Heavy Investments in AI and Automation

It’s clear that fast and affordable shipping is the new standard in fulfillment. But for retailers to meet these standards they’ll have to achieve automation at scale — things like robot-operated warehouses, self-driving trucks, and drones. JD.com is one company after Amazon that’s investing heavily in these areas. The Chinese retailer’s already operating humanless warehouses of the future, and completed their first government-approved drone delivery in Indonesia in early January.

Meanwhile, DHL is investing $300 million to quadruple robots in their warehouses this year, and Uniqlo announced in late 2018 that they were investing over $770 million in automating its warehouse and distribution system. Top titans like Amazon, Walmart, Zappos, UPS, and FedEx already operate automated warehouses, but as long as the automation race is ongoing, so too will these companies’ developments.

Lenient Return Processes

Brands like Ikea, Amazon, Target, Walmart, Costco, Zappos and Nordstrom all have success in common, but they also have customer-friendly — some would say exceedingly lenient — return policies. These two things aren’t mutually exclusive.

Reverse logistics is an absolute mess for the typical online business — eating into profits and making operating margins hard to assess. Look for companies to develop better systems to facilitate returns, process returned products and improve their quality of shipping to reduce the number of defective goods. This will coincide with brands adopting more lenient returns policies, as well as leading with them in their promotional tactic. After all, this is a great way to acquire new customers, curb cart abandonment rates and increase average order value. Of course, brands will need to take measures to address fraud and/or abuse as they change their terms and conditions.

Subscription-Based Ordering for Everyday Products

Regardless of how material we are, we all use and need certain products on a daily basis. The thought of not having any toothpaste left before going to sleep, running out of toilet paper at the wrong time, or not have any groceries in the house when you want to prepare a meal is certainly offputting. This is why the subscription e-commerce market has grown by more than 100 percent per year over the past five years.

While subscription e-commerce is nothing new (we all remember Dollar Shave Club’s viral takeoff), we’ve seen other gems like Blue Apron and Birchbox come about in recent years. We’ll continue to see more of these subscription-based models, as well recurring order options and monthly boxes for everyday items offered by stores ranging from those that sell beauty products from home to big-name brands. Consumers, always looking for more convenience and less ‘one-off’ errands will respond positively.

Checkout-Free Retail

While automation at scale will need to occur to power what’s growing steadily into a $5 trillion global market, it’s unlikely some customers will ever be satisfied with delivery timeframes. Further, complications like package theft and damage in transit aren’t going away overnight. This sets the table for a lot more check-out free retail stores. Amazon Go’s experiment appears to be successful, with allegedly thousands more to come.

As Forbes notes, plenty of other retailers are getting involved as well — this includes GoodHousekeeping Lab via their Mall of America pop-up shop, Alibaba’s supermarket chain Hema, as well as Bingobox and AVA Retail. Meanwhile companies like Zippin, Standard Cognition and Trigo are providing the solutions to accomplish this.

Checkout-free stores will be the ultimate commercial win-win. Retailers deal with less payroll, less inventory, and less theft, while consumers get unobstructed convenience in their shopping experiences.

And, while the first examples we’re seeing are on a small, convenience-type level, in-person transactions of all sorts will shift accordingly—creating the need for micro-warehouses (think Ikea) that can serve both front and back-end operations.

Don’t expect all these details to bleed into every consumer experience shortly, but this year will mark a pivotal wave of progress for each of these areas.

Online Fashion Spotlight: SilkFred.com

We‘ve all been there; ready to attend an event but with nothing to wear. Last-minute shopping (both online and instore) commences, and you’re desperate to find the perfect dress to help you feel confident as you dance the night away.

If you find yourself in that all too familiar position, SilkFred is here to help. With a wide range of unique products to suit any style, Silkfred.com is the personal stylist you never knew you needed. Whether you are shopping for a date night or you are looking for a piece of knitwear to complement your winter wardrobe, they likely have an option for you.

With over 600 independent brands represented on the site, it is the perfect location for the fashion forward on the hunt for the next big thing. Grown completely from scratch through social media and the power of conversation, this innovative team have taken personal style and the latest trends to created a truly unique space for those that love all things fashion.

Whether you are looking for a modern twist on the classic little black dress or you want a maxi dress that makes a statement, you are spoilt for choice. With up and coming brands such as Lilah Rose and AX Paris, you can be sure that you are getting the very best of high-quality fashion at a price that won’t break the bank.

What If You Are New To Fashion?

If you are new to fashion then there is no need to worry; SilkFred does all the work for you.

The categories around the site are easy to find, all clearly laid out in a simple navigation bar. You can shop by the clothing item that you want and the style within each of these, as well as picking a ‘perfect for’ category if you need a bit of inspiration for an upcoming event. You can enjoy a seamless shopping experience without having to scroll through pages to find what you’re looking for, allowing you to get that all important outfit in no time at all.

What About Budget?

If you are looking for your next amazing dress but do not have a big budget, you can still find what you need at SilkFred. Within their website, you can look for all the latest bargains in their outlet and there are also regular sales where you grab a style steal. With select dresses selling out in some sizes, they offer you the chance to get outstanding deals on the last few remaining.

With Silkfred as your secret weapon, you can be sure to avoid a fashion faux pas at every event regardless of the dress code, allowing you to enjoy the very best in fashion all year round.

Safety Score

Autoliv, Inc. (NYSE: ALV and SSE: ALIVsdb), the worldwide leader in automotive safety systems, today introduced Safety Score by Autoliv, a smartphone application with the goal to make people of all ages become safer drivers.

