Posts tagged with "pasta"

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

Margot

By Vaughn Lowery × Krishan Narsinghani × Michael Moadeb × Anthony Sovinsky

Restaurateur Rohan Talwar helms IB Hospitality and owns the illustrious West Hollywood gem, Norahs. A few months ago, he opened the doors to modish and culinary oasis, Margot – complete with exotic dishes, regional wines and special drink menu.

Margot, a Mediterranean infused restaurant composed of various seating and dine-in areas with 360 degree views of West LA, in Culver City is a diamond in the rough. The rooftop (indoor and outdoor seated venue) nests at the top of the PLATFORM (a boutique shopping experience with fashion/pop-ups, wellness and bites) and borders tons of retail, commercial and a new hotel soon erupting. The speedy Expo line train can be seen swiftly running east to west while you sip and/or dine outside and mimics the likes of some of the more prestigious eateries within Brooklyn’s Dumbo area. Similar to the train, rumors have quickly traveled throughout the city that Amazon will begin developing a new location nearby.

‘Hot like fire’ understates the atmosphere at night as the outside appears to be torched with tons of heat lamps in tow. With fresh farm-to-fork ingredients and handmade pastas (try the spaghetti), this place is a soon to be staple within the LA area. The menu constantly changes for an all-inclusive dining experience, including those with strict plant-based diets. Great for romantic dates, celebratory moments and family gatherings on ‘Sunday Funday’ largely due to their tapas as well as fresh raw seafood bar. Talk about delectable oysters. Step foot inside to find every inch of this establishment scream social media engagement wall. Note murals and tapestries all aligned in tune with a modernistic and contemporary ambiance. Service is extremely courteous, helpful and hospitable. And if that’s not enough to keep you coming back, the handcrafted cocktails will. Try their refreshening grapefruit gin and juice or a fruity frosé – worth every penny. It’s about time Culver City got what it deserved – a casual dining experience with budding professionals who seek something edgy, youthful and tasty.

Boost your metabolism before you eat, as SoulCycle is located on the second floor right underneath Margot. Or, after a zesty salad and sandwich at Margot, you may want to head down to the first level to the cozy ice cream shop with a menu of small-batch flavors, Van Leeuwen Ice Cream.

*Margot is open daily from 11am-2am.

Highlights
• Accommodates approximately 150 seated or 350 for reception
• Rooftop patio with dedicated bar accommodates approximately 120 seated or 150 for reception
• Intimate private dining terrace available for approximately 25 seated or 40 for reception
• Social dining options available for weekend brunches, lunch and dinner
• Market driven menu inspired by coastal mediterranean cuisine
• Full service bar with handcrafted cocktails made with fresh ingredients
• Stunning beach and city views throughout

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

Stuttgart Beer Festival

This September, Stuttgart is celebrating a bicentennial double jubilee: 200 years of the Stuttgart Beer Festival along with 100 years of the Agricultural Show. The city will commemorate the founding of these two biggest festivals in the state by King Wilhelm I of Württemberg and his consort, Queen Katharina, with the Historic Volksfest that will start a few days before the agriculture and beer festivals. All of the merriment for the Historical Festival will take place on the Palace Square in the center of Stuttgart surrounded by the New and Old Palaces whereas the modern day beer festival and the agricultural festival, will be celebrated on the Canstatter Wasen, once a grassy plain not far from the city center.

On 28th September 1818, the day after the king’s 36th birthday, he founded the first agricultural show to strengthen and reform the region’s farming industry, which had been severely affected by the eruption of the volcano on the island of Sumbawa in today’s Tambora. This volcano had a big impact on Europe and resulted in the “year without a summer,” when gasses and ash caused climate changes leading to crop failures and famine in southern Germany.

The fact that 2018 is the 173rd and not the 200th anniversary of this merry traditional festival is easily explained: by order of King Karl, the Wasen was held only biennially from 1882 onwards, and this continued up to the king’s death in 1891. This, along with the repercussions of the two World Wars, resulted in Stuttgart having to go without its festival for 28 years in all.

