Posts tagged with "perform"

Leroy Sanchez

Critically acclaimed singer-songwriter Leroy Sanchez will embark on a 14-city tour, kicking off October 17 in Los Angeles, CA in support of his new single and video, “Preacher,” set to release in partnership with BroadbandTV (BBTV) on all digital streaming platforms October 19. Select dates are in support of multi-platinum recording artist Andy Grammar’s national “The Good Parts” tour. Tickets are now available at www.leroysanchez.com.

“I have never felt so strongly about a song or the vision for it. It shows a very personal side of me that I’ve never shown before. It’s not easy to be vulnerable in front of an audience, but being honest and facing our weaknesses is what makes us stronger,” says Sanchez.

“Preacher” premieres on YouTube on October 19 and is now available to pre-save on Spotify and Apple.

Sanchez’s 2017 debut EP “Elevated” has garnered over 10 million digital streams (and growing), earning him two Teen Choice Award nominations and an opportunity to perform with Clean Bandit on the 2017 broadcast. The release of his debut single Man Of The Year received praise from Billboard and People.

In addition to having over 3.8 million subscribers on YouTube, Sanchez’s accolades include two Platinum-certified singles in Spain – Blas Canto’s “El No Soy” and Malu’s “Invisible.”

Over the past 18 months Leroy has grown a devoted fan base performing 100+ showsin over 20 countries, including sold out headline shows in Los Angeles, New York City, Chicago, Toronto, Amsterdam, London, San Francisco, Cologne, Madrid, and San Diego. Additionally, he has toured and worked with many notable industry hit makers, including Machine Gun Kelly, where he’s featured on the rapper’s track “Gone”, and now multi-platinum recording pop artist Andy Grammar.

Follow @Iamleroysanchez.

Tour Dates:

*supporting Andy Grammar’s “The Good Parts” tour

10.17 – Los Angeles, CA – Hotel Cafe

10.27 – Memphis, TN – Minglewood Hall*

10.28 – Oklahoma City, OK – The Jones Assembly*

10.30 – Omaha, NE – Slowdown*

11.01 – Boise, ID – Knitting Factory Concert House*

11.03 – Stateline, NV – South Shore Room at Harrah’s Lake Tahoe*

11.05 – Sacramento, CA – Ace of Spades*

11.06 – Las Vegas, NV – House of Blues Las Vegas*

11.08 – Anaheim, CA – House of Blues Anaheim*

11.09 – Ventura, CA – Majestic Ventura Theater*

11.10 – Phoenix, AZ – Crescent Ballroom*

11.12 – Dallas, TX – House of Blues Dallas*

11.13 – Austin, TX – Emo’s*

11.14 – Houston, TX – House of Blues Houston*

Arlissa Wows Lakers

RISING STAR ARLISSA WOWS LAKERS HOME OPENER WITH HER STUNNING RENDITION OF THE NATIONAL ANTHEM!

WATCH HERE: https://youtu.be/XNS2MWrLxbU

WATCH ARLISSA PERFORM POWERFUL THE HATE U GIVE ANTHEM “WE WON’T MOVE” ON GMA DAY HERE: https://gma.abc/2yPEHIL

Anuel AA

Since the release of the album “Real to death”, the pioneer of Trap Latino, Anuel AA, has not stopped receiving good news and a wonderful response from his fans, who have downloaded the songs from the album in a massive way, making him creditor of different recognitions just two months after its premiere.

Since its controversial launch and without having made a promotion to date, “Real to death” is already a Platinum record in the United States, and also holds the coveted certification of the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America). Taking into account that there are more strict requirements and it is more difficult to certify an album than a single, this has been a great achievement to be the first musical production of this exponent of the urban genre. Not just an achievement for him, but for the urban genre in general, since Anuel AA is the only Latin solo artist to obtain a Platinum Record for an album released this year.

“When we thought about making the record, we never imagined that all these blessings would come, especially being an independent label, which shows me that I must always be faithful to my genre and to the fans who have supported me from the beginning,” said Anuel AA.

On the other hand, some of the songs on the album, “Real hasta la muerte”, have received their own recognitions individually. The song “Yeezy”, a duet with the Puerto Rican Ñengo Flow, became a Gold Record, as well as “Na Nuevo”, for its large number of downloads on digital platforms.

For its part, the theme “Brindemos” along with his great friend and fellow genre, Ozuna, reached the rating of Double Platinum, while the themes “Want to drink” and “Hypocrite”, which performed a duet with Zion, reached both Platinum Disc certification.

BROCKHAMPTON To Perform at Shrine Expo Hall

After wrapping up an expansive and widely-celebrated European tour, BROCKHAMPTON returns home to announce their new North American fall tour which will make a stop at Shrine Expo Hall. This will take place on November 28th at 9 PM and tickets will go on sale Saturday, September 8th at 10 AM HERE.

Beginning on October 3rd in Mesa, AZ, the hardest working boy band in show business will play 27 date4s across North America including festival sets at Austin City Limits and Tyler The Creator’s Camp Flog Gnaw before concluding on Dec. 6th in Las Vegas.

In addition to the new tour announcement, BROCKHAMPTON announced their new album Iridescence which will arrive this month in September. The new album arrives no the tail end of a successful tour run that saw BROCKHAMPTON play a string of 5-star reviewed, sold-out European tour dates including back-to-back London shows and two highlight sets at Reading and Leeds Festivals.

In Reading, the group was brought on stage to close N.E.R.D’s set, with Pharrell shouting out his “little brothers” after a wild performance of “Lemon.”

Don’t miss your chance to see BROCKHAMPTON at Shrine Expo Hall. Tickets start at $39.00, plus applicable service charges.

Shrine is located at 665 W. Jefferson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90007.

Liquid Phase

The Song Chronicles the Journey of Singer Joe Coss and His Travels From LI’s East End to New York City As He Worked as Lead Mechanical Engineer on the new World Trade Center

From 2005 to 2013, Joe Coss – lead vocalist of Long Island based band Liquid Phase spent his days traveling from Long Island to downtown New York City to work as the Lead Mechanical Engineer on the new World Trade Center. His journey became chronicled in the band’s song “Bright Colors”, which brings to light the poetic landscapes from the cliffs of the East end to the “Castles” of the cities skyline.

Liquid Phase, the NYC Rock Band from Montauk, is a five piece rock outfit featuring Coss on Vocals and Guitar, Jamie Grubb on Keyboards, Dan Zellan on Guitar and Vocals, Dan Collins on Bass, and Steve Collins on Drums. The band brought its diverse blend of colorful laid-back surf and skate beach music as well as its hard hitting electric rock and alternative sound to stages across the U.S., opening for guitar legend Slash of Guns n’ Roses and famed Southern Rockers Lynyrd Skynyrd.

Watch: “Bright Colors” Video

“Bright Colors” is an infectiously upbeat song which brings to light Coss’s love for both the city whose most triumphant landmark he’s had the privilege of erecting to the oceanside oasis that is Montauk, NY. This comes to light in the songs lyrics “See a row of purple roses live on the oceanfront // And the cliffs of Earth eroding slower than we have fun // When I climbed up the iron ladder the sky was the bluest one // Looking out as our friends were leaving just as the keg was done” and coming full-circle with “Look West as the sun sets, castle stands in our way // Out East there’s an orange moonrise, radar’s aimed our way”.

The song – coupled with Coss’s diverse background (from his days as a Berklee College of Music student to his work in theoretical physics) and his relationship with legendary Singer/Songwriter Paul Simon and wife Edie Brickell – have made for an incredibly unique blend of infectious rock and pop. The band was invited by Brickell to rehearse in Simon’s home studio in Montauk while Joe also worked on Guitar Lead’s and Charts with Edie before receiving a prized gift – Edie’s custom Orange Electric Tom Anderson Guitar.

Now, as the band continues to write and perform throughout the NY area and all over Long Island – they’ll bring their unique sound to fans new and old!

To Check Out “Bright Colors” and More of the Band’s Music, VISIT: Reverbnation.com/LiquidPhase1/Songs

For More on Liquid Phase, VISIT www.LiquidPhaseMusic.com

Singer & Songwriter RAYLA

Let’s talk about your single “Boys Like You” – Can you tell us a bit about the song and the creation/recording process?

I love the creative process of writing songs, you never know what you are going to get when you go into the studio. “Boys Like You” was not really something I planned. It came out of a very personal experience. I was in a pretty unhealthy relationship where no matter how badly I was being treated, I kept going back. Once I realized it and that I didn’t need him anymore, I got out! Writing the single “Boys Like You” is actually what helped me to get OUT of that bad relationship. I really wanted to share the experience because so many girls may be going through the same thing. The song really has an empowering message and I’m so excited by the support and reaction it has been getting.

Can you share about the kinds of songs you write and what motivates you when you’re writing a song?

All aspects of my life give me ideas for songs. Things my friends are going through, things I see at the movies or events that are going on in the world, even a conversation I have with someone can spark an idea for a new song. My songs are like my personal diary I just let the world see. Lately I have been writing really happy songs and songs that I think are empowering to woman today.

How would you describe your sound?

My sound is definitely a little more on the pop side. Honestly, I just love to create music so I don’t usually put a box on my sound, I sort of let it figure itself out.

Which artists are you looking up to now?

My music taste changes all the time. Currently I really like Ed Sheeran, because of the way he writes his music and does his live performances. It’s very acoustic and feels very real. Camila Cabello is another artist who I really like her sound and her independence. She seems authentic and like that she’s her own person. And also, Halsey because she is just so dope and I would love to sing with her someday.

If you could collaborate with any other artist, who would it be?

That’s a really hard question because there are hundreds of people I could pick, but right now I would probably choose Ed Sheeran. I’m so intrigued on his writing styles and how authentic he is, so I think it’d be so cool to experience a session with him.

What can fans be expecting from you in the near future?

Definitely new music on the way! I’ve filmed music videos for some of my new material that I’m really excited to be released. And I have a few surprises coming as well!

What do you like to do for fun when you’re not in the studio?

I recently got my driver’s license so this summer my friends and I have spent a lot of time at the beach. I really love hanging with my friends and being a normal teenager.

Where can we find you on social media?

Instagram: @rayla

Twitter: @rayla

Facebook.com/raylamusic

BIO:

Rayla is an impressive, emerging singer/songwriter who is making waves in the music industry. Handpicked to open for the likes of Daya, Olivia Holt and Jana Kramer, this 17-year-old’s fresh, unique sound delivers songs that are packed with relatable lyrics. Her debut single “Boys Like You” has received an overwhelmingly positive response. She loves to be able to put her own original stamp on the music she creates, as evidenced both in her covers of popular songs, and in her original music.

As a toddler, Rayla would find any stage on which to perform, including on top of her family’s dishwasher. Writing her first song at the age of five, Rayla credits Halsey, Camila Cabello, Taylor Swift, and Ed Sheeran to be major influences to her career. Music has always been a dominate part of her life and she is eager to make her own imprint in the music scene.

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

2 Chainz ft. Drake & Quavo

2 CHAINZ DROPS SUMMER BANGER “BIGGER THAN YOU” FEATURING DRAKE & QUAVO!

https://2Chainz.lnk.to/BiggerThanYou

2 CHAINZ TO PERFORM AT 2018 BET AWARDS JUNE 24TH

NEW SEASON OF 2 CHAINZ TV SHOW “MOST EXPENSIVEST” DEBUTS ON VICELAND JULY 10TH

WATCH THE TRAILER HERE:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEtKRV5BXq0