Posts tagged with "paintings"

DREAMstate

Joseph Lee | Dennis Osadebe | Erik Mark Sandberg | Joshua Vides

September 12 – October 12, 2019

GR Gallery is thrilled to present “DREAMstate”, featuring for the first time artists Joseph Lee, Erik Mark Sandberg, Dennis Osadebe and Joshua Vides in a fresh, groundbreaking group exhibition. The show puts together 20 pieces, including paintings, works on paper and installations. The title is inspired by the unique creative energy that connects the four artists, able to forge, through different visions and techniques, an oneiric reality that misleads our visual realm.

Opening reception: Thursday September 12th, 6:00pm – 9:00pm(Exhibition Dates:September 12th– October 12th 2019). Members of the press can contact GR gallery in advance to schedule a private viewing and/or an interview with the artists before the exhibition is officially open. Visitors who want to attend the opening can RSVP by contacting the gallery.

Where: GR Gallery, 255 Bowery (between Houston & Stanton) New York, NY 10002 |  info@gr-gallery.com | tel: +1 212 273 2900

WhoJoseph Lee (1987, Indiana), Dennis Osadebe (1991, Lagos)Erik Mark Sandberg (1975, Los Angeles), Joshua Vides (1989, California)

DREAMstate” aims to exhibit the exclusive artistic approach of these four internationally known and trendsetting talents that are bringing new vitality into a specific technical and aesthetical idea, through the use of patterns, optical illusions, decontextualized images and ambiguous imaginaries that lead toward the creation of a new dimension. The strong familiarity of this with actual reality will destabilize the viewer, throwing him in a confused state of deja vu’. Solid bold lines, illusive interiors, surrealistic figures, hypnotic arrangements, thick brushstrokes, subconscious revelations and visual puzzling, will channel their energy into a clean and dreamy form that affects the whole environment, able to immerse the spectator into a dreamlike atmosphere.

 

Painting by Joseph Lee

THIS VALENTINE’S DAY, MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERIES CELEBRATES LOVE!

*Featured art by Marc Chagall, Lovers in Grey (Jacques Lassaigne, m.194) 1957 Lithograph

Love is in the air this February at Martin Lawrence Galleries (MLG). All nine of its fine art locations (Soho, San Francisco, Las Vegas, La Jolla, New Orleans, Maui, Orange County, Schaumburg, Dallas) will be offering veteran and first-time collectors alike original and unique paintings, drawings, sculpture and limited-edition graphics from over 40 of the world’s most renowned 20th and 21st-century artists.

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, MLG unveils works by Marc Chagall, Robert Indiana and André Masson, Among others. No expression of love is more eternal than a work of fine art.

“In our life, there is a single color, as on an artist’s palette, which provides the meaning of life and art. It is the color of love”. Marc Chagall

Marc Chagall (1887-1985) was born in Vitsyebsk, Belarus and his artistic view of romance and intrigue greets us in the captivating Chagall Les Amourex en Gris (Lovers in Grey), (Jacques Lassaigne, M.194)1957. Black strokes of the night envelope two lovers illuminated by the bath of light floating from the moon. With beautiful spots of bright colors masterfully placed about, the composition is light and fluid with a sense of movement and peace. The lovers touch their foreheads tenderly and gaze at one another though a grace and attitude that is purely and powerfully Chagall. This beautiful testament to the bond of love must be viewed to be fully appreciated

Honored for his distinct style and pioneering role, Marc Chagall painted dream-like subjects rooted in personal history and Eastern European folklore. He worked in several mediums, including painting, printmaking, and book illustration, and his stained-glass windows can be seen in New York, France, and Jerusalem. Chagall emigrated to Paris in 1910 and began experimenting with Cubism, befriending painters Robert Delaunay and Fernand Léger. Chagall’s style has been described as a hybrid of Cubism, Fauvism, and Symbolism, and his supernatural subjects are thought to have significantly influenced the Surrealists. Though he actively engaged in the Parisian artistic community, art for Chagall was first and foremost a means of personal expression. He rightfully viewed his imagery and allegory as uniquely his own.

“It would be my intention that everybody should have love, and there are a lot of people in the world.” Robert Indiana

Robert Indiana (1928-2018) was an American Pop artist whose work drew inspiration from signs, billboards, and commercial logos. He is best known for his series of LOVE paintings, which employed bold and colorful letterforms to spell out the word “love.” “Oddly enough, I wasn’t thinking at all about anticipating the love generation and hippies,” he once explained. “It was a spiritual concept. It isn’t a sculpture of love any longer. It’s become the very theme of love itself.” Born Robert Earl Clark on September 13, 1928, in New Castle, IN, he adopted the name of his home state after serving in the US military. Indiana went on to receive his BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1954. His work grew in popularity over the decades, with both his LOVE and HOPE motifs transformed into numerous public sculptures. In September 2013, the Whitney Museum of American Art proudly exhibited “Robert Indiana: Beyond LOVE,” the artist’s first retrospective in New York.

