Posts tagged with "press"

How Big Tech Is Destroying Our Press

Ahead of today’s House Judiciary Hearing, the Save Journalism Project held a press call with Rep. Mark DeSaulnier (CA-11); journalists Laura Bassett, laid off by HuffPost; and John Stanton, laid off by BuzzFeed; and Neil Chase, CEO of CalMatters and former executive editor of The Mercury News and East Bay Times.

The monopolistic power of big tech companies like Google, Facebook, and Apple is destroying the economic model of the entire journalism industry, whether its traditional circulation newspapers or digital news outlet.

 This week’s hearing on how digital platforms affect news organizations marks the much-needed return of congressional antitrust scrutiny to big tech companies, which have gained a monopolistic position that lets them dominate the digital advertising marketplace and distribute massive amounts of content from news publishers on their platforms without paying to produce the content. 

Rep. Mark DeSaulnier (CA-11) said, “I don’t think there’s anything more important right now than this issue. Being from the Bay Area, I have been to every big tech company. After meeting with them, I think it’s time to make it easier for licensing like the music and movie industries have done. We are members of Congress, you are journalists, and we have to keep an appropriate Constitutional distance, but there are policy proposals in our legislation that protect the freedom of the press and are necessary to keep the industry alive. When I was first elected to the Concord City Council there was a reporter who was consistently in the front row keeping officials accountable. His presence made local government work, and it is vital that we protect the journalism industry to make sure leaders are kept accountable and communities are informed.”

Laura Bassett, a reporter who was laid off by HuffPost, commented, “In the first few months of 2019, I was one of about 2,400 journalists and media staffers who lost our jobs. Even though I was aware the cuts were coming, it was still shocking to be laid off after nearly a decade in my newsroom. The reason for the mass layoffs, I found out, was that Big Tech companies like Google and Facebook are dominating the digital ad market, swallowing about 60 percent of all revenue and making it difficult for journalism to survive. News publishers are being forced to give a cut of their ad revenue to these companies- revenue that would otherwise go to hiring journalists. Because a well-funded news media is vital to a healthy democracy, the public needs to be aware of Big Tech’s death grip on publishers. At the House Judiciary Hearing today, lawmakers in Congress need to address this bipartisan issue and find legislative solutions that regulate tech giants and restore fairness to the digital ad market. Journalists are taught not to be the story, but as Big Tech’s digital ad monopoly benefits off of our revenue streams, it’s incumbent upon us to fight for the future of our industry. One or two companies should not have the power to cripple the free press.”

“After 20 years of covering Congress and the White House for BuzzFeed, I found out layoffs were coming in a tweet from the Wall Street Journal,” said John Stanton, former Buzzfeed Washington Bureau Chief before being laid off. “Despite the great work my colleagues and I were doing for the publication, there simply wasn’t enough money. Because stories that lead to changes in state and federal law, jailing of criminals and exposing wrongdoing — cost money. Money that is increasingly gobbled up by Google and Facebook. To try to survive, slashes had to be made. To entire desks. The reason advertising revenue has fallen so steeply is that Google and Facebook dominate the digital ad market, consuming more than 60 percent of all revenue. And their share is growing, because they devour nine out of every ten new dollars that are spent on digital advertising. Big Tech’s monopoly has a death grip on publishers. Congress needs to be discussing how to regulate this imbalance and restore competitive fairness in the digital market.”

Neil Chase, CEO of CalMatters and former executive editor of The Mercury News and East Bay Times, added, “We all believe journalism is central to democracy. Newspapers have experienced a decline not in the past five years, not in the past ten or fifteen years, but in the past seventy-five years. Newspapers have been declining since World War II. The problem is that we are essentially sitting on a 200 year-old product, but are trying to compete with new and changing technologies. Newspapers have maintained a monopoly for over 200 years. This is how people historically gained all their information; how they found where to buy clothing, where to buy their groceries, and where they got their news. With the change in how society works, all we have is the news. In order to solve this problem, we need a multi-pronged approach. We need to engage in philanthropy, which my company is already focused on this aspect. We need newspapers with benevolent leaders, not the leaders that we have at some major news organizations now. We need support from legislators. And, we need people paying for the news. We need a lot of support from a lot of different places in order to make this work.”

