Posts tagged with "race"

Morro Bay Bike Ride

Public Invited to Ride across Amgen Tour of California Stage 4 Finish at the Morro Bay Bike Ride Pre-Event and Party at the Pro Cyclists Meet & Greet

Cycle through the Stage 4 Finish Line on Race Day, Meet Former Professional

American Cyclist and Author Bob Roll and other Pro Cyclists at The Siren, Volunteer and Watch the Race Front and Center, Book Race Day VIP Lodging Packages or Hotels along the Race Route

The public is invited to participate in Amgen Tour of California Stage 4 race day fun in #cyclingmecca Morro Bay. The 2019 Amgen Tour of California announced Morro Bay will host the Stage 4 Finish of the men’s race on May 15, 2019 following the scenic route the Amgen Tour took in 2017, when Peter Sagan won the sprint finish. After passing through picturesque Morro Bay State Park, where riders get their first glimpse of iconic Morro Rock, Morro Bay’s busting waterfront before sprinting uphill into downtown Morro Bay for the big finish.

“Of all sports, it is cycling that has the most beautiful stadium and this ocean front Stage 4 Finish in Morro Bay is a stunner,” according to Bob Roll, former professional American cyclist and author. “With perfect year round riding weather, the world will get its chance to experience what the locals have enjoyed for years: varied terrain, wide open roads, first class dining and drop dead views. Can’t wait to be there!”

Morro Bay Bike Ride Pre-Event: Ride Across the Amgen Stage 4 Finish Line

Join event producer RaceSLO on race day for the Morro Bay Bike Ride May 15, 2019 from 1:30 to 2:30 pm. This ride ends with a sprint through the Amgen Tour of California Stage 4 Finish line on Harbor Street! All levels are welcome to this celebratory cycle pep rally with three participation options: kid-friendly, recreational rider or seasoned cyclist. Enjoy vendors, food and beverages as the crowd awaits the professional racers to start crossing the finish around 3:40 pm. Participants receive a collectible event t-shirt and free bike valet. Ride proceeds go to local non-profit partner Bike SLO County.

Pro Cyclists Meet & Greet at Siren Rhythm & Booze

Stick around after the race and head to the FREE Bob Roll Pro Cyclists Meet & Greet Event at The Siren May 15, 2019 at 5:30 pm, produced by RaceSLO. Get some cool cycling swag and raise some cold craft pints while helping raise funds for Bike SLO County during a LIVE Auction. Enjoy live music and catch a glimpse of Amgen competitors up close and personal. The event is over 21 only and FREE, but seating is limited so you must pre-register and present a ticket at the door.

Volunteer at Amgen Tour of California Stage 4 Finish

Amgen Tour of California is a Tour de France-style cycling road race created and presented by AEG that challenges the world’s top professional cycling teams to compete along a demanding course that traverses hundreds of miles of California’s iconic highways, byways and coastlines each spring. Tour officials say the 2019 race will be the longest and most challenging in its 14-year history. Many volunteers are needed to make this event a success. You don’t have to live in Morro Bay to participate. Click here to sign up and see the race up close!

Book Lodging Along the Race Route or Amgen Tour of California VIP Packages

Book your stay at a hotel along the Amgen Tour of California route to get a front row seat as the riders pass by. Or, book a suite or waterfront room in one of the participating Morro Bay hotels and receive exclusive access into the Amgen Tour of California VIP tent filled with perks and goodies! Hospitality Passes provide exclusive access into the main VIP Hospitality Tent located adjacent to the FINISH Line. VIP Hospitality Includes:

  • Swag bag of goodies that you’ll receive upon check-in
  • Premium Viewing Location right at the finish line
  • Gourmet foods catered from local restaurants throughout the area
  • Open Bar (includes beer and wine)
  • Lounge Style Seating with closed-circuit tv viewing
  • Live Race Coverage (last two hours of the broadcast)

For additional information on hotels in Morro Bay check out our booking engine here. Recently named one of the Best Small Towns in CA by Country Living Magazine, Morro Bay offers year round mild weather, perfect for epic outdoor adventure all year long. For more information on visiting Morro Bay, go to www.morrobay.org. #multisportmecca

About Morro Bay

A true #outdoormecca, this active seaside fishing village with bustling waterfront offers a picture-perfect getaway for travelers who seek food, wine and outdoor adventures found in nature. Located along coastal Highway 1 in San Luis Obispo County just south of Big Sur, midway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, Morro Bay offers year-round activities in an unspoiled slice of California. From ocean-side golf, kayaking, sailing, hiking, fishing, surfing, biking, and bird watching, to kite flying, shopping, dining, wine bars, local craft brews and miles of unspoiled beaches, there is something for everyone.