Once downloaded and when active, Safety Score monitors real-time driver behaviors and compares it against Autoliv’s proprietary data algorithms and known causes of accidents and provides the user with a personalized 3-digit safe driver score. The higher the score the more safe-driving behaviors the driver exhibited over an array of data points including turning, acceleration, braking, speed and distractions. The app also collects and compares data on weather, type of roads driven on, time of day and trip duration.

“Today, nearly 1.4 million people die in traffic fatalities every year and that number is expected to increase,” said Cecilia Sunnevång, Ph.D., Autoliv Vice President of Research. “Autoliv has been collecting, studying and acting on accident data for 65 years and we believe the road to saving more lives includes improving driver behavior. Safety Score, when used regularly provides a unique understanding of an individual’s safe-driving patterns and provides a framework for coaching and improving safe-driving habits.”

Christoffer Malm, Autoliv Director of Digital and Mobility, added that having a personalized safety score based on individual driving behavior could also be used by ride-hailing, taxi, limousine and other fleet and professional driving companies to provide an objective picture of a user’s safe-driving habits and provide a platform for evaluating and improving driving behavior. Additionally, a personalized Safety Score based on individual driving behavior could also be used to reduce insurance costs.

“Many usage-based insurance programs collect vehicle data and score based on the performance of a vehicle, which often has multiple drivers, so driving behavior reported back to the insurance company isn’t personalized,” he said. “Safety Score assesses individual driving behavior – regardless of the vehicle driven – and provides a personalized score that could be used to determine an individual’s safe-driving behavior. The individual could then share this information with the insurance company to reduce costs.”

Learn more

www.sparepartstore24.co.uk

Local Hive Honey

Local Hive™ From Rice’s Honey® Recipes

Raw & Unfiltered Honey

Honey Made Right in Your Own Back Yard!

Local Hive™ from Rice’s Honey®, a leading producer of high quality, U.S. only raw & unfiltered honey since 1924, offers 16 different local varietals of raw honey including Local New England, Local Northeast, Local Florida, Authentic Clover & Authentic Wildflower. Whether it’s for a comforting hot drink during the cold days of winter or to enjoy recipes, the taste of real honey from Local Hive™ will help you create fond memories.

All Local Hive™ honeys are sourced exclusively in the U.S. and bottled in Greeley, Colorado. The team atLocal Hive™ work directly with local beekeepers across the U.S., to ensure each varietal yields incredibly delicious and subtly different natural flavors that will be great additions to your family recipes and holiday memories. https://localhivehoney.com/

Raw, unfiltered honey also offers many health benefits including being rich in antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, enzymes and pollen and it is kosher. Unlike processed unnatural sugars or sweeteners, Local Hive™ honey offers transparency, as each natural varietal is made so local it’s “made right in your own back yard”.

Very similar to wine, where you taste and see the difference between varietals, Local Hive™ from Rice’s Honey® also imparts specific flavors in each of the honeys they produce. From Washington to Florida each varietal is unique.

Local Hive New England Honey

Floral Sources: Basswood, Berries, Clover, Goldenrod

*Flavor is bold and robust. Northeast honeys are much darker than anywhere else.

Local Hive Florida Honey

Floral Sources: Citrus, Brazilian Pepper, Clover, Gallberry, Tupelo

*Flavor is a bit fruity with a hint of spice.

Local Hive Colorado Honey

Floral Sources: Clover, Alfalfa, Wildflowers

*Flavor should be light & sweet. The sweetest of all honeys sent.

Local Hive Southern California Honey

Floral Sources: Alfalfa, Berries, Citrus, Clover, Sage

*Flavor is fruity and sweet. You’ll notice a hint of orange

Local Hive Texas Honey

Floral Sources: Alfalfa, Clover, Cotton, Horsemint, Tallow

*Flavor is medium bodied and sweet. Not as sweet as Colorado.

“Delicious Local Hive™ honey is perfect for all ages,” noted Tony Landretti, Chief Executive Officer ofRice’s Honey®. “With different floral sources based on the location in which the bees pollinate, everyLocal Hive™ varietal offers a unique flavor. Since Rice’s Honey® was founded in 1924 by L.R. Rice, we have always remained committed to providing natural, delicious U.S. only raw & unfiltered honey, while supporting local beekeepers all across the U.S. Our local honey products are an artisan blend of various floral types that are regionally sourced, packed in Greeley, Colorado, and delivered to participating grocery stores throughout the United States.”

A new label design highlighting our new Local Hive™ brand coincides with Rice’s new alliance with PACE, “Pollinator Awareness Through Conservation and Education”, the Butterfly Pavilion’s non-profit global initiative to restore habitats, strengthen populations and reintroduce pollinators into native habitats around the world. This partnership and commitment will be communicated on the back of the new label and will highlight how a portion of proceeds from every bottle sold of Rice’s Honey® will be donated to the PACE initiative to promote and protect the prosperity of pollinators worldwide. Rice’s Honey® has a mission to help promote all pollinators & sustainable bee farms across the country.

Check out our new website at: www.localhivehoney.com for more information and recipes.

About Local Hive™ from Rice’s Honey®:

L.R. Rice founded Rice’s Honey®, headquartered in Greeley, Colorado, in 1924. The company remainbs committed to its founder’s mission of becoming a leading producer of authentic, high quality, U.S. only raw & unfiltered honey. Local Hive™ from Rice’s Honey® has generated brand equity through its commitment of producing premium, high quality, raw and unfiltered and kosher honey at affordable prices. Rice’s Honey works with local beekeepers to provide several local, raw & unfiltered honey varieties throughout various states and regions across the U.S.