Posts tagged with "physical"

Ultimate Guide to Yoga Therapy

Yoga therapy represents a new approach to mental health that seeks to alleviate emotional pain and restore well-being through a series of meditative practices that involve both the body and mind.

Over the last decades, researchers and mental health professionals have realized what Hindu monks have been teaching for thousands of years – a holistic approach to psychological and physical health is the key to balance and well-being.

Yoga – which is the foundation of yoga therapy – is an extremely complex spiritual tradition that has a history of roughly five thousand years, rich literature, and clear practice guidelines.

Luckily, over the years, practitioners have simplified this approach and made it accessible to anyone who’s interested in self-exploration and self-growth.

Yoga Therapy: What is it?

Considered both an art and a discipline, yoga is an ancient Indian practice characterized by meditation and physical activity, which can improve the body’s flexibility, reduce stress, and cultivate an overall state of health and well-being.

Yoga therapy represents a collection of principles, techniques, and practices derived from Hindu philosophy and adapted to clinical settings. By using meditation, breathing techniques, and body poses, this approach aims to improve our overall health and promote a state of calm and well-being.

According to a 2013 study [1], yoga therapy helps people with mental illness by cultivating a state of calm, increasing awareness and focus, promoting acceptance and adaptability, and cultivating a sense of security.

Yoga Therapy Theory

In Sanskrit (a language of ancient India), yoga means union. In other words, yoga therapy promotes an integrative and holistic [2] approach to mental health.

The union that yoga therapists and practitioners often mention is that between body, mind, and spirit. Yoga teachings stipulate that once we unite these three fundamental aspects of human experience into one element, we can reach a state of balance and health on all levels.

Some practitioners go so far as to believe that spiritual enlightenment and true unity can only be achieved in India, the birthplace of Yoga.

However, this doesn’t mean that yoga – as a series of health-promoting practices – can’t be effective in other parts of the world. In fact, countless practitioners have successfully promoted and implemented this approach all over the globe.

How Does Yoga Therapy Suggest the Mind Works?

In yoga therapy, the relationship between body, mind, and spirit represents a fundamental element that can serve as an explanatory model for the cause of physical and mental illness and also provide a pathway to balance and healing.

We all strive, more or less consciously, to free ourselves from the limited notion of what we are or, more precisely, what we commonly believe we are. In broad lines, we tend to identify with our body, mind, possessions, relationships, social status, bringing all these elements into one comprehensive picture we call ‘life.’

But these mental constructs are merely shadows of the truth that lies within ourselves; a truth that’s often hard to understand because of ignorance, narrow-mindedness, or lack of self-awareness.

By taking a holistic approach to health, yoga therapy seeks to restore balance and well-being through a series of physical, mental, and spiritual practices.

Read more about yoga therapy HERE.

Why Some Women are Delaying Pregnancy

New Survey Shows Women Lacking Information for Informed Healthcare Decisions

New findings from a recent survey show that women living with chronic inflammatory or autoimmune disease feel they don’t have enough information to make informed decisions about how to balance pregnancy with disease management. Some women feel they have no choice but to stop treatment or delay their plans for pregnancy. These women are living with a variety of autoimmune conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn’s disease.

Now, a new initiative called the AIM (Autoimmune Motherhood) Movement is being launched to rally these women and provide support, information and a place for them to share stories about motherhood with chronic inflammatory disease. The education campaign and online community aims to help women learn the facts about their conditions and appropriate disease management options, while allowing them to share experiences to empower one another.

AIM Survey Shows:
• Almost half (44%) of U.S. women surveyed had concerns serious enough that they delayed their plans to become pregnant
• 61% believed they could not combine treatment and breastfeeding
• Only 41% consulted a healthcare professional before becoming pregnant, suggesting the need for women to become more engaged in treatment and pregnancy planning earlier

Dr. Grace Wright, rheumatologist at New York University Langone Medical Center is interviewed about the topic along with patient Rosanna, who shares her compelling story of living 30 years with rheumatoid arthritis and the physical and emotional challenges she endures while dealing with her disease. Both guests will help bring awareness to the issues surrounding ways to manage chronic inflammatory disease throughout the family planning journey. They’ll also reveal the results of the AIM Patient Survey to help others in similar situations make the best decisions for themselves and their families. See the recent interview down below:

International Day of Yoga

Consulate General of India presents The 4th International Day of Yoga on Saturday, June 16, 2018 at 11am at Picnic Point on Governor’s Island.
The admission to the event is free for to participate, but advance registration is required:
Free ferry access to Governor’s Island at 10am.
Consulate General of India is back again with the celebration of the 4th International Day of Yoga on June 16, 2018, bringing together communities to enjoy the spirit of Yoga.
Fifteen minute yoga and meditation sessions will be led by such organizations as Hindu Temple of North America, Mallakhamb Federation USA, Isha Foundation, Sahaja Yoga and the Art of Living Foundation, and the event will conclude with a live performance.
The United Nations proclaimed June 21, as the International Day of Yoga at the initiative of the Government of India. Yoga is an ancient physical, mental and spiritual practice that originated in India. The word ‘yoga’ derives from Sanskrit, means to join or to unite, symbolizing the union of body and mind. Today it is practiced in various forms around the world and continues to grow in popularity. International Yoga Day aims to raise awareness worldwide of the many benefits of practicing yoga.
About Consulate General of India
Sandeep Chakravorty, Consul General of India in New York, a member of the Indian Foreign Service (IFS) since 1996, has served in India’s Missions in several countries. Prior to becoming Consul General of India in New York in August, 2017, he was the Ambassador of India to Peru and Bolivia. Earlier he had been India’s Deputy Chief of Mission in Bangladesh. He has also served in Indian Embassies in Madrid and Bogota. In India’s Ministry of External Affairs he has held several positions including Press Relations Officer, Staff Officer to Minister and worked on desks dealing with Central Asia, East Asia and China.
Before joining the Government, Mr. Chakravorty worked with civil society organizations dealing with natural resources and environmental issues.

Diabetes × 11 Motivational Tips

Fight Your Diabetes and Finally Get Fit in 2018:

11 Motivational Tips for Getting Started

If you suffer from diabetes or prediabetes, being a couch potato is particularly dangerous to your health. Here, the American Diabetes Association and Dr. Sheri R. Colberg explain why staying fit is crucial to managing this disease—and offer 11 tips to get you excited about exercising just in time for the new year

Now that 2018 is finally here, you’ve decided that this year you’re finally going to better manage your diabetes, starting with that dreaded word: exercise. According to Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM, if you suffer from diabetes or are at risk for developing the disease, deciding to commit to fitness could be a real lifesaver. That’s why it’s more important than ever that you make sure this resolution sticks.

“Considering that more than 29 million people have diabetes and 84.1 million American adults have prediabetes, it’s crucial that a large number of people make lifestyle changes for the sake of their health,” says Dr. Colberg, who partnered with the American Diabetes Association to write the new book Diabetes & Keeping Fit For Dummies® (Wiley, February 2018, ISBN: 978-1-119-36324-8, $22.99).

“If you have diabetes or are at risk of developing it, exercising regularly is the single most important thing you can do to keep your blood glucose levels in check, reduce your risk of developing complications, and slow down the aging process,” she adds. “And the new year is the perfect time to commit to doing more physical activity.”

Although having diabetes increases your risk of getting health problems that can greatly reduce your quality of life, Dr. Colberg says you can fight back by keeping fit. Exercise enhances your body’s sensitivity to insulin. Many chronic diseases in addition to type 2 diabetes are associated with reductions in your insulin action, like hypertension and heart disease. Exercise may also enhance your body’s ability to produce more insulin. Plus, it lowers your risk of premature death, heart disease, certain cancers, osteoporosis, and severe arthritic symptoms.

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“Beyond just the physical benefits, exercise can have a positive impact on your mental and emotional health as well by lessening feelings of stress, anxiety, and depression,” she adds. “Being active can also positively affect your self-confidence, body image, and self-esteem.”

Knowing all those benefits may not be enough to get you motivated to start exercising more. So many find that the hardest part can be trying to find the motivation to begin. Read on for Dr. Colberg’s tips to get you moving in the new year and beyond.

Choose activities you enjoy. It’s human nature to avoid doing the things you really don’t like to do. If you absolutely hate running, it’s probably not the best activity to choose to get started with. Most people need exercise to be fun, or they lose their motivation to do it over time. By actually having fun with your activities, you will more easily make them a permanent and integral part of your routine. Try picking activities you truly enjoy, such as salsa dancing or golfing (as long as you walk and carry your own clubs).

“Maybe you haven’t found any activities that you enjoy much,” says Dr. Colberg. “If that’s the case, choose some new ones to take out for a test run (so to speak). Also, be sure to choose an exercise that suits your physical condition and overcomes or works around your limitations.”

Start off with easier activities. Dr. Colberg warns that exercising too hard right out of the gate will likely leave you discouraged or injured—especially if you haven’t exercised in a while. Instead, start slowly with easier activities and progress cautiously toward working out harder.

“If you often find yourself saying that you are too tired to exercise, your lack of physical activity is likely what’s making you feel sluggish,” says Dr. Colberg. “But after you begin doing even light or moderate activities, your energy levels rise along with your fitness, and your physical (and mental) health improves.”

Check your blood glucose for added motivation. When starting a new exercise, use your blood glucose meter or continuous glucose monitor to check your blood glucose before, during (if you’re active for more than an hour), and after your workout. Why? A reading that changes—especially in the direction that you want it to—can be very rewarding and motivating. You will be able to see evidence of real results. If you don’t check, you may never realize what a positive impact you can have on your diabetes simply by being active.

“Let’s say your blood glucose is a little high after you eat a meal, and you want it to go lower without taking (or releasing) any more insulin,” says Dr. Colberg. “You can exercise after your meal and bring your blood glucose down within two hours after eating and taking insulin, or you can avoid or lower post-meal spikes in your blood glucose. You wouldn’t know the extent of the effect you can have without using your blood glucose meter or continuous glucose monitor to check.”

Spice up your routine. One of the chief complaints about exercise is that it is boring. Feelings of boredom with your program can be the result of repeating the same exercises each day. To keep it fresh, Dr. Colberg suggests trying different physical activities for varying durations and at different intensities. Just knowing that you don’t have to do the same workout day after day is motivating by itself.

“You may want to do a variety of activities on a weekly basis, an approach known as cross-training,” says Dr. Colberg. “For example, you can walk on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday but swim on Tuesday and take dance classes on Saturday. In addition to staving off boredom, adding variety to your workouts has many other advantages as well, such as using different muscles so more muscles get the benefit of exercise training.”

Find an exercise buddy (or several). You don’t have to go it alone when being active. Having a regular exercise buddy keeps you accountable, increases your likelihood of participating, and also makes your activities more social and fun. Get your spouse, family members, friends, and co-workers to join in your physical activities. Having a good social network to support your new or renewed exercise habit helps you adhere to it over the long run.

“Your community may be a good place to look for other exercise options,” says Dr. Colberg. “Take the time to find out what’s available in your area. You can often find groups of health-conscious people walking together during lunch breaks, or you may be able to join a low-impact aerobics or other exercise class offered at your workplace, community center, or recreation center. The more you can get involved in making your lifestyle changes a part of a larger community, the more likely you are to be successful in making them a lifelong habit.”

Set goals… Setting goals can help keep your interest up and be a great motivator. For instance, if you walk for exercise, you may want to get a pedometer and set a goal of adding in 2,000 more steps each day. But when laying out your fitness goals, be realistic and avoid setting unreachable goals that will sabotage you from the start. That said, if you do have large goals, great! Break them down into smaller, realistic stepping stones (such as daily and weekly physical activity goals). This will help keep you on track and keep you from becoming too overwhelmed with trying to accomplish your goal.

“Using a fitness tracker, activity log, or fitness app may also be a good idea for helping you reach your exercise goals,” says Dr. Colberg. “Figure out what works best for you.”

…And don’t forget to reward yourself. Having goals is great, but with no reward, what motivation do you have for reaching them? When you reach an exercise goal, be sure to reward yourself (but preferably not with food!).

“No one ever said that sticker charts and non-food treats are just for kids,” says Dr. Colberg. “Maybe you can promise yourself an outing to somewhere special, the purchase of a coveted item, or another treat that is reasonable and effectively motivates you to exercise. If you do miss one of your goals, try to make the rest of them happen anyway. Then reward yourself when you meet any of your goals, even if you don’t make them all happen.”

Have a Plan B ready just in case. Always have a backup plan that includes other activities you can do in case of inclement weather or other barriers to your planned exercise. For example, if a sudden snowstorm traps you at home on a day you planned to swim laps at the pool, be ready to walk on the treadmill or try out some resistance activities (like abdominal crunches and leg curls). Even if you don’t enjoy your second-choice exercise as much, you can always distract yourself to make the time pass more pleasantly. Read a book or magazine, watch your favorite TV program, listen to music or a book on tape, or talk with a friend on the phone while you’re working out.

“Keeping an exercise routine can be a slippery slope—especially when you’re starting out,” says Dr. Colberg. “One roadblock can be all it takes to set you back. By having a backup plan, you are still keeping your body active in some capacity and are less likely to quit altogether.”

Schedule your workouts. You show up for your doctor’s appointments, so why should scheduling your physical activity be any different? Write your exercise down on your calendar or to-do list just like you would any other appointment. Scheduling it into your daily activities will help keep you from making excuses. If you already have the time blocked off, you will be more likely to do the activity.

“Never make the mistake of assuming exercise will happen just because you claim that you want to do it a certain number of days per week or month,” says Dr. Colberg. “It takes some planning ahead and the commitment to make it a priority.”

Take advantage of opportunities for “SPA time.” How many times have you driven around a parking lot to find a spot close to the door instead of just parking farther away and walking? When you do that, you’re missing out on an opportunity for spontaneous physical activity (SPA). There are plenty of ways to incorporate SPA into your daily routine. If you have a sedentary desk job, take the stairs rather than the elevator whenever you can. Walk to someone else’s office or the neighbor’s house to deliver a message instead of relying on the phone or email. Guess what? You’ve just gotten yourself more active without giving it much thought.

“Keep in mind that you don’t have to do activities at a high intensity for them to be effective,” says Dr. Colberg. “Adding in more daily movement in any way possible is likely to benefit your health. These could include gardening, doing housework, walking the dog, or even just standing while talking on the phone.”

Take small steps to get yourself back on track. Even after you’ve developed a normal activity routine, it can be easy to get off track. If you’re having trouble getting restarted, simply take small steps in that direction. You may find you need to start back at a lower intensity by using lighter weights, less resistance, or a slower walking speed. Don’t overdo it to make up for lost time. Starting out slowly with small steps will help you avoid burnout, muscle soreness, and injury.

“If you don’t want to exercise on a given day, make a deal with yourself that you’ll do it for a short time to get started,” says Dr. Colberg. “After all, getting started is often the hardest part. Even doing only 5 to 10 minutes at a time (rather than 30 minutes or more) is fine. After you’re up and moving, you may feel good enough to exceed the time you planned on doing in the first place. The key is to begin through any means possible.”

“When it comes to living with diabetes or prediabetes, exercise is very powerful medicine, and the side effects are all good ones,” concludes Dr. Colberg. “This is why it’s so important to get motivated and commit to an exercise routine, because it will change your life and put you on the road to wellness. Make 2018 the year that you take charge of your life, get fit, and discover better health at last.”

About the Author:

Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM, is the author of Diabetes & Keeping Fit For Dummies®. She is professor emerita of exercise science from Old Dominion University and an internationally recognized diabetes motion expert. She is the author of 12 books, 25 book chapters, and over 300 articles. She was honored with the 2016 American Diabetes Association Outstanding Educator in Diabetes Award. Contact her via her websites (SheriColberg.com and DiabetesMotion.com).

About the Book:

Diabetes & Keeping Fit For Dummies® (Wiley, February 2018, ISBN: 978-1-119-36324-8, $22.99) is available at bookstores nationwide, from major online booksellers, and direct from the publisher by calling 800-225-5945. In Canada, call 800-567-4797. For more information, please visit the book’s page on www.wiley.com.

Man Runs for Hope, Respect, Love and Unity.

Man to Run Across North America from Los Angeles to New York to Champion Hope, Respect, Love and Unity for Americans and its Global Neighbors.

North America DNA Vol. Run

#HumanRace

#DNARUN #WeAreOne

Who Really Runs The Country?

Jonathon Prince does. As a visionary “Athli-vist” (athlete-activist), Prince has run over 8,000 miles through 24 states, inspiring hope and raising awareness for his philanthropic endeavors. In 2005, he launched Run 4 Relief with a 2,700-mile run from Los Angeles to Atlanta, stopping to receive the key to the city in New Orleans. The following year, his Run for Relief II took him on a 1,500-mile trek from Atlanta to New York City. Both runs raised money to support families displaced by Hurricane Katrina. In 2010, he created HopeOrDie, promoting the cause with a 3,000-mile run from Santa Monica to Washington, DC.

Now Prince is about to make his fourth cross country trek North America DNA Vol. RUN #TheHumanRace. This run is to champion unity, hope, respect and love for Americans and its global neighbors.

Prince felt compelled to make this run. He said, The times call for people to realize we are more alike than different and we all have potential to create shining moments that exemplify our highest selves and create the kind of world we all deserve to live in. I just want to do something that gets people to think about that”.

Prince will launch the run at the Santa Monica Pier, California on Saturday, August 26, 2017 at 7:00am PT and will run cross country 10-30 miles a day, 5 days a week for four and a half months, totaling 3500 miles to New York, with an expected arrival time between Christmas and New Year’s Eve.

The cities on the run route include Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Flagstaff-Sedona, Az., Albuquerque, NM. Dallas, Houston, Tx. New Orleans, Mobile & Montgomery, Alabama, Atlanta, Ga. South & North Carolina, The DC, Maryland & Virginia area, New Jersey and arriving in New York City. Supporters can track the run on Instagram at @iamrunner. Prince will pass through Christian, MS, where he received the Key to the city with Robin Roberts.

Students from UCLA, USC and Santa Monica College, Los Angeles area run clubs, Road Runners of America, Compton city officials and We ROCK kids, running group in Orange County have all been invited to the launch to attend and share the kick off moment.

Sponsors who have joined the movement in support include 23andMe, Clear Eyes, GoChef TechnologiesROCKSTAR Energy and Joint Movement.

With the wrapped DNA Vol. RUN support vehicle, Team Prince will visit community organizations, high schools, colleges & universities along the way to run with, make appearances at and speak to students, faculty and staff about his experience on the road and how DNA Vol. RUN can enhance the lives of all of us.

Prince, who is a new dad, is excited to have his young sons Miles (Age 4) and Chase (age one) cross the finish line with him in New York. He says, “This is my first cross country run as a dad. I didn’t have children on the last runs. I’m shopping for a really sturdy double stroller with jogger wheels that can withstand a mile run across the finish line with my kiddos. I’m going to get them baby goggles so the wind doesn’t bother their eyes. Its going to be so amazing to be able to tell them when they grow up that they crossed the finish line with daddy. This race is after all for them and all children. It’s for all of us really.”

Prince will make pit stops in cities across the country to rest, eat, say hello to old and new friend along the way. He invites people to join him for a warm hello along the trail or even to run with him part of the way for as long as they are able.

He says, “I hope to meet many people along the way. If I see you and you’re up to it, please run with me for a half mile. Or just wave as I run by. Say a prayer for me, it gets lonely sometimes on the road. If I make a pit stop in your town, let’s take a selfie and post on your Instagram, so we can inspire people together! Remember your greatness and that we are one. I’ll see you soon!”

Interested in knowing your past and unlocking your full potential? Visit DNA Weekly.

About Jonathon Prince:

Athlete, International Runner, Speaker, Investor and Philanthropist, Jonathon Prince has logged over 12,000+ of 30k miles in support of a cause or ideal.

Recognized by Ebony magazine for representing the “Future of Philanthropy,” Jonathon has pioneered the role of “Social Athi-vist,” using his feats of endurance to promote positive change.

Links : Website/Instagram