Sitting majestically between the beach and the harbor lays the iconic and historic landmark Morro Rock, welcoming travelers from miles away as they approach Morro Bay. Located just minutes from world-renowned Hearst Castle, historic missions, breathtaking Montana de Oro State Park, and surrounded by vineyards from Paso Robles to Edna Valley, Morro Bay is a destination designed to fit any style and budget for families, couples or groups. Morro Bay also offers a myriad of year-round events including food, wine and music festivals, art fairs and car shows unique to the town. For more travel information visit www.morrobay.org or follow Morro Bay on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Pinterest.

St. Maarten Heineken Regatta

Grand Opening of Regatta Village marks start of the countdown to 39th St. Maarten Heineken Regatta

Boats are arriving, teams gathering, serious sailing and race tactics discussed and evening plans for serious fun prepared as the countdown to the start of the 39th St. Maarten Heineken Regatta continues with the Grand Opening of the Regatta Village.

Organisers, volunteers, local residents and competitors gathered to witness Race Director Paul Miller formally launch this year’s event, slicing the cork off a bottle of champagne in flamboyant style.  Robbie Ferron, one of the founders of the Regatta and a former Commodore of St. Maarten Yacht Club said this year’s event “welcomed in a new era.” He was joined by another former Commodore, Ian Hope Ross, who said, “This year is a highlight for next year’s 40th, and we welcome old friends and new.”

A key event on the Caribbean race schedule, the regatta attracts some of the world’s elite sailors and crews, with fast and furious racing in monohulls, maxis and multihulls with six races held over four days.  For those looking for a more relaxed experience, the “Island Time Class” designed for cruisers, offers one race a day, ensuring all the fun of the regatta, without the stress!

Part of the attraction of this regatta is in its variety, both in size of boat, origin and aspirations.  Some of the world’s most elite performance race boats, such as Polish-entered Varsovie, a Swan 100S will be racing head to head against Umiko.  This stunning Nautor Swan Frers 80 is skippered by yacht broker Bill Titus with a crew that collectively have raced in 150 St. Maarten Heineken Regattas, but this is the first time on Umiko.   Bill comments, “I first raced in St. Maarten in 1993. The balance of serious sailing, warm waters and lifestyle draws me back and it is great to see the regatta still appealing to professional and amateur sailors from across the world. It’s about having fun together as a team out on the water in a beautiful yacht.”  

Some of the tightest and most competitive racing, says Race Director Paul Miller, will be in the CSA 3 (Performance 40) group with 11 entries; meanwhile the five boats from Poland, including Sailing Poland, the Volvo Ocean 65 formerly known as MAPFRE, will be head to head against I love Poland, a Volvo Open 70.  Both these boats demonstrate Poland’s commitment to developing young and promising sailors from Olympic classes into a regular professional Sailing Poland Race Team. “To acquire this boat [Sailing Poland] was a step forward in our mission to become one of the largest sailing organisations in Poland,” said Piotr Zygo, Sailing Poland’s CEO.   

At the other end of the scale, the St Maarten Heineken Regatta attracts families and cruising sailors, some of whom are en route to other destinations.  Dobro Dani, an Elan 434 owned by Jason and Roberta Bowman, are exactly halfway in their journey from Croatia to Vancouver. “We are really looking forward to the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta, and excited to be racing our boat in the Caribbean,” said Jason.  “We’re looking forward to tradewind round the can sailing and have heard rave reviews of the nightly parties and entertainment.”

On shore, the legendary parties at the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta continue to excel this year with festivities continuing long into the night.   The Grand Opening saw live music from Remo and the Barbwire Band, with acts during the week including “Queen of Soca” Alison Hinds, Shermanology, Fatman Scoop with the highlight at the final night being The Jacksons, live on stage.

As skipper Trevor Middleton from UK-based Sun Fast 3600 Black Sheep said, “We have never done the regatta before, but the reputation precedes it.  It sounds like a good mix of sailing, drinking and parties, what is not to like about that?”

Find out more about the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta, St. Maarten and island life here.

Tickets for the regatta parties can be purchased from the St. Maarten Yacht Club.

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About St Maarten Heineken Regatta

Now in its 39th year, the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta is four days of world-class racing starting on 28th February until the 3rd March 2019. Set in the crystal-clear waters of the Caribbean, sailing is powered by the cooling northeast trade winds and run by an experienced and friendly race team.