Save Journalism Project Launches To Protect Our Press From Big Tech

BuzzFeed Reports on Recently Laid Off Journalists Serving  As Spox For New Campaign To Save Journalism From Monopolistic Power of Big Tech Companies

Today, BuzzFeed reports on the Save Journalism Project that’s launching to raise awareness and engagement about the critical need to save journalism as it faces an existential threat—the monopolistic power of big tech companies like Google, Facebook, and Apple destroying the economic model of the entire journalism industry, whether its traditional circulation newspapers or digital news outlets. At the same time, Google and Facebook have made acquisition after acquisition, gaining a monopolistic position that lets them dominate the digital advertising marketplace and distribute massive amounts of content from news publishers on their platforms without paying to produce the content. Just now are Facebook, Google, and other tech giants facing federal government and Congressional antitrust scrutiny.

Two recently laid off reporters will serve as spokespeople for the Save Journalism Project, Laura Bassett  and John StantonLearn More and Join the Fight at SaveJournalism.org and@SaveTheNews.

BuzzFeed: These Reporters Lost Their Jobs. Now They’re Fighting Back Against Big Tech.

“John Stanton and Laura Bassett are warning about what they believe the tech industry is doing to journalism, as thousands have lost their jobs this year alone.

By Rosie Gray”

Two prominent reporters who were recently laid off from digital media outlets are forming a new advocacy group formed to raise awareness about big tech’s impact on the journalism industry.

John Stanton, a longtime congressional correspondent and former BuzzFeed News Washington bureau chief, and Laura Bassett, a former culture and political reporter for nearly 10 years at the Huffington Post, have teamed up to launch a new initiative called the Save Journalism Project. The two have first-hand experience with the troubled state of the news industry: Stanton was laid off from BuzzFeed News during a round of layoffs that affected 200 people company-wide this winter and spurred a unionization drive among the news staff. Bassett lost her job in similar fashion in January after Huffington Post laid off 20 employees as part of larger cuts at its parent company, Verizon Media.

This year has been one of the worst in recent memory for journalism jobs. Across the industry, thousands have lost their jobs: from BuzzFeed News, Vice, CNN, and others across the country at local publications. Media organizations have been imperiled by crashing advertising revenues as Facebook and Google vacuum up available ad dollars.

Their new project will be set up as a nonprofit, according to Eddie Vale, a Democratic consultant whose firm is providing the man-power to launch the effort. Vale pitched Bassett on the idea, and the two of them brought in Stanton. Vale said initial funding had been secured from “someone who doesn’t want to be public so Google and Facebook don’t go after them,” and the group plans to continue to fundraise. So far, the pair have co-authored testimony given to the Senate Judiciary Committee highlighting the tech giants’ impact on the news industry — “since being laid off, we’ve made it our mission to understand how the digital marketplace works and how Big Tech is killing the journalism industry,” they wrote — flown a plane above Google’s I/O conference, and authored op-eds.

A key part of their goal is to get journalists, who aren’t known for showing a keen interest in the business side of their publications or for engaging in advocacy themselves, to take an active role in defending the future of their jobs. In an interview, Stanton said they were “trying to educate the public and members of Congress and also start encouraging our colleagues to speak up.”

“Reporters are not generally super interested in speaking about their own problems and about things that affect them directly because they feel like it becomes a conflict of interest, and in certain ways that’s true,” Stanton said. “But when the future of the free press is being pretty seriously endangered by something, I think it’s incumbent upon us to stand up for ourselves.”

Like many reporters, Bassett said she had “never really had to pay attention to the financial side of journalism.”

