Posts tagged with "Paul Rosenberg"

DEF JAM RECORDINGS LAUNCHES 35TH YEAR OF EXPLOSIVE NEW ARTISTS

The ongoing rollout of new music from Def Jam Recordings’ rookie lineup – including the Bay Area’s Sneakk and Lul G of SOBxRBE, Brooklyn MC Fetty Luciano, Cleveland’s YFL Kelvin, Harlem rappers TJ Porter and Dominic Lord, Georgia’s 17-year old Bernard Jabs, Jacksonville’s 18-year old YK Osiris, Minneapolis’ Nimic Revenue and others – comes to a head with the arrival of UNDISPUTED: a new branded compilation and platform designed to introduce Def Jam’s next generation of stars.

UNDISPUTED is set for release on March 8, 2019.

As Def Jam Recordings rolls into its 35th year as the UNDISPUTED greatest brand in hip-hop history, the legendary label has its sights focused squarely on the future. With a new executive team headed up by CEO Paul Rosenberg and EVP Steven Victor, a new in-house creative content team, and a new-look roster comprised of over a two dozen new signings, Def Jam is once again building a foundation and blazing a trail that wholeheartedly embraces the new: amazing new music, bold new content, strong and creative new leadership.

“During the course of the past year, in collaboration with our talented EVP Steven Victor and our incredible team of executives, we have worked diligently to define the label we strive to become,” said Def Jam Recordings chairman & CEO Paul Rosenberg. “One of the most important aspects of our efforts has centered around building a new roster. Together with these incredible new artists we have developed urgent, cutting-edge, and truly great new music and content. As we proudly enter our 35th anniversary year, I’m excited to launch this project, one that I think defines and encapsulates our new direction.”

“I believe in artistry and the idea that great music will find its audience,” said Steven Victor, Def Jam Recordings EVP & head of A&R. “I’m beyond excited about the roster of new artists we’ve built here at Def Jam. Each one of them is making the kind of music I want to listen to now. We’ve brought them together and asked them to buy into something larger, the Def Jam logo and legacy. It’s remarkable to see how much these artists have embraced it. I couldn’t be more proud of the results.”

An exclusive platform for the next-gen artists who are the lifeblood of Def Jam, UNDISPUTED showcases a spirit of collaboration and unity frequently unseen under the banner of a label. The material was recorded during several week-long collaborative “Rap Camp” sessions produced by Victor, Def Jam VP of A&R Anthony “AE” Edwards, and in-house producer Rico Beats. The comp is led by “Spray” from SOBxRBE affiliate Sneakk featuring fellow Cali MCs and Compton natives Tyga and YG, released early in December, 2018.

The release of UNDISPUTED will be accompanied by the 8- part “Undisputed”documentary film series, created by Def Jam’s new in-house creative content team.  The documentary project was spearheaded by Def Jam’s Executive Vice President of Brand Strategy & Content, Noah Callahan-Bever, who served over a decade as Editor-in-Chief and Chief Content Officer of Complex. The documentary series deftly chronicles “Rap Camp,” featuring the cast of UNDISPUTED artists and Def Jam A&R’s as they introduce us to their stories, collaborate creatively, define their sound, and push each other to new levels.

 

DEF JAM CELEBRATES THE HOLIDAYS WITH COURVOISIER & KLASSE14

Last night at the famed China Chalet in downtown New York City, Def Jam Recordings welcomed a packed house of VIP guests to celebrate the season at the annual Def Jam Holiday PartyDef Jam artists Jeezy, Valee, DaniLeigh, Bibi Bourelly, Arlissa, Bobby Sessions, TJ Porter, Fetty Luciano, Def Jam CEO Paul Rosenberg, NBA star Chris Bosh, The Breakfast Club’s DJ Envy and more sipped Courvoisier cocktails like the French 75” and were treated to VIP gifting by the luxury accessories brand Klasse14. Partygoers danced to the sounds of DJ Boof and DJ Cassidy until the morning hours.

DEF JAM × KANYE WEST, ALESSIA CARA, YG, 2 CHAINZ, & MORE

MOVING THE CHARTS AND MOVING THE CULTURE: OVER 1 BILLION STREAMS GLOBALLY; FOUR CONSECUTIVE TOP 5 ALBUM DEBUTS IN JUNE; 6 NEW TRACKS ON SHAZAM’S US FUTURE HITS CHART; EIGHT TRACKS SIMULTANEOUSLY IMPACTING AT RADIO

Fueled by an aggressive slate of new albums and singles and led by a new executive team – has launched into the summer season with ever-increasing heat. Ignited by Kanye West and G.O.O.D. Music, Def Jam artists have generated over 1 billion cumulative streams globally in the past month, and new music from Alessia Cara, Logic, YG, 2 Chainz and Jeremihis poised to dominate the charts all summer long.

“We’ve been very fortunate to be treated to this unprecedented schedule of game-changing releases from the inimitable Kanye West and his G.O.O.D. Music label,” said Paul Rosenberg, chairman and CEO of Def Jam Recordings. “I’m very pleased with how the team has responded and the success we have shared so far.”

With his historic five album run – yielding an unprecedented four consecutive Top 5 chart debuts in as many weeks from Pusha T, Kids See Ghosts, Nas, and his own #1 album yeKanye has once again grabbed control of the culture and shifted the paradigm. By releasing five 7-song albums, including the most-recent, critically acclaimed K.T.S.E. from Teyana Taylor – in consecutive weeks, Kanye has changed the concept of the album rollout, at once impossibly shortening the runway and elongating the news cycle, while unspooling the narrative with each release. In effect, the five albums have created a 35-song “playlist” across multiple genres: old school, sample-heavy rap, progressive, melodic hip-hop, R&B, psychedelic rock-rap, and more.

In addition to five albums lodged in the Top 25 on Apple Music, songs by Def Jam artists have also netted 19 debuts on the Billboard Hot 100. Charging headlong for the charts, Alessia Cara’s “Growing Pains,” #1 Most Added at Top 40 radio for two weeks running, and one of six new Def Jam tracks on Shazam’s US Future Hits Top 20 chart, including: “Yikes” and “All Mine” by Kanye West, “Bigger Than You” by 2 Chainz, “The Light”by MihTy (Jeremih & Ty Dolla $), and “Cops Shot The Kid” by Nas.

Def Jam’s seasoned promotion staff has an astonishing 8 tracks going for adds across multiple formats at radio – including “If You Know You Know” by Pusha-T, and “Big Bank” by YG. Propelled by an acclaimed BET Awards performance and the new music video trending at #3 on YouTube, “Big Bank” has exploded at Apple Music, Spotify, and Shazam.

At the same time, multi-platinum, Grammy®-nominated Def Jam artist Logic is headlining a sold-out tour in support of his #1 mixtape Bobby Tarantino II, the follow-up to Everybody, recently certified platinum. The mainstream worldwide success of Logic’s 4x-platinum “1-800-273-8255” is still reverberating more than a year after its release: last week 1-800 was awarded a Gold Lion for Artist as a Cause Ambassador at the annual Cannes Lion global brand conference.

Grammy®-nominated multi-platinum singer/songwriter Jhené Aiko’s life-affirming album TRIP is also on the verge of RIAA gold certification, after spinning off two global hit singles, the gold “While We’re Young,” and platinum “Sativa” featuring Rae Sremmurd, each with over 100 million streams.
Behind the scenes at Def Jam Recordings, the company’s amazing new digital team has implemented new strategies to grow social followers and engagement. Def Jam now boasts the #1 social following of all major record labels, with an Industry-leading 400+K followers on Instagram, over 900+K followers on Twitter and growing. The five G.O.O.D. Music/Def Jam releases alone have amassed over 70 million mentions and counting.

In another first for the label, Def Jam has employed an aggressive Direct-To-Consumer strategy to become the#1 D2C label within the Universal Music Group (UMG). This has been driven largely by the new G.O.O.D. Music releases, with creative, robust offerings of merch, vinyl, and special products including lithographs, cassettes and more.

While rolling out new projects from its heavy-hitting roster of stars, Def Jam is bringing a fresh crop of talent into the marketplace, with new music from recent signing like YK Osiris, Bobby Sessions, G.O.O.D. Music’s 070 Shake & Valee, PVRX, Fetty Luciano, and more.

Bobby Sessions New MV

BOBBY SESSIONS PLANS A REVOLUTION IN NEW MUSIC VIDEO “PICK A SIDE”

WATCH HERE:
https://BobbySessions.lnk.to/PickASideVideo

LISTEN TO “PICK A SIDE” HERE:
https://BobbySessions.lnk.to/PickASide
BOBBY SESSIONS IS TRYING TO START A DIALOGUE
WATCH THE DALLAS RAPPER’S NEW VIDEO FOR “PICK A SIDE.”
http://www.thefader.com/2018/06/13/bobby-sessions-pick-a-side-video-interview?utm_source=tftw

When Bobby Sessions released the video for his major label debut single “Like Me” with Def Jam Records in April, viewers witnessed a visceral, charged statement. With a noose around his neck, the Dallas rapper drew parallels between lynchings and modern day police killings with a captivating intensity in his delivery and lyricism. By the end of the record Sessions defies the oppression that systemic injustice meant to induce in him.

Today, Bobby Sessions’s latest single “Pick A Side” premieres on The FADER and the artist’s mission continues to unfold. With “Pick A Side,” Sessions sets his sights on controversial black figures, equating the behavior of Candace Owens, Jason Whitlock, Ray Lewis, Omarosa and more, who are addressed in the track and music video, to house slaves informing on the subversive activity of slaves in the field. “The same way a person would sacrifice his or her relationship with the people on the field in order to get in good with the master, we have the same thing happening today where there are black people in positions of power and positions of influence that have opportunities to shed light on real situations affecting their own people,” Sessions says. “Instead, they dismiss them in the pursuit of getting the acceptance of white people in positions of power and it needs to be called out.”

The video showcases how a revolution happens. It starts small with pictures of the people Sessions believes need to pick a side while speaking to his people and as he’s delivering the information he’s posing to them, which side are you on?

In February, when it was announced that you signed with Def Jam you mentioned quitting your job in 2015 and dedicating yourself to becoming a great rapper and manifesting this current success. Can you explain that process a little more?

When you’re working a job, after you pay all your bills, you’re broke anyway. At least at my pay rate I was. I was spending all my money on music. I would go to work from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., I would sit in traffic in a car with no AC in record hot Texas summers from 5:30 to 6:30 maybe eat from 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., and I would would record from 7 p.m. to 2 a.m. at the Dojo every single day. That was my thing. By the time I got done paying for that and paying for my bills, I was broke anyway. I thought, I’m either gonna stay here and be a hamster in the wheel or I can be out there and go for my dreams. I’m in my early twenties making these decisions. I can go back and still get a job later if that’s really what I want to do but the real fear and real danger is not doing it because I was scared of me being 50 and 60 living with “what if?” It was super easy to leave and that’s the reason I mentioned quitting my job.

How did signing to Def Jam fit into the vision you had yourself and your career?

I always fantasized about how it would feel to sign with Def Jam and then I got signed by Eminem’s manager (Paul Rosenberg, now the CEO of Def Jam), and the way I always thought that that would feel… it didn’t feel any different than how much I peacocked my chest out when I walked out of my old job. When I signed my contract in New York it felt the same way when I imagined that I signed the contract. That’s the main message that I try to get out to people. The reality that I lived in is that I’m the greatest rapper that ever came from Dallas. I don’t think of any other reality other than that in regards to Dallas in particular. And since that’s true, then, of course, I’ll have the right energy to attract my deal going through to when I shot my first video. Of course I came out of that, because that was my mentality before that was a consensus with everybody else.

What are you trying to manifest through your music?

I want to make material that’s way bigger than me. I’ve been talking about race in particular on all my projects. Go back to Law of Attraction and my album cover is a gorilla that’s literally shredding its outer. The gorilla represented the negative image that white people have on black people. So you saw me as an animal but I’m shattering your view of me with this art and through the law of attraction. My broad mission is to empower all black people around the world. That’s my main mission.

I feel like there’s a lot of psychological damage, psychological trauma that we inherited that never got addressed and it’s still never been addressed. It’s been quiet, it’s taboo to even be talking about. It’s a bunch of things that need to be addressed globally. The effects of white supremacy all around the world and [I want to] do as much as I can to get us as a people to manifest and be our best self. My individual goal, I want to make sure that when we look back at the history of the greatest rappers ever, I want my name to be mentioned at the top of the list. As I’m getting older, I’m realizing that individual goal is subjective. The impact that I really have in the booth that’s what I want to be measured by.

Tell us about the new single, “Pick A Side.”

The song is talking about field and house niggas and how you have to pick a side. This is a different time and this is not a time where you can straddle the fence. Our generation’s done a good job of, “let’s try to see all sides of everything.” OK, after you evaluated … pick a side. Don’t be scared of what side you’re standing on.

Even thinking back to slave times, you had the field negroes outside picking the cotton, manning the land and then you had the house negro, who was inside the house, typically lighter skinned, and he had a bunch of temporary privileges over the black people in the field. When the master and the master’s family is done eating, you get the scraps at the end. You also notify me if there’s some people on the field doing something they’re not supposed to be doing you come tell it to me. We have the same thing happening today where there are black people in positions of power and positions of influence that have opportunities to shed light on real situations affecting their own people but instead they dismiss them in the pursuit of getting acceptance of white people in positions of power and it needs to be called out.

In the video that would be Candace Owens, Jason Whitlock, Ray Lewis, right?

There’s two people in particular I call out on the record: Jason Whitlock and Ray Lewis. [Lewis] is someone I really idolized as a football player, and, when I heard his comments on Colin Kaepernick, how he should only worry about football, I felt like he was trying to appease the white people at his network as opposed to shedding light on our community. So it’s not to say he is a house nigga, it’s to say that I need you to pick a side and don’t think that these white people love you for having these opinions. If the white people you work with truly care about humanity they will let you say that. You don’t have to throw your community under the bus in order to get cool with another community. If we’re all supposed to be one community it should make a white person sick to their stomach that black people are getting murdered for no reason if we’re really all one race.

“Pick A Side” was a bit of a hometown affair featuring production from Sikwitit and video direction from German Torres, two creatives you’ve worked with for a long time in Dallas. Why was it important to keep it close to home?

It’s important to take care of home first. We have some great content from both of those guys so we wanted to give them the first dibs on creating content for us now that we have this new platform. Sickwitit and I have done a lot of great records together and I think we’ve crafted a song together and I think I’m excited for everybody to experience it for the first time. This one is different because the style of these songs as compared to the other songs are very different. We’re definitely two different people than when we first started. The sound now is a lot more disruptive.