Every four years, the agricultural festival still takes place and runs parallel to the beer festival on the Canstatter Wasen. These days, the LWH is the biggest agriculture and forestry show in southern Germany. This year, from 29 September to 7 October 2018, Stuttgart will again be transformed into Baden-Württemberg’s biggest farm. It will include a multitude of topics to do with nutrition, animals, sustainability and agriculture.

Starting on September 26, the Historical Volksfest will be the real draw this jubilee year as it will be a nostalgic view down memory lane for the locals and offer a unique look at Stuttgart’s past for the visitors. History will be the dominant feature of the celebratory Volksfest on Stuttgart main square, the Schlossplatz. Visitors can look forward to a colorful mixture of activities with fairground attractions and rides from times past, including jugglers, acrobats, old traditional crafts and farm animals. Two avenues will include fairground amusements that will be split up into the 19th and 20th century styles.

An exhibition showing the history of the local Swabian people’s biggest festival will take place around the Jubilee Column while King Wilhelm I and his wife Katharina, played by amateur actors dressed in historical garb, will make regular appearances. A festival tent with about 1,000 seats will be a focal point along with a dance floor, traditional dances and bands performing in historical clothes. Classical dishes of the era such as “Metzelsuppe,” a sausage soup, sauerkraut, boiled beef and fish on sticks, will be served with a jubilee beer made by the Stuttgart breweries, Stuttgarter Hofbräu and Familienbrauerei Dinkelacker.

Just two days later, the contemporary beer festival (often referred to as the Canstatter Wasen) gets underway! On the last Friday in September, the 28th of September, the seven beer tents, the two wine tents and the Alpine Village will open their doors to the public and the fairground rides will get under way. Round about the Fruit Column, the historic symbol of the traditional festival, 330 showmen, hosts and stallholders have a wide variety on offer. A double-looping roller coaster, autoscooters or Chair-O-Planes: modern attractions or old favourites – they’re all here at the Wasen. Hearty dishes such as grilled knuckle of pork, fried steak or Swabian “Maultaschen” (filled pasta) are served to go with the mugs of beer.

Canstatter Wasen is a benefit to Stuttgart’s economy not only for tourism but also for the local trades. Traders’ markets have a long tradition in Stuttgart and were part of the original foundation of the beer festival as the traveling tracers brought stayed to sell their goods. Even though times have changed, traders’ markets have remained and are a permanent and much-loved part of the beer festival on the Cannstatter Wasen. Visitors will also be given an insight into traditional craftsmen’s and traders’ markets showing old crafts, such as brush and basket making. In addition, household goods made of wood and other natural materials will be on sale.

As the second largest beer festival in the world after Oktoberfest, the Canstatter Wasen attracts approximately four million visitors including more than 20,000 Volksfest club members (former German emigrants and their families) from New York, Philadelphia and Chicago who regularly visit the Cannstatter Volksfest to affirm and renew their ties of friendship with Stuttgart. Benefitting from the festival are not the visitors but also bakers, butchers, suppliers, the service industry, the retail trade, hotels, transport companies and lots more businesses. According to a market survey, approximately 17,000 people are directly or indirectly involved in the Cannstatter Volksfest.

Doctor Tries Fasting Trend

Real Doctor Tries the Intermittent Fasting Trend and Here’s What Happened https://tourocom.touro.edu/academics/faculty/harlem/niket-sonpal.php

There’s crash dieting, and then there’s intermittent fasting. Crash diets aren’t sustainable and rarely factor in healthy food options. Intermittent fasting on the other hand is gaining attention because people are seeing weight come off, and therefore stay with it. It’s being touted as the go-to way to lose 15, 20 pounds within a month or two. Is it just a popular hashtag or can the weight actually stay off leading millions of people to reach their weight goals? To get clarity, we spoke to Dr. Niket Sonpal who not only is Board Certified in Internal Medicine specializing in Gastroenterology; but lost 8 pounds his first week of intermittent fasting when he decided to do it himself. Here’s what he has to say about intermittent fasting.