To find out more about the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta, please visit here.

 

Is Happy Marriage Possible With Mail Order Bride?

Today, dating and marriage take so many different forms, that every single person can find or even invent their own format of dating, wedding and family life. The cultures merge, people accept a new approach to relationships, and few can today be surprised with an unusual marriage. Globalization, on the other hand, removes the barriers between cultures and also removes distances between people of different cultures. As a result, a lot of couples meet online and build strong relationships, despite the fact of being the representatives of different nationalities, cultures, races or ethnicities.

The other side of it is that if the person cannot find a match for themselves in their area, lacks social circle or lives in a small town where all younger people try to move away, instead of being desperate about finding a couple, such person just goes online. So, people who are unhappy in relationships with their fellow citizens, just find a person, maybe of a totally different culture, who suits them just fine. Therefore, today dating mail order brides and creating families with them is a totally legal, acceptable and promising endeavor.

One has generally equal chances to create a happy family with a girl next door and a mail order bride. The only real difference is that with the girl next door, one may just lack other options. With the mail order bride, though, one can choose, and the girl herself is also ready to relationships, moving to a different country, and creating a family.

There are many benefits of mail order brides. Firstly, these are women who are truly ready to build relationships. If she has registered on the website, she understands the risks and responsibilities. Secondly, the majority of mail order brides are women from poorer countries, while the majority of their men are from richer countries. As a result, the girls are usually grateful for the possibility to move, and thus they are not that demanding in terms of courtship, presents, and similar stuff. After creating a family, they tend to take care of husband and children, instead of building a career or pursuing hobbies.

In the period of dating such girls, there are some possible difficulties like getting in touch on a regular basis, talking through an interpreter, organizing all those trips to each other, etc. For some men, this part is pretty tiresome, especially the legal aspect. However, as soon as everything is done, and the girl got married in her husband’s country, chances are high she becomes the most tender and attentive wife.

This is mostly caused by the fact that the man and the woman actually chose each other, considered all pros and cons about each other, discussed not movies and books, but their relationships and potential life together. They had the chance to know everything about each other and make an informed choice. So, such a marriage has more opportunities to be a happy and successful one.

The Northwoods of Wisconsin: An Outdoorsman’s Paradise

By Jake Porter & Vaughn Lowery

There is no better place in the United States to experience as many snow and cold-weather activities in one day as there is in the Northwoods region of Wisconsin. The two larger towns, Cable and Hayward, which are located in the far north of the state, act as home bases for tourists to Wisconsin. Hayward is a small, quaint town in Sawyer County, Wisconsin. It is characterized by its gently rolling hills, while Cable is just 15 minutes away. Aside from being known for it emphasis on outdoor activities, Cable is also renowned for being the starting point of the American Birkebeiner cross-country skiing race. There are also nationally renowned restaurants within a short 30 minute drive. Both locations offer an opportunity to escape from the stress of congested metropolitan cities and relax in the welcoming environment that both towns offer.

Traveling from the west coast, the north of Wisconsin is a dramatic change of pace from the bustling vibes of the many developed metropolitan cities. It is also the top destination for most snow-related adventure spots. The food and travel businesses in the area, the top two largest economies in the northern Wisconsin, are thriving and are welcoming to new small-businesses. With a well-developed and diverse school system in the surrounding communities, both towns are extremely capable of hosting both tourists and accommodating people intending to move to the region.

With their proximity to the great woods of the Chequamegan National Forest and the sparkling waters of Lake Owen and Namakagon, the recreational activities are abundant. Activities range from cross-country skiing, snowmobiling, snowshoeing, ice fishing, and winter fat biking. Cable is an epicenter for skiers, offering wonderfully groomed trails traversing the relatively flat landscape. At the start of the Birkebeiner trail in Cable, there is a newly built rest area and event center which offers a wide range of amenities including a source of heat in the wintertime. Snowmobiling is a crucial activity for the adventure-seeking traveler. It is also a staple for most of the locals in the area. In addition, ice fishing is a classic wintertime sport and can be done on most frozen lakes in the area. Fat Bike riding and snowshoeing can be done by most any able-bodied traveler. Bikes and snowshoes can be picked up at Howl Adventure Center, while snowmobiles can be rented from Hayward Power Sports.

As for the less adventurous travelers, downtown Hayward, which was named one of five Hallmark-worthy small towns in Wisconsin, is easy to explore. The downtown includes small boutiques and coffee/pastry shops which line the beautiful, quiet streets. Meet the artists at local art shops such as Art Beat and Nordic Northwoods, who specialize in fun, artsy gifts and souvenirs. Hayward Mercantile is a delightful place as well, filled with Wisconsin-made goods, while Ronnings, just a few doors down provides everything from moccasins to sweatshirts. Just 10 minutes away, Glassy Ladies Art Studio provides a fun environment to get your creative juices flowing while you learn glass fusing, bead making, metal-smithing, and how to work with stained glass.

After a long day in the snow, there is nothing better than a hot meal at lunch or at the end of the day. Lucky for you, there are countless, award winning, restaurants within close proximity. Tamarack Farms Winery is not only the number one winery in the area, but also provides small sandwiches and artisan pizza. The Old Southern Smokehouse, a creation of the award winning BBQ chef Dave Anderson, is the epitemy of a BBQ experience. Their menu consists of quality meats, fresh produce, and award winning sauces. The Landing, situated on the Chippewa Flowage is an amazing place known for its nationally renowned fish fry and its liquor bar. The owners, Chris and Elsie Lee are extraordinary people and are extremely hospitable. Located in Cable, The Brick House Cafe is a quaint place featured on Food Network’s Diners, Drive-in, and Dives with Guy Fieri. Serving sandwiches and fresh salads, they are known for their locally sourced meats and vegetables. It even occupies one of the oldest buildings in Cable, dating back to the 1800s!

Finally, The Rookery exhibits casual gourmet dining at its finest. The Rookery’s ever-changing menu features fresh fish specials and their famous bison steak. Here you will find some of the best vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options you’ll find anywhere in the northern Wisconsin communities. And what’s Wisconsin without cheese? Most of the restaurants and dives nestled in the towns serve a wide range of cheeses and fried cheese curds which are almost like a staple in the state. With all of these amazing options for food in the area, your taste buds are in for a real treat!

Not only is there a multitude of thrilling activities interspersed amongst the trails, forest, and lakes surrounding the area, there are also countless establishments in which to shop and also create art. Both communities are extremely sustainable, and are excitedly welcoming tourists and thrill-seekers alike. The spirit of the towns are quite endearing. The eager traveler definitely has a chance to fully experience what the area has to offer in a 5 day to a week span. Can you imagine visiting a region for the first time and immediately feeling at home and being welcomed by the locals? Can you imagine having access to incredible activities and nationally recognized eateries? Then the sister towns of Cable and Hayward should be at the top of your list of future travels. They are communities that are welcoming and make you feel at home, no matter your background, ethnicity, or culture.

Hayward Wisconsin, Wisconsin,  360 magazine

Restaurants and Eateries:

http://tamarackfarmswinery.com/

https://www.oldsouthernbbq.com/

http://www.thelcolanding.com/

https://thebrickhousecafe.net/

https://www.rookerypub.com/

Shopping and Art:

http://www.artbeatofhayward.com/

https://nordicnorthwoods.com/

http://haywardmercantileco.com/

https://ronningsofhaywardinc.business.site/

https://www.travelwisconsin.com/arts-and-culture/glassy-ladies-art-emporium-281937

Adventure Sports Rentals:

http://www.howlinbayfield.com/bike.html

https://www.haywardpowersports.com/

A Voice for the Forgotten Minority

If foundations fall short on equality for people with disabilities, Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi puts them on the spot.
By Alex Daniels

A microphone in Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi’s hands is a powerful weapon. At venues across the country, Mizrahi has used her strong, clear voice to ask foundation leaders variations of one simple question: Why aren’t people with disabilities included?

As large foundations have placed more muscle behind programs that promote equity in terms of race, wealth, gender identity, and sexual orientation, Mizrahi believes people with disabilities have been overlooked.

During question-and-answer sessions at major foundation gatherings, she is the first with her hand up, ready to put foundation leaders on the spot. Why isn’t a foundation’s website accessible to the blind? she’ll ask. Or why isn’t data on disabled voters included on a conference speaker’s chart of voting patterns among residents of rural areas, African-Americans, and young people?

The reason for the neglect, she says, is that disability groups have too often come to foundations looking for charity. That strategy is rooted in the idea that donors should take pity on people who are blind, have dwarfism, or are intellectually challenged, she says, rather than treating discrimination against them as a violation of their civil rights.

“The overall messages of the disability community caused us more harm than good,” she says. “The more they were repeated, the more harm was done.”

Through RespectAbility, an organization she co-founded five years ago, and through her own philanthropy, Mizrahi has pushed to eliminate stigmatization and to reduce barriers to employment for people with disabilities.

Sometimes her approach is direct, such as when she called Darren Walker, president of the Ford Foundation, a “hypocrite” in an email for not including disabilities in the grant maker’s shift to focus entirely on equity. After that, and with the input of lots of others in addition to Mizrahi, Walker issued a mea culpa and announced that Ford would work to address inequalities based on disability throughout all of its programs. Mizrahi now calls Ford’s response the “gold standard.”

Donn Weinberg, executive vice president of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation and co-founder of RespectAbility, said Mizrahi is “fearless” in asking difficult questions of foundation honchos. When she’s able to get face-to-face with philanthropy executives at conferences, she seizes the opportunity to educate them about disability issues.

Private Consultations

Some nonprofit leaders grumble privately that Mizrahi sometimes claims credit for efforts that were already underway. And sometimes her questions come in the form of short lectures.

At a Philanthropy Roundtable conference in 2017, the group’s staff asked Weinberg, who also serves as Philanthropy Roundtable’s chairman, if he could persuade Mizrahi to tone down her rhetoric and get to the point. “She clearly wants people to hear a bit of commentary before the question,” he says. “She’s planting seeds of thought and bringing to people’s consciousness an issue they often don’t think about.”

But Mizrahi doesn’t see herself as a provocateur or a grandstander. She consults directly with nonprofit leaders to make sure their websites, grant applications, and program strategies benefit and are accessible to people with disabilities.

She’s created a set of guidelines and tools for organizations that want to gauge whether they are being inclusive. And she dispatches young professionals and students working as RespectAbility fellows to interview foundation employees about how they communicate with, employ, and benefit the disabled population.

“We try to call people aside and not call them out,” she insists, saying most of her work is done in private consultations with foundation leaders, not in the public spotlight. “I like to see myself as a partner, a facilitator, and a resource.”

Aaron Dorfman knows from experience.

Mizrahi said her annual-dues statement from Dorfman’s group, the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy, sold the organization as a social-justice champion — but something was missing.

“They were very proud to send me a 12-page, single-spaced memo on diversity, equity, and inclusion,” she says. “The word ‘disability’ wasn’t in it.”

The two met for coffee to discuss the matter. Afterward, as the committee was preparing to release a guide for foundations interested in social justice, Dorfman asked Mizrahi to analyze a draft to make sure it adequately covered disability.

Dorfman said he welcomed the challenge. By putting foundation leaders on the spot at conferences, Mizrahi is helping philanthropy see its shortcomings and grow.

“There’s a certain amount of discomfort when you get called out, even if you get called out rightfully,” he says. “This culture of politeness doesn’t serve marginalized communities well. It’s all right to make someone feel uncomfortable in pursuit of full inclusion.”

Diversity Includes Disabled People

Some foundations recognize they need help. A survey of 205 foundation chief executives conducted by the Center for Effective Philanthropy found that most leaders thought their organization was staffed by people with a diversity of backgrounds and served a diverse set of beneficiaries in terms of race, gender, and sexual orientation. But over half said they fell short when it came to people with a disability.

The reason, according to Judy Belk, president of the California Wellness Foundation, is many people think the Americans With Disabilities Act, passed in 1990, cured injustices faced by disabled people.

The existence of handicapped parking places and curb cuts on street corners, Belk says, doesn’t mean all of the challenges have been addressed. Similarly, just because philanthropies have crafted strategies designed to ameliorate inequities doesn’t mean they’ve faithfully put them into practice.

For Belk, concentrating on disabilities could be a good way to achieve progress in some of the foundation’s existing programs, including efforts to improve oral health for low-income adults, prevent HIV/AIDS among women of color, and help women of color adjust to society after being incarcerated. All of the groups that stand to benefit from that work, Belk says, include a large proportion of people with disabilities.

To start, the California Wellness Foundation had RespectAbility audit its website. Mizrahi’s staff found that the grant maker’s web presence wasn’t an inviting place for everyone. Belk ordered a redo to make sure the site complied with content-accessibility guidelines.

“Foundations have diversity, equity, and inclusion statements up the wazoo,” she says. “They can show you a statement and say they’re committed. I’d like to push ourselves and hold ourselves accountable.”

Easy Improvements

Foundations have largely failed to incorporate disability into the programs they run and the data they collect, Mizrahi says. And she thinks nonprofits in general have fallen behind businesses and government agencies in accommodating people with disabilities. Though many organizations would like to make progress, they often fear it will cost a lot.

Many fixes aren’t expensive but require presence of mind. For instance, Mizrahi says, it’s free and easy to make Twitter and Facebook feeds accessible and put captions on YouTube videos. And avoiding meetings in places like church basements that aren’t accessible for people in wheelchairs requires the presence of mind to schedule gatherings elsewhere.

Mizrahi says she’d rather educate than scold, and help people understand that people with disabilities are productive team members.

“I don’t view every organization equally,” she said. “The Americans With Disabilities Act treats organizations differently based on size and budget, and so do I. If it’s a small, fragile organization with nobody on staff, I have very few expectations they’ll all of a sudden have a personal-care assistant for someone who is a quadriplegic and on oxygen in order to participate in their program.”

Nonprofits lack clear guidelines on the steps they should take to make their organizations more accessible, according to Michael Thatcher, president of Charity Navigator. Over the past year, he has been in discussions with Mizrahi about how to encourage charities to get started.

Master Problem-Solvers

The first step, Mizrahi says, is to help organizations understand what kind of contributions people with disabilities can make.

At a Capitol Hill conference that RespectAbility held in July, Vincenzo Piscopo, the director of community and stakeholder relations for the Coca-Cola Company, told the 200 attendees that people with disabilities are often accustomed to overcoming obstacles and are master problem- solvers. It’s incumbent on people with disabilities in the work force to serve as ambassadors, to help employers understand what they bring to the table.

“When companies have people with disabilities, they’re providing value to their company,” he told the gathered crowd. “They’re not doing charity.”

Stephanie Farfan is one of those ambassadors. Farfan, a little person who calls herself a “master Googler,” was looking for internships specially geared toward disability issues and found RespectAbility online. There weren’t a lot of other opportunities like it.

RespectAbility’s fellows program, which is supported by the Stanford and Joan Alexander and Ford foundations, allows students and young professionals to work in public policy and communications roles and in the organization’s foundation practice.

Before she came to Washington to attend graduate school in international studies at American University, Farfan worked in Florida with Little People of America. A fluent Spanish speaker, her volunteer work with Little People of America often involved talking with Hispanic parents of children with dwarfism.

Coming to RespectAbility, Farfan, who wants to pursue a career at the State Department, has spent much of her time delving into state laws and regulations on disability issues.

“Coming over to the policy side has given me a new perspective,” she says. “It’s rounded out my skill set.”

‘One Toe in the Water’

Mizrahi’s behind-the-scenes work has resulted in changes in foundation practices. In addition to the National Committee on Responsive Philanthropy and the Belk Foundation, she shared — on the condition that they not be named — emails from several grant makers showing they had incorporated RespectAbility’s suggestions into their website design and broader communication strategy.

While she’d like to keep those successes private, she’s not afraid of publicly criticizing foundations she thinks are lagging behind.

She slammed the Lumina Foundation for not specifically incorporating people with disabilities in its work-force development grants. She said the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation provided little money to directly support disabilities and did not collect or disseminate data on the progress of students with disabilities in its domestic education work.

“I am deeply disturbed that Lumina and Gates aren’t doing dramatically more,” she says. “They are both sort of one toe in the water.”

In response, Lumina’s director of strategic communications, Kevin Corcoran, said that while there is “laudable” work being done to ensure people with disabilities succeed after high school, the foundation’s focus was on educational outcomes for students of color. The Gates Foundation said it has been making changes to address the issue, but it did not single out any one person who pushed for the revisions.

In October 2017, Gates “refreshed” its approach to education grant making. Since then, the foundation has said it has begun to disaggregate the data it collects so it can track students with disabilities, and it has begun to support programs to accommodate disabled charter-school students.

“We have already begun to fund research to help us understand how the foundation could best support success, engagement, and transitions for students with disabilities, and we plan to make the results of this research publicly available, via our grantees,” the foundation said in a statement.

An Advantage From Dyslexia

Activists have pushed foundations to recognize disabilities in the broader civil-rights context for decades. In the 1980s, Donors Forum, a collective of Illinois grant makers now known as Forefront, had a board meeting to discuss a survey on diversity it was going to send out to members.

Marca Bristo, who was a board member at the time, said there were no questions about disabilities. “They just plain forgot about it,” says Bristo, who is president of Access Living, a Chicago disability and housing advocate.

More recently, Bristo has noticed a desire among large foundations to learn more. Before the MacArthur Foundation awarded $100 million to Sesame Street Workshop and the International Rescue Committee last year as part of its 100&Change challenge, Bristo sat down with the foundation’s president Julia Stasch to figure out how to incorporate inclusion of people with disabilities into the award.

With Susan Sygall, a former MacArthur fellow and CEO of Mobility International, Bristo reviewed the contest’s eight semifinalists and developed a disability checklist that the applicants could use to assess their pitches.

“Leaders from the disability-rights movement have been working on these issues for years,” she wrote in an email to the Chronicle. “The work RespectAbility has focused on is critically important but not new. No one organization can do this transformational work alone. The intransigence of stigma, prejudice, and exclusion requires a sustained and collaborative effort by all of us.”

Before the winners were named, Mizrahi was instrumental in “amplifying” the work to include people with disabilities, according to Cecilia Conrad, who leads MacArthur’s 100&Change program. Mizrahi consulted with the foundation about what constitutes full inclusion and wrote opinion pieces that highlighted the role of inclusion in the award.

For Mizrahi, becoming an effective communicator didn’t come naturally. As someone with dyslexia, she didn’t begin reading until she was 12 and didn’t achieve functional literacy until two years later. After an early growth spurt, she reached her full, above average, adult height at a very early age. She seemed all grown up, but she was having a difficult time. Adults around her expressed their disappointment in her academic progress, calling her “lazy.”

Mizrahi responded to the challenge through intensive work on reading. She expertly honed her listening and speaking skills. Now, she says, when she enters any conversation or debate, her disability has given her a huge advantage.

“Having a disability means there’s something you can’t do in your everyday living. But there’s nothing in the world that says you can’t be the best in the world at something else.”

2019 Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon

Former champions Lemi Berhanu and Worknesh Degefa will be among the powerful elite line-up when the Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon celebrates its 20th edition on the streets of the UAE on January 25.

The two Ethiopians – winners in 2015 and 2017 respectively – are key figures in the roll of honour of the Middle East’s biggest mass participation event, the only IAAF Gold Label Marathon in the region.

Lemi has performed well on the global stage but his best performances have always been on the flat and fast streets of Dubai. As well as winning the title four years ago in a time of 2h:05m:28s, he set his personal best at the event when as defending champion he finished runner-up in 2016 in 2h:04:33.

Still only 25, Lemi has also competed at World Championship level and at the Rio Olympics in 2016. Like an increasing number of elite runners, he has also prospered at the marathon distance in China, winning the Hengshui title with 2h:08m:51s in September 2018, the Xiamen Marathon in 2017 (2h:08m:27s) and the 2014 Taiyuan Marathon (2h:13m:10s).

Held under the patronage of HH Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai, and staged under the aegis of the Dubai Sports Council, the 2019 Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon will welcome a number of the world’s best athletes as the marathon celebrates its 20th anniversary with elite fields in both the men and women’s races.

Among the leading elite women in the line-up, Worknesh Degefa who stunned the athletics world in 2017 by winning on her marathon debut in Dubai. The Ethiopian caused quite an upset beating a strong field of experienced marathon runners in a time of 2h:22m:36s although she was disappointed 12 months later.

Running in the defence of her crown Worknesh set a new personal best 2h:19m:53s yet failed to break into the top three as the Standard Chartered Dubai Marathon once again proved its strength in depth with four women breaking the 2h:20m – the first time the feat has ever been achieved in one race.

“It’s very unusual that a runner will break the 2:20 mark and not win a marathon,” said Event Director Peter Connerton. “But that just shows how deep the quality runs in our elite fields. Last year we had seven men break 2h:05m – a unique result in marathon history – so the athletes competing in Dubai know they have to be at their very best to get among the medals.”

The elite marathon athletes will get their race underway at 6am on January 25, five minutes after the wheelchair athletes take to the course. The mass marathon field will face the starting gun at 7am with the 10km Road Race beginning at 8.30am and the 4km Fun Run at 10.30am. Runners looking to register can still do so by visiting the official website www.dubaimarathon.org.

In addition to Standard Chartered as title sponsor, the Dubai Marathon is supported by the Dubai Sports Council, adidas, Dubai Eye 103.8FM, Aquafina and Gatorade, Dubai Holding, Dubai Police, Dubai Municipality and the RTA.

Petersen Automotive Museum Opens New “Legends of Los Angeles” Exhibit

On November 10, 2018, the Petersen Automotive Museum opened its latest exhibit, “Legends of Los Angeles: Southern California Race Cars and Their Builders,” in the Charles Nearburg Family Gallery presented by Lucas Oil. The display features 12 Los Angeles-built race cars powered by engineering masterminds such as Ed “The Old Master” Pink and Fred Offenhauser and piloted by legends such as Don “The Snake” Prudhomme, Parnelli Jones, Bill Stroppe and Dan Gurney.