But “after getting laid off, I started to become really interested in why all of these amazing news publishers were sort of going under, having to lay off staff, why we were losing local newspapers. It’s a tragedy, it’s really bad for democracy.”

Their effort comes at a time of increased scrutiny of the tech industry on the part of the federal government as well as Congress as public concern mounts over repeated privacy scandals, technology companies’ role in spreading misinformation, and their dominance over certain industries. The Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission reportedly made a deal to divide potential antitrust investigations between them; Apple and Google will fall under the purview of the DOJ, while the FTC took Facebook and Amazon. The House Judiciary Committee announced it would “conduct a top-to-bottom review of the market power held by giant tech platforms.”

The Save Journalism Project’s founders are hoping to steer the public conversation around the negative effects of Big Tech towards its impact on journalism.

Stanton, who lives in New Orleans, mentioned examples like that city’s local paper, the Times-Picayune, which laid off its entire staff last month. Around the country, Stanton said, “local reporters are so overtaxed. They’re doing as good a job as they can but there’s not enough of them.”

At the moment, Stanton and Bassett are more focused on warning the public and the industry about the issue than on proposing solutions.

“I do think that everyone is starting to see a need to break up and regulate these companies or something along those lines,” Bassett said. “And with regards to how they’re going to make journalism viable again, I don’t frankly know…I think right now we’re starting with just getting this conversation out into the public and making people aware of exactly what’s going on. I do hope at some point we graduate into saying, ‘here’s a list of policy proposals, here’s exactly what needs to happen.'”

Stanton and Bassett plan to interview elected officials, candidates and colleagues in the media about the industry’s crisis, and started with conducting on-camera interviews with Reps. Mark DeSaulnier and Ruben Gallego. They plan to circulate a letter with which media companies can sign on to their cause. And their first official event will be at the annual Congressional Baseball Game, where they plan to distribute a physical newspaper laying out the problems on their agenda.

“The DC press corps is a really powerful constituency within our industry,” Stanton said. “If we can get our colleagues [there] to start talking about this it will help more broadly.”

Kamala Harris, Here’s A Taste of Your Own Medicine

By M. Marie Brown

Another snake slithers out of the swamp. If you wanted an antidote to Mr. Trump, this creature is not it. Please, someone over the age of 35 with ethics, step up!

In the meantime, in the interest of determining fitness for the job and as you say, “the American public deserves to know the character of someone who will serve” in an important federal office. We will follow the lead of your heraldedblunt” style that includes proudly publically reeling off George Carlin’s Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television” with the favorite being mother*****.

Let the questions begin!

1. Are you aware of the perception in certain communities that you got ahead by having sex with a married man twice your age?

It was a wide open secret that you were corrupt San Francisco politician Willie Brown’s “new steady” despite the fact that state assembly “Speaker for Life,” the “Ayatollah of the Assembly” was married, 60 (to your 29 years). What kind of person comes out publicly as his date at his 60th birthday party, despite his wife of 36 years being in attendance? Do you believe having your paramour’s wife discuss your affair with her husband would “offer a clearer picture into who you really are”? “Listen, she [Harris] may have him at the moment, but come inauguration day and he’s up there on the platform being sworn in, I’ll be the b***h holding the Bible.”

Just for the record, Brown appointed Harris—a young deputy district attorney in Alameda County—to high-profile, lucrative patronage positions on the state’s Unemployment Insurance Appeals Board (at $97,088 annually for two meetings a month) and the California Medical Assistance Commission netting her more than $400,000 between 1994 and 1999. And a shiny new BMW!

2. Are you aware of the perception by many political observers that your narrow win in the race for California Attorney General was, shall we say, questionable? Despite registered Democrats outnumbering Republicans statewide by thirteen percent, Los Angeles District Attorney Steve Cooley (endorsed by the Sacramento Bee, the state capitol’s newspaper) led you by 34,000 votes after more than 7 million were counted. Some observers believe there is “reliable information” that you spoke with someone in Sacramento and magically enough provisional ballot votes for you to eke out at 0.2 percent win appeared? Wait. “I think you’re thinking of someone and you don’t want to tell us.” “Be sure about your answer, ma’am.”

3. Are you aware of the perception by some that you were either a poor manager of the San Francisco DA’s office or amazingly willfully ignorant? We can take the word of a judge’s 26-page ruling that found that while San Francisco DA you violated defendants’ rights by hiding damaging information about a police drug lab technician suspected of stealing portions of cocaine samples that later led the San Francisco police to shut down an entire section of the lab.

One wonders about your honesty when asked about your knowledge of a top aide of yours for 14 years made a $400,000 gender harassment settlement: “I did not.” “Nope.” You never answered whether you believe the accuser since you had “not talked to her directly.” Her name was not Christine Ford, thus not to be believed unconditionally.

4. In a “search for the truth” would it be beneficial to hear the testimony of former San Francisco DA and State Justice Department employees who are undoubtedly credible and honest because they have nothing to gain? These deputies attorney general don’t see you as particularly committed to the work of the office. You were rarely sighted in Sacramento, where much of the Department of Justice is located. You spent much of your time in Los Angeles and San Francisco running for higher office.

5. If you are “For the people”, why would consumer advocates say, “She has no presence.” “She has no involvement. She has no leadership. You have no sense of her being out there on the front saying we’re charging forward to do what’s right.” Or those who think you are soft on public corruption because it might cause “friction” with fellow Democratic politicians or that you avoided privacy issues for fear of losing Silicon Valley support.

6. Were you aware that some people have the perception that you are a partisan tyrant who does not follow the will of the people? Like when without explanation, you did not enforce a citizen initiative passed by 70 percent of voters barring paroled sex offenders from living within 2,000 feet of schools and parks. And by assigning “egregiously unfair” descriptions to voter-sponsored citizen-driven initiatives that cast them in a bad light when they run counter to certain Democratic special interests. Propositions from pension reform to limiting tax increases that the people will never see because the sponsors withdrew them after you deceptively entitled them. Or that you demanded that conservative-leaning nonprofits file with your office unredacted donor lists—confidential information typically submitted only to the Internal Revenue Service—exposing supporters of such groups to the risk of disclosure and retaliation. Remember, as the ACLU said, the first target is rarely the last.

7. Surely, being fearless, you wouldn’t avoid the press. We know giving a straight answer regarding sanctuary cities is tough: “To be honest with you, San Francisco’s policy has changed in the last few years; I haven’t looked at the details, so I can’t comment on it. On the infamous illegal immigrant killer of Kate Steinle: “My reluctance to answer these questions [about Kate Steinle’s infamous killer]…is that I don’t actually know what happened…you’re talking about important details…and I don’t have any knowledge about what actually occurred.”

8. Were you aware that some people in the blogosphere have this perception about you? No dignity. No self-respect. Just naked ambition. She is vulgar, unprofessional, deceitful, two-faced, ambitious to the extreme. I pray to God that I never stoop to this level to either: A.) keep a man or B.) get power/money.

It was good of you to leave the posh Los Angeles Brentwood neighborhood where the median price of a home is $3,136,500 and has a black population of 1.7 percent and pose as an Obama wannabe by giving your big speech your “birthplace” Oakland although most of your youth was spent in Canada.

So we have a potty-mouthed incompetent phony who learned tricks at the knee of a California politician who is famous for being corrupt. If she were a white male she would be vilified. Sadly, in today’s world of check the right identity politics box, her greatest attribute is that she is an ethnic female.

But to this ethnic female, she is a total disgrace – not what our young women should aspire to.

*The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author’s.

Roseanne Cancelled

The ABC hit comedy “Roseanne” was cancelled this afternoon after the star, Roseanne Barr, tweeted out a racist comment. The network decided that there was no way to have the main character on the show after the tweet hit the media, but the show wouldn’t be “Roseanne” without Roseanne Barr herself. To read more on the Roseanne scandal click CNN Roseanne.

ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE

Critically acclaimed exhibition ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE returns this April with a benefit auction hosted by ARTSY. Celebrate art for activism with works by more than 65 emerging and mid-career artists including Ann Lewis, Grace Graupe-Pillard, Rebecca Leveille, Michelle Pred, Indira Cesarine, Signe Pierce and Parker Day, among many others. Every work sold goes toward supporting the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and its mission to defend and preserve the rights and liberties guaranteed by the constitution of the United States. 

The ARTSY benefit auction features artwork across all mediums addressing the issues our society has been confronted with such as immigration rights, health care, reproductive rights, climate change, transgender rights, white supremacy, gender equality, gun control and more. It will additionally feature many new works by artists of the ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE exhibition.

Bidding opened today at 12 noon and will close on April 19th at 5pm! Head over now to bid and help raise funds for the ALCU. 

ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE BENEFIT AUCTION ARTISTS: 

Alexandra Rubinstein, Alyson Provax, Ann Lewis, Anna Rindos, Annika Connor, Anya Rubin, Bradford Scott Stringfield, Cabell Molina, Camilla Marie Dahl, Danielle Siegelbaum, Daryl Daniels, Desdemonda Dallas, Desire Moheb Zandi, Dessie Jackson, Diana Casanova, Dolly Faibyshev, Domenica Bucalo, Eleni Giannopoulou, Elisa Garcia de la Huerta, Elise Vazelakis, Erin Victoria Axtell, Fahren Feingold, Gabriela Handal, Grace Graupe Pillard, Hannah Stahl, Indira Cesarine, James Hsieh, Jamia Weir, Jamie Martinez, Jen Dwyer, Joanne Leah, Joel Tretin,Kate Hush, Katya Kan, Kristin Malin, Kristin O’Connor, Leah Schrager, Leslie Kerby, Leslie Sheryll, Lola Jiblazee, Lola Ogbara, Manju Shandler, Marne Lucas, Mary Tooley Parker, Michael Reece, Michele Pred, Miss Meatface, Nichole Washington, Olga Filippova, Olive Allen, Panteha Abareshi, Parker Day, Rada Yakova, Rebecca Leveille, Rosary Solimanto, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Rute Ventura, Sarah Dillon, Signe Pierce, Stephanie Hanes, Tatana Kellner, Tommy Mitchell, Touba Alipour, Valerie Carmet, Valery Estabrook, Vanessa Teran, Yuri Murphy

VIEW AUCTION CATALOGUE

BID NOW ON ARTWORKS

 

 SELECT PRESS ON
“ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE”

Vogue 
“The Untitled Space Gallery Checks In With Nasty Women, One Year Later

CNN
“Artists mark Trump’s inauguration anniversary with day of protest art”

The Guardian
“One Year of Resistance: the exhibit chronicling the year in anti-Trump art” 

INTERVIEW
“What One Year Of Resistance Looks Like In The Art World”

New York Daily News
“Trump’s America reflected in ‘One Year of Resistance’ art show” 

Good Trouble
“White Lies: One Year of Resistance”

Metro News
“80+ artists commemorate ‘One Year of Resistance’” 

 

 

PORSCHE WORKS TEAM

Introducing an all new title from Delius Klasing, Porsche Works Team, that illustrates the true nature of 24-hour races – the tension, exhaustion, and the dedication. World-famous photographer, Frank Kayser followed the Porsche team for three years, detailing a world previously unseen by outsiders.

Kayser and his team were allowed where other press photographers were not: in the pit, in the pit lane during the change of tries and drivers, and in the closed off areas of the racers quarters. Every photo in this book shows the stress, the top performance, the eternal night and the success of perfection.

A special signed edition of the book, limited to 99 copies is also available for sale.

Book Available here