What inspired your decision to do intermittent fasting?

I noticed the winter weight became the spring then summer weight and I wanted to take off extra pounds that I noticed had crept on. I was with friends talking about how they lost weight during Ramadan (would prefer religious observations) and that intermittent fasting was a “thing.” I rolled my eyes. I was skeptical. Then I went online and applied my doctor mind to the concepts I was reading about it and went for it.

There are several ways to go about intermittent fasting. Which way did you do it, when did you start and what was the result?

This is true. The way I chose, and the way I would imagine most people would try, is the one that calls for 16 hours of fasting with 8 hours of eating time per day. This basically means if your last meal of the day is 8pm you will have your first meal by noon the following day, free to eat until 8pm again. I figured since I sleep most of those hours, it wouldn’t be as tough as another option where you fast for 5 days and eat for 2 with a 500-800 calorie intake limit on those 2 days.

What were the challenges (if any) that you faced when intermittent fasting?

I live across the street from a bagel shop in New York City. I also have delicious New York pizza on every other corner. Cravings and temptation were there for me for sure. When I left my home and smelled those fresh bagels my brain said. “let’s eat.”

Coming at your intermittent fasting as a doctor, what were some things you were thinking about that others must consider too?

I thought when I would fast. When would be my 8-hour eating period. When we start caloric consumption right when we wake up we do better with weight loss. However, that would mean eating from 7 am until 4pm. This would require a later meal around 3pm. Then I thought, does my lifestyle better allow a 12 noon to 8pm food window?

I also thought about the physiological aspect to what happens to our bodies when we fast intermittently. For one thing, it facilitates weight loss by enhancing hormone function. Insulin levels also lower, plus there’s a rise in noradrenaline. This combination is what helps us to breakdown body fat for energy. While this all reads well on paper there is a lifestyle aspect to it that must be factored in. I’ll add that anyone with a condition should consult with their doctor before going all in on intermittent fasting.

Why do you think it is so difficult for people to fast? What are some of the common symptoms people feel when fasting and what causes them?

When people think of fasting they think of starvation and deprivation. They anticipate they will feel terrible will have a growling stomach, dull headaches, and a bad mood. While these are common symptoms felt at first when fasting, the 16/8 intermittent fasting option allows for food every day. When people see quick results, they stick with it.

What was your diet? What did you cut out and add in?

I looked at my schedule and my overall daily lifestyle and how food was involved. For people who live very hurried lifestyles, food is typically something that is grabbed fast on the go. When we approach food this way no diet will be sustainable. I realized this would require consistent changes in my behavior. It would also require me to get very mindful about what I was eating during the 8 hours of eating time. I chose to eat what I liked in moderation. So, if two slices of pizza twice per week was the lunchtime norm, I reduced to it to once slice. I still ate pasta just not as often and not as much. I also added in a lot more vegetables, proteins, healthy fats and cut out all fast food and soda. Hey, I’m a doctor, but also a human!

For those thinking about intermittent fasting, how would you advise them to proceed?

I would explain that at around the 2 to 4-week mark, someone may plateau. When you notice this don’t think this is the most weight you are able to lose. This is normal and if you are also exercising with weight or resistance training you may be building muscle mass. Pay attention to how clothes fit, body fat loss and how weight loss shows beyond the scale. Knowing how over time the body gets used to intermittent fasting and starts to store up all that is eaten, leading to less weight loss, I suggest resetting your body by eating small, healthy meals throughout the day for a week and then resuming the 16/8 intermittent fasting option again.

People may happily think that they can fast and then enjoy a big bowl of pasta or cheeseburger. What kinds of foods should people eat during intermittent fasting?

You can get results without cutting out your favorite foods which means enjoy that burger or pasta, I did! However, you can’t binge on fast food and think you’re going to make any lasting changes. You want to up your vegetable intake. Things like grilled zucchini or eggplant make for great sides to a piece of grilled chicken or steak. Avocados are a good staple for healthy fats and are versatile. There are loads of recipes out there so plan out your food options in advance, so you stick with it.

About the doctor:

Dr. Niket Sonpal is Assistant Professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, Clinical instructor at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, Brooklyn and on the board of the NY‐American College of Physicians (NYACP). He is also the associate program director for the Internal Medicine residency program at Brookdale Hospital Medical Center. He is trained in Internal medicine, Gastroenterology and has a focus on Men’s and Women’s health.

14 MINIMALIST TRAVEL POSTERS

Minimalism is all the rage at the moment thanks to writers like Fumio Sasaki, so why not apply that approach when planning your next vacation? There’s so much information out there that it can seem overwhelming when you start researching places to go, with so many offers, travel guides, blogs, photos, videos, podcasts and all the rest. Sometimes you just need to drown out the noise and focus on what’s important.

That’s why Expedia has created these minimalist travel posters to help you see the essential elements on 14 of the top vacation destinations in the world. They’ve picked out the most important aspects of each destination, namely where you should go first, what food you should eat and where you can get that one stunning and shareable photo for your Instagram or Facebook page.

If you go to Berlin, for example, a whistlestop tour using these posters would take you to the aptly-named Panoramapunkt for a panoramic view of the TV Tower, followed by a trip to the past at the historic Brandenburg Gate. For food options, currywurst is a spicy taste of Berlin life and culture, while you can finish your stay with an energetic and symbolic bike ride down the Mauerweg, which follows the route of the old Berlin Wall.

Swapping Germany for South Africa, Cape Town has plenty to offer, even in the snapshot form of a minimalist visit. Speaking of snapshots, Bloubergstrand is the place to go to get that iconic photo of Table Mountain while you’ll also want to keep your camera to hand when you’re at Boulders Beach so you can get a shot of the penguins. Yes, there really are penguins there. The Neighbourgoods Market in Woodstock is a good place to get souvenirs, while the recommended dish of the trip is potjiekos, a traditional meat stew.

As you’ll have seen from these two examples, there’s so much you can fit into even a minimalist travel poster if the destination is as exciting as Berlin or Cape Town. Others getting the minimalist treatment include Havana, London, Paris and even the Serengeti and Siam Reap, the Cambodian home of 800-year-old temple Angkor Wat. You can probably guess what the iconic photo from that trip would be.

So check out all 14 of these minimalist travel posters from Expedia and see which of the legendary destinations captures your imagination. Given that you can take in all the sights in just one day, you could even do a tour…

 

Delectable dishes at Pietro's Trattoria in Lodi, California Photo Credit: Pietro's Trattoria

Pietro’s Trattoria a Lodi favorite

360 Magazine Culture Editor Tom Wilmer reports from Lodi, California at Pietro’s Trattoria

Pietro’s has been a favorite with Lodi, California locals since the Italian eatery for three decades.

Family owned by Jim and Annette Murdaca, Wilmer stopped in for a visit with their son, Chef Pete who spent a year and a half learning the craft as an stagiaire (intern) in Calabria and Parma Southern Italy.

CLICK HERE to listen to the NPR/KCBX Podcast interview with Chef Pete

Pete Murdoca in the kitchen at Pietro's in Lodi California

Come along and discover how Pete has infused the family Trattoria with an Old-World cooking style predicated on not only sourcing super fresh locally-sourced ingredients, but also harvesting greens from their own garden.

 

A random sampler of Pietro’s dishes that we savored includes the killer Murdaca’s minestrone soup ($6.50); Capri pizza–with tomato sauce, fior di latte cheese, sausage, basil and calabrian chile ($15); and the Risotto Funghi–Italian rice prepared with portobello, shiitake and white mushrooms topped with truffle oil ($19).

 

 

Pietro’s Trattoria is well worth the detour next time your motoring up or down Interstate 5.