Posts tagged with "physical therapy"

Go Ahead, Stop & Pee: Running During Pregnancy and Postpartum ,Dr. Blair Green PT, DPT, 360 MAGAZINE

Five Exercises to Alleviate Symptoms of Pelvic Floor Dysfunction


By Dr. Blair Green PT, DPT

Do you leak urine when you cough, sneeze, run or jump? Do you experience pressure in the pelvis that feels like something is falling out? Do you struggle with chronic constipation? Do you experience pain with intercourse or with wearing tampons? If you can answer yes to any of these questions you may suffer from pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD).

PFD affects at least 25% of women, and the prevalence rises in an athletic population to nearly 40%. While pregnancy and childbirth are risk factors for PFD, many women who never become pregnant may also experience these symptoms.

The pelvic floor muscles (PFM) connect from the pubic bone to the tailbone and form a hammock-like structure on the underside of the pelvis. PFD occurs when these muscles are not able to perform their normal function. The PFM assist with urinary and defecatory function, sexual arousal and orgasm, and pelvic organ support. In addition, the PFM make up the most inferior part of the core, working with the diaphragm, abdominals and low back muscles to provide central core control.

Alleviating and preventing problems with the PFM can sometimes be as simple as incorporating specific exercises. Research shows that one of the best ways to prevent urinary leakage is to work on strengthening the PFM. However, to maximize function and improve problems, the PFM must also learn how to relax as well as contract, and work alongside the other muscles in the deep core, as well as with the muscles of the hips and legs. If you are experiencing symptoms of PFD, consider trying the following exercises:

  1. Deep Diaphragmatic Breathing – The diaphragm and PFM work as a team. Deep breathing through the diaphragm can help the PFM relax, and can also help them contract properly. When you inhale, the PFM relax and lengthen, and when you exhale they contract and shorten. Try lying on your back with your knees bent. Place your hands on the outside of the rib cage. As you inhale, the ribs should expand and the chest and belly should rise. As you exhale, the ribs should move down and in, and the chest and belly should fall. Continue to breathe for up to 10 – 20 repetitions. This can also be done sitting, standing, lying on your side, or on all fours.
  2. PFM Activation, aka “Kegel” exercises – This exercise serves to contract the PFM, which is an important mechanism to assist control of bowel and bladder function, and support for the pelvic organs. While the PFM should be strong, to counter high forces that the body encounters with lifting, jumping and running, It is just as important that the muscles can fully relax between contractions. Begin with deep diaphragmatic breathing. Inhale to prepare. As you exhale, imagine a kidney bean at the opening of the vagina. Squeeze and lift the kidney bean, contracting the PFM. Hold for up to 10 sec as you continue to breathe. Relax. Repeat up to 10 times. For variety in the PFM Activation exercise, try to imagine that the muscles are an elevator. As you exhale, the elevator is rising from the first to the fifth floor. As you inhale, it lowers back to the first floor. You can also practice quick contractions where you hold the muscle tight for one to two seconds and then let it go. It is important to keep breathing through all of these exercises.
  3. Bridging – This exercise incorporates breathing, PFM activation and spinal movement. It lifts the hips above the shoulders which can help assist gravity to improve pelvic pressure. Lie on your back and begin with diaphragmatic breathing to prepare. As you exhale, contract the PFM and begin to curl up one vertebra at time, lifting the hips off the floor. At the top, the trunk should form a straight line from the shoulders to the hips. Inhale to pause at the top, and exhale to reverse the movement, rolling the spine and hips back to the floor. Repeat 10-20 times.
  4. Happy Baby – This yoga pose is a great way to coordinate breathing with pelvic floor relaxation. Lie on your back. Lift your legs, bending the knees, so that the feet are facing the ceiling. Grab under your feet with your hands. Hold this position as you take 5-10 deep breaths.
  5. Assisted Squatting – Deep squatting may exacerbate signs of urinary leakage or pelvic pressure. Using a strap or holding onto a door for assistance, or limiting range of motion, are two ways to complete a squat movement with less downward pressure on the PFM. Stand, holding onto the back of a chair, doorknob or strap. Take one breath to prepare. On the next inhale, lower down toward the floor, bending at the hips and knees. As you exhale, activate the PFM, and use the glute (buttock) muscles to stand up. You can use your arms for assistance to pull up to reduce pressure on the pelvis. Repeat 10-20 times.

Not every problem with the PFM can be fixed with exercise, and not all exercises are appropriate for every person. If you feel like you are not improving, or these exercises make your symptoms worse, please consult a pelvic health physical therapist or your doctor. The best way to treat PFD is a multi-disciplinary approach combining physical therapy, medical management, behavioral strategies and exercise.

BLAIR GREEN, PT, DPT, co-author of Go Ahead, Stop & Pee: Running During Pregnancy and Postpartum, is a Doctor of Physical Therapy with a focus on pre/post-natal health and wellness, the founder/CEO of Catalyst Physical Therapy, and a board-certified orthopedic specialist. Known as the “go-to” expert in her field, Dr. Green is also a Polestar-trained Pilates instructor and a Certified Manual Trigger Point Therapist. She serves as an instructor in the Physical Therapy program at Emory University, and as a faculty member for several Physical Therapy continuing education companies.