The ‘Book of Love’ project was conceived by Robert Indiana as a portfolio of prints and corresponding poems that would make a definitive statement on his masterpiece LOVE, fulfilling his original vision as both a poet and a painter. Each poem has a highly raised embossment of LOVE, trapped in colors, just below the title, each poem hand pencil initialed by the artist.

Today, his works are held in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Tate Gallery in London, and the National Gallery in Washington, D.C., among others. MLG is extremely proud to offer them to collectors.

André Masson (1896-28 October 1987) was born in Balagny-sur-Thérain, a town just north of Paris. A childhood spent close to nature made a lasting impression on Masson, and he drew inspiration from life and landscape imagery throughout his career. At age 11 he enrolled in the Académie Royale des beaux-arts and the École des arts décoratifs in Brussels, where he studied with the Symbolist painter Constant Montald. He first encountered modern art through the work of James Ensor before learning about the ideas of the Futurists and Cubists. At age 16, he was awarded the Grand Prix de l’Académie for painting. While in Paris, he became interested in Nicolas Poussin’s representations of mythological themes, subjects that he would later treat in his work.

During the early 1920s in Paris, Masson joined the new Surrealist group after one of his paintings had attracted the attention of the movement’s leader, André Breton. Masson soon became the foremost practitioner of automatic writing, which, when applied to drawing, was a form of a spontaneous composition intended to express impulses and images arising directly from the unconscious. Hi paintings and drawings from the late 1920s and the ’30s are turbulent, suggestive renderings of scenes of violence, eroticism, and

physical metamorphosis. A natural draftsman, he used curved, expressive lines to delineate biomorphic forms that border on the abstract.

Also included in MLG’s celebration of love are hand-signed serigraphs by Erté, the father of Art Deco, original paintings by Robert Deyber, whose works offer unique visual interpretations of clichés, euphemisms and idioms and Brad Faine, an internationally recognized artist and printmaker.

Please visit any of Martin Lawrence Galleries nine locations across North America, or visit them online at martinlawrence.com

André Masson, 360 MAGAZINE

Andre Masson, Pyramus und Thisebe (Les Ammanns Celebrex) hand-signed etching with acquaint, 15 x 18 inches.

MATRIX 181 × WADSWORTH ATHENEUM

MATRIX 181 at the Wadsworth Atheneum Features the paintings of 

Emily Mae Smith

MATRIX, the Wadsworth Atheneum’s groundbreaking contemporary exhibition series, has set some new goals. Upcoming projects will embrace experimental art, performance art, and explore new developments in painting. In looking at contemporary painting the Wadsworth found a unique vision in the work of Emily Mae Smith. The exhibition marks the first MATRIX show since 2013 to feature an artist who is solely a painter. For her MATRIX project, Smith engages with a masterpiece from the Wadsworth’s permanent collection: William Holman Hunt’s The Lady of Shalott (c. 1888–1905). Emily Mae Smith / MATRIX 181 will be on view February 7 through May 5, 2019.

 

Smith was chosen by Artsy as 1 of 20 female artists pushing figurative painting forward. With a nod to distinct painting movements from the history of art, such as Symbolism, Surrealism, and Pop art, Smith creates lively compositions that offer sly social and political commentary. Teeming with symbols, Hunt’s The Lady of Shalott (below) is the catalyst for this project, in which Smith provides a feminist reimagining of the narrative. For MATRIX 181, her first solo museum exhibition in the United States, Smith has selected seven paintings, dated 2015 to 2018, that relate to The Lady of Shalott, and created three new paintings, dated 2019, directly inspired by Hunt’s masterwork. 

In The Lady of Shalott Smith finds a familiar image, she’s had a postcard of the painting since she was a teenager. It became the perfect source to address the outdated psychology of female oppression, male authority, and implied violence, still pertinent today.

 

There is an uncanny affinity between the coded iconography of Smith and Hunt. According to Patricia Hickson, the Wadsworth’s Emily Hall Tremaine Curator of Contemporary Art, “Emily Mae Smith offers a raucous and empowering retelling of The Lady of Shalott, leading with her eccentric broomstick avatar along with her usