Posts tagged with "policy"

Modest Carbon Tax

A recent MIT Sloan study found that a federal carbon price of $7 in 2020 could reduce emissions by the same amount as all of the flagship climate policies adopted by the Obama administration. In a paper released by the MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR , Prof. Christopher Knittel models the carbon price needed to achieve projected emission reductions under Obama-era vehicle mileage standards, the Clean Power Plan, and a biofuel mandate.

“This shows the power of a price on carbon,” says Knittel, who is director of the CEEPR. “As little as a 7-cent price increase per gallon of gasoline and less than half a penny per kWh of electricity could get us the same climate benefits as the fragile, costly, and litigious regulations that represent President Obama’s climate legacy. And let’s not forget that all these regulations are under attack by the current administration.”

In his study, he found that matching the emissions reductions forecast under each regulation would not be enough to get the U.S. on a long-term path to decarbonation. However, a carbon tax that increases over time could reduce emissions by the same amount as all of those regulations combined.

“We’re still only looking at $22 per tonne in 2025 and $36 per tonne in 2030 if we include all major greenhouse gases,” explains Knittel. “If we get really serious about climate policy, the costs will only rise, and the cost-saving potential of carbon pricing will become even more important.”

As decision makers in the U.S. consider policy options to revitalize U.S. climate policy for 2020 and beyond, Knittel says that these results could be a political game changer. “This first effort to model the carbon tax equivalent of alternative climate regulations could help build a consensus around more cost-effective policies. Instead of trying to bring back earlier rules such as the Clean Power Plan, a new administration would do well to focus on one of the many carbon tax proposals introduced on Capitol Hill by both sides of the political aisle.”

He adds, “If we can make a given climate outcome more affordable, then we can also aim higher sooner. And we know that, under all scenarios, we have to drastically increase our efforts to meet the climate challenge.” Knittel is the author of “Diary of a Wimpy Carbon Tax: Carbon Taxes as Federal Climate Policy.” MIT Sloan School of Management is where smart, independent leaders come together to solve problems, create new organizations, and improve the world. Learn more at mitsloan.mit.edu.

The Mueller Report

THE MUELLER REPORT: THE COMPLETE AND FINAL FINDINGS AGAINST PRESIDENT DONALD J. TRUMP

The highly controversial, and long-awaited Mueller Report featuring a shocking introduction by Carter Page, Ph.D.

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Fifty years from now, American children will read about how The Mueller Report was a, if not the, defining document of our time. Quite often the history books gloss over the “uglier” parts of our past. Let this be one of those times when we choose to collectively remember, rather than forget, in the hopes of forging a brighter, stronger future for the American people.   

With an introduction written by Carter Page, former foreign policy advisor to President Donald Trump’s campaign during the 2016 presidential election campaign, this edition frames the findings in a different light than we have previously seen. Some can argue that the investigation primarily targeted Page as a path to President Trump. His private life was utterly disrupted throughout the epic witch hunt by the Mueller investigation, though he ultimately was not accused of any wrongdoing whatsoever.

With only the redacted report available, much is left open to interpretation as our country finds itself on a precipice of serious change.  Page frames the report with his unique perspective, calling into question the gross abuse of power by the Democratic party, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the operatives who seek to, ironically, obstruct the Constitution themselves.   

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

The U.S. Department of Justice is the federal government’s justice administration agency, set with the task to defend the interests of the United States according to its laws by securing public safety against domestic and foreign threats, preventing and controlling crime, implementing justice for guilty parties, and guaranteeing unbiased law enforcement for all Americans.

ABOUT CARTER PAGE, Ph.D.

Carter Page, Ph.D. is Founder and Managing Partner of Global Natural Gas Ventures LLC in Oklahoma City and Global Energy Capital LLC in New York. Those businesses have been temporarily derailed due to a multimillion-dollar 2016 smear campaign funded by the Democratic National Committee and their associates, shortly after he volunteered for the Trump campaign’s early foreign policy committee early that year.  Following this election interference by political operatives in Washington and abroad, Dr. Page has more recently focused on helping to repair and protect American democracy. His current initiatives include various nationwide legal projects that may eventually assist in restoring the U.S. Constitution, including often forgotten principles such as Due Process and the Rule of Law.

Dr. Page has decades of experience as a foreign policy scholar, including a six-year term as a Fellow at the Center for National Policy where he focused on energy and foreign policy issues.  He has lectured extensively worldwide and past teaching experience includes service as an Adjunct Assistant Professor at New York University. Dr. Page is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, where he was a former International Affairs Fellow and Co-Director of the Council’s study group on the Caspian Sea region.  In this capacity, he conducted research on economic and investment policy in the former Soviet Union.

In addition to multiple tours in Europe and the Middle East as a U.S. Navy surface warfare officer, Dr. Page previously served as the Navy’s working group representative for nuclear nonproliferation policy issues at the Pentagon where he focused on negotiations with Russia.  He also initiated and led weekly meetings following the Navy’s selection as lead service for a Joint Staff issue team during an in-depth Department of Defense strategic counterproliferation review.

An Eagle Scout and previously a Catholic altar boy, Dr. Page graduated with Distinction from the U.S. Naval Academy where he was a Trident Scholar.  He holds an M.B.A. from New York University’s Stern School of Business, an M.A. in National Security Studies from Georgetown University and a Ph.D. from the University of London’s School of Oriental and African Studies.

Follow Carter Page on Twitter.

Influential Women at Wellesley

This January, Wellesley College will host several of the world’s most influential women, including Sally Yates, Wendy Sherman, Andrea Mitchell, Katharine H.S. Moon, and Madeleine Albright herself, as part of the Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs ninth annual Wintersession, a three-week intensive program at Wellesley that educates the next generation of women leaders.

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 Highlighted Events

●      On January 8, from 10:45 a.m. to 12 p.m., the Albright Institute welcomes Sally Yates, former U.S. Deputy Attorney General (2015-2017). Yates will present a keynote talk, “Principles Not Policy: Essential Norms in Preserving the Rule of Law,” exploring the vital role of trust in creating stable and just societies. This event will be available via livestream.

●      On January 16, from 2 to 3:30 p.m., a group of North Korea experts will present “Beyond the Headlines: Understanding Korea,” led by Katharine Moon, Edith Stix Wasserman Professor of Asian Studies at Wellesley and nonresident senior fellow with Brookings. This event will be available via livestream.

●      On January 24, beginning at approximately 6:40 p.m., Secretary Albright will present a dinner dialogue entitled “In the Balance: Setting a Course to Restore Democratic Principles” with Wendy R. Sherman, senior counselor at Albright Stonebridge Group and former U.S. Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs (2011 to 2015). This event will be available via livestream.

●      On the final day of Wintersession, January 25, Secretary Albright will join Andrea Mitchell of NBC News speaking at the closing ceremony for Albright Fellows. This event will not be livestreamed. 

About the Albright Institute Wintersession

This year’s Albright Institute Wintersession will educate a cohort of 48 Wellesley student fellows representing 18 countries, 18 U.S. states, and 26 majors. Following two weeks of classes and panels led by prominent speakers, the fellows spend the final week of the program working together in interdisciplinary groups to develop solutions that address a critical world issue. This year’s theme is “Harnessing the Power of Technology: Navigating Truth and Trust in a World Transformed.”

“The Albright Institute is educating the next generation of global leaders—with its interdisciplinary, experiential approach to learning and its expert faculty, talented students, and the powerful and influential women leaders it brings to Wellesley’s campus, including former Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright, Wellesley Class of 1959,” said Wellesley College President Paula A. Johnson. “The global problems we face—including threats to democracy, climate change, and poverty and income inequality—are increasingly complex and fraught, with the potential for worldwide repercussions. The Albright Institute is preparing its students to meet tomorrow’s challenges head on, and the world has never needed them more.”

More on Albright Institute Featured Speakers

Sally Yates, a 27-year veteran of the U.S. Department of Justice, spent more than two decades as a federal prosecutor in Georgia and was appointed U.S. Deputy Attorney General in 2015 by President Barack Obama. She was named acting U.S. Attorney General in January 2017 and served in that position for just 10 days before being fired for defying the Trump administration’s controversial travel ban—an executive order temporarily halting entrance to the United States from seven predominantly Muslim countries. Yates’s talk, “Principles Not Policy: Essential Norms in Preserving the Rule of Law,” will be moderated Lawrence A. Rosenwald, Anne Pierce Rogers Professor of American Literature, professor of English, and co-director of the Peace and Justice Studies program at Wellesley. The talk will be followed by a lunch with the fellows, who will have an opportunity to converse with Yates directly.

Albright Institute Director Joanne Murray said, “No one represents the mission of the Albright Institute better than Sally Yates—cultivating in fellows the habits of principled clarity, bold service, and courageous action to shape a better world.”

During her time as undersecretary of state, Wendy Sherman was the lead U.S. negotiator in the landmark nuclear agreement with Iran. For this and other diplomatic accomplishments, Sherman was awarded the National Security Medal by President Obama. According to Murray, Sherman “demonstrated the ability to bring opposing countries to consensus and to forge trust. She will share what deliberative negotiating means as Albright Fellows sort through potential policy solutions to the problems posed to them.”

The January 16 panel led by Professor Katharine H.S. Moon, “Beyond the Headlines: Understanding Korea,” will feature three panelists: Jieun Baek, a Ph.D. candidate in public policy at the University of Oxford, former research fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard, and author of North Korea’s Hidden Revolution: How the Information Underground is Transforming a Closed SocietyMelissa Hanham, senior research associate in the East Asia Nonproliferation Program; and a third panelist, who works on a variety of causes related to human rights issues, including rights for North Korean defectors in South Korea.

In addition to Yates, Sherman, and these experts, this year’s program will feature an array of other distinguished individuals, including Anne Richard, U.S. assistant secretary of state for population, refugees, and migration from 2012 to 2017, and Jonathan Zittrain, George Bemis Professor of International Law at Harvard Law School and professor at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and faculty director of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society.

About the Albright Institute

The Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs at Wellesley College supports the College’s mission of educating students for leadership in an increasingly complex and interconnected global environment. The program combines the intellectual resources of faculty from Wellesley, researchers from the Wellesley Centers for Women, and leading alumnae and other practitioners and policy makers in the fields of international relations and public policy.

About Wellesley College

Since 1875, Wellesley College has been a leader in providing an excellent liberal arts education for women who will make a difference in the world. Its 500-acre campus near Boston is home to 2,400 undergraduate students from all 50 states and 75 countries.

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