6 Therapies To Alleviate Pain Linked To Diabetes And Other Health Issues

The complications associated with diabetes are many, and chronic pain is common for many who suffer from the disease – especially back pain.

Most adults experience back pain at some point in their lives, and almost half suffer neck pain. Usually, an injury or other musculoskeletal issue is associated with either affliction, although on occasion a disease may be linked to the problem as well.

Just as an example of the latter, researchers at the University of Sydney recently found that diabetics are at significantly higher risk of lower back pain and neck pain. While the report couldn’t establish a causal relationship between type 2 diabetes and back or neck pain, the research team pointed to preventable problems, such as obesity and lack of exercise, as contributing factors.

But whatever the source of any neck or back problem, finding that underlying cause is key to developing a treatment program that can both alleviate the pain and act as a form of prevention, says Dr. Bradford Butler, a chiropractor and author of The Blueprint for Back Pain Relief: The Essential Guide to Nonsurgical Solutions (www.drbradfordbutler.com).

“Most patients have a combination of problems causing their pain,” Butler says. “It’s very rare that just one thing needs to be treated.

“It doesn’t make sense to treat just the symptoms and not fix what is causing them. Many people, however, aren’t getting the correct therapy, so to them it’s no longer fixable. But it is – as well as preventable in the future with the right therapy.”

Butler has tips on treatments that can heal neck and back pain:

  • Acupuncture. Like chiropractic, acupuncture is a mystery to many people. “Its roots are deep in health and healing, and not in back pain alone,” Butler says. “More and more medical research is showing how incredibly effective it can be. Some studies show that it’s more effective than pain medications, and acupuncture produces actual results – it doesn’t just mask the symptoms.”
  • Chiropractic care. This a popular way to solve joint problems associated with almost all back and neck problems. “A spinal adjustment is the safest and most effective way to mobilize the joints,” Butler says. “Flexibility and range of motion of the affected segments is increased, disc circulation is improved and nerves function better.”
  • Massage therapy. “Massage is a powerful healing tool,” Butler says. “It helps to treat pain, inflammation, and spasm associated with back pain of all levels.” A highly trained massage therapist aids in breaking down scar tissue and increasing blood flow to the affected area, which accelerates healing while aiding the body in lymphatic drainage.
  • Neuromuscular reeducation. There are two different types of muscles that control the spine: voluntary and involuntary. “Voluntary muscles control global movements of your entire spine or region, movements such as bending and turning,” Butler says. “Involuntary muscles are controlled directly by the brain and central nervous system. Neuromuscular reeducation uses specific exercises and movements to stimulate your brain to retrain these involuntary muscles and make a better connection.”
  • Physical therapy. “Physical therapy helps increase range of motion, strengthens the spine against injury, and improves posture and gait,” Butler says. “Some people think about physical therapy only as it pertains to post-injury, post-surgical recovery, but it’s also critical to longevity.”
  • Spinal decompression. “This therapy has been a game-changer in the treatment of patients with back pain who have degenerated, bulging, or herniated discs,” Butler says. “It’s the most advanced nonsurgical treatment for discs. It can be used for discs in the neck or lower back.”

“Singular treatments rarely work,” Butler says. “A properly designed plan should include multiple therapies for most people if the goal is to fix the problem.”

Top Tips to Help Women Treat Carpal Tunnel

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, women are three times more likely to suffer from carpal tunnel syndrome than men, making even the most basic repetitive tasks like typing, using a computer, chopping vegetables and gardening painful. The associated pain or numbness in the hands and wrist that can radiate up the arm and hinder the ability to work is caused by the median or ulnar nerves in the wrist becoming compressed by repetitive motion. The good news is, the pain associated with carpel tunnel can be relieved without surgery. A good fitting wrist brace and a simple exercise, holding the arm out straight and flexing the hand at the wrist, can relieve the pressure on the nerve.

Testing for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

There are two definitive tests that physicians use to diagnose carpal tunnel: Tinel’s and Phalen’s.

 

  • The Tinel’s Test. If tapping on the underside of the wrist causes shooting pains in the hand, it is considered positive.
  • The Phalen’s Test. If the hands feel heavy, tingling, burning, or numb when holding both wrists in a back-to-back position in front of the body, with the wrists bent at 90 degrees for 90 seconds, it is considered positive.

 

Carpal tunnel is sometimes mistaken for thoracic outlet syndrome. The tightness, soreness and restrictions in the neck, shoulder, chest muscles and/or a slight shift in one of the ribs – often attributed to thoracic outlet syndrome – can actually result in symptoms much like carpal tunnel. The good news is that easing the symptoms of both carpal tunnel syndrome and thoracic outlet syndrome may be accomplished with a correctly fitting wrist support.

Wrists are not one-size-fits-all. Women’s wrists are, on average, 10 percent narrower than men’s, so it’s important their wrist support is made just for them. The Wellgate for Women Perfect Fit Wrist Support, for example, helps to ease the painful symptoms of carpal tunnel, tendonitis, arthritis and sprains by keeping the wrist in a neutral position to relieve pressure on the median and ulnar nerves during the day and at night.

The American Physical Therapy Association offers these tips for women to limit their chances of getting carpal tunnel syndrome:

  • Consider using a wrist brace at night and when playing sports to support the wrist in a neutral position.
  • Take frequent breaks from activities that require repetitive motion, even cooking tasks.
  • Move only your fingers and keep your wrists straight when typing.
  • When typing, make sure your spine is flush with the chair back, your shoulders are relaxed, and your feet are flat on the floor.
  • Keep your computer monitor at eye level.

 

Women should not just assume they have to live with pain.

 

About the Author

Dr. Holly Herman has been a physical therapist for more than 43 years, with a full-time private practice in Cambridge, MA. Dr. Herman provides expert care for women and men seeking careful, considerate diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic and other medical conditions. She is dedicated to training physical therapy and other healthcare professionals worldwide.

 

Man Runs for Hope, Respect, Love and Unity.

Man to Run Across North America from Los Angeles to New York to Champion Hope, Respect, Love and Unity for Americans and its Global Neighbors.

North America DNA Vol. Run

#HumanRace

#DNARUN #WeAreOne


Who Really Runs The Country?

Jonathon Prince does. As a visionary “Athli-vist” (athlete-activist), Prince has run over 8,000 miles through 24 states, inspiring hope and raising awareness for his philanthropic endeavors. In 2005, he launched Run 4 Relief with a 2,700-mile run from Los Angeles to Atlanta, stopping to receive the key to the city in New Orleans. The following year, his Run for Relief II took him on a 1,500-mile trek from Atlanta to New York City. Both runs raised money to support families displaced by Hurricane Katrina. In 2010, he created HopeOrDie, promoting the cause with a 3,000-mile run from Santa Monica to Washington, DC. 

Now Prince is about to make his fourth cross country trek North America DNA Vol. RUN #TheHumanRace. This run is to champion unity, hope, respect and love for Americans and its global neighbors. 

Prince felt compelled to make this run. He said, The times call for people to realize we are more alike than different and we all have potential to create shining moments that exemplify our highest selves and create the kind of world we all deserve to live in. I just want to do something that gets people to think about that”.

Prince will launch the run at the Santa Monica Pier, California on Saturday, August 26, 2017 at 7:00am PT and will run cross country 10-30 miles a day, 5 days a week for four and a half months, totaling 3500 miles to New York, with an expected arrival time between Christmas and New Year’s Eve.

The cities on the run route include Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Flagstaff-Sedona, Az., Albuquerque, NM. Dallas, Houston, Tx. New Orleans, Mobile & Montgomery, Alabama, Atlanta, Ga. South & North Carolina, The DC, Maryland & Virginia area, New Jersey and arriving in New York City. Supporters can track the run on Instagram at @iamrunner. Prince will pass through Christian, MS, where he received the Key to the city with Robin Roberts. 

Students from UCLA, USC and Santa Monica College, Los Angeles area run clubs, Road Runners of America, Compton city officials and We ROCK kids, running group in Orange County have all been invited to the launch to attend and share the kick off moment.

Sponsors who have joined the movement in support include 23andMe, Clear Eyes, GoChef TechnologiesROCKSTAR Energy and Joint Movement.

With the wrapped DNA Vol. RUN support vehicle, Team Prince will visit community organizations, high schools, colleges & universities along the way to run with, make appearances at and speak to students, faculty and staff about his experience on the road and how DNA Vol. RUN can enhance the lives of all of us.

Prince, who is a new dad, is excited to have his young sons Miles (Age 4) and Chase (age one) cross the finish line with him in New York. He says, “This is my first cross country run as a dad. I didn’t have children on the last runs. I’m shopping for a really sturdy double stroller with jogger wheels that can withstand a mile run across the finish line with my kiddos. I’m going to get them baby goggles so the wind doesn’t bother their eyes. Its going to be so amazing to be able to tell them when they grow up that they crossed the finish line with daddy. This race is after all for them and all children. It’s for all of us really.”

Prince will make pit stops in cities across the country to rest, eat, say hello to old and new friend along the way. He invites people to join him for a warm hello along the trail or even to run with him part of the way for as long as they are able.

He says, “I hope to meet many people along the way. If I see you and you’re up to it, please run with me for a half mile. Or just wave as I run by. Say a prayer for me, it gets lonely sometimes on the road. If I make a pit stop in your town, let’s take a selfie and post on your Instagram, so we can inspire people together! Remember your greatness and that we are one. I’ll see you soon!”

About Jonathon Prince:  

Athlete, International Runner, Speaker, Investor and Philanthropist, Jonathon Prince has logged over 12,000+ of 30k miles in support of a cause or ideal.

Recognized by Ebony magazine for representing the “Future of Philanthropy,” Jonathon has pioneered the role of “Social Athi-vist,” using his feats of endurance to promote positive change. 

Links : Website/Instagram