“Legends of LA” is highlighted by a stunning180-degree panoramic video, which surrounds the collection of race cars and provides an immersive way to experience the fastest race cars ever built in Los Angeles as they are raced on the region’s famed tracks. Featuring vehicles from every major racing type including midgets, sprint cars, dragsters, off-road cars, IndyCars, land-speed cars and road-racing cars, the panoramic video works alongside the display to take viewers on a visual journey down historic tracks such as El Mirage, Willow Springs International Raceway and Perris Auto Speedway.

Key vehicles on display include a 1963 Ol’Yaller Mark IX, which was one of the last race cars designed and built by Southern California hot rod legend Max Balchowsky; a 1964 Shelby Cobra 289 FIA, one of five FIA-spec factory team cars that competed in the 1964 World Championship and was raced by Dan Gurney in the Targa Florio; a 1967 Long 
“Shelby Super Snake” with an Ed Pink racing engine, which made history when driver Done Prudhomme accomplished four quarter-mile runs in the six-second range at the 1967 NHRA Spring Nationals; and Big Oly, a 1970 Ford Bronco which was raced to a back-to-back victories at the Baja 1000 in 1971 and 1972 by the legendary off-roading team of Parnelli Jones and Bill Stroppe.

“From the early years of auto racing to today, Los Angeles has played a key role in the development and growth of motorsports in North America,” said Executive Director Terry L. Karges. “Our new exhibit honors the region’s rich history through some of the finest examples of race car engineering and design, telling a comprehensive story about the legends that helped establish Los Angeles as the diverse racing destination that is today.”

Preceding the public opening, the Petersen hosted a formal cocktail reception and media preview on Thursday, November 8, 2018. The evening paid homage to LA-based racing icon and race car constructor Parnelli Jones, a motorsports legend known for his victories in nearly every major auto racing event in the United States. Jones, whose voice is featured in the gallery video was praised on stage while guests bid on his signed racing memorabilia during a silent auction.

“Legends of Los Angeles” will run through December 1, 2019. To learn more about the new exhibit or the Peterson Automotive Museum, please click here!

The Petersen Automotive Museum Foundation is a non-profit 501(c)(3) charity. The Museum is located at 6060 Wilshire Boulevard (at Fairfax) in Los Angeles, California, 90036. Admission prices are $16 for general admission adults, $13 for seniors and students with ID, $8 for children ages 3 to 12. Active military with ID, personal care attendants and children under three are admitted free. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For general information, call 323-930-CARS or visit here!

Pirelli 2019 Tire Range Presentation for Formula 1

Next year, there will be just three P Zero colors at each race. These will always be the same – white, yellow and red – denoting the hard, medium and soft tire choices respectively at every Grand Prix. But that doesn’t mean that there will be only three tire compounds.

Instead, the hard, medium and soft tire compounds will continue to vary to suit the different characteristics of each track. For instance, a Red soft tire for Monaco will differ substantially from a Red soft tire for Silverstone or Suzuka. The precise number of tire compounds available, covering a wide spectrum from soft to hard, will be communicated in December after homologation from the FIA. Before every race next year, Pirelli will reveal which exact tire compounds form the hard, medium and soft choices for the weekend. This new system makes it easy for the casual fan to tell the difference between the tires, yet still allows people who want more detail to know which of the specific tire compounds available are being used.

The colors for the Cinturato intermediate tire and full wet tires remain unchanged next year – green and blue respectively. Mario Isola, Pirelli’s Head of Car Racing – “We’ve been talking about this with the Teams, FIA and Formula 1 for a while. The idea behind the change is to make all the tires more easily recognizable and explainable – especially for television – while still clearly denoting which specific tire compounds are being used at each race”.

LA Fashion Week 2018

Fashion week continued in LA with a flood of trendy and edgy designs. Events were held at the Petersen Auto Museum located in Central LA. 360 Magazine had the opportunity to attend multiple days of the week, the second day fancying major highlight moments. LA Fashion Week showcased new lines from SAV NOIRPAKWAI and BOMME STUDIO. 360 sat down with founder and designer Bo Matthew Metz, from Bomme Studio, to discuss his background and influence for the new line. The Portage, Indiana native revealed that dreams like his his weren’t a thing growing up surrounded by steal workers. In the video below, Bo expresses his inspiration behind the new fashion and music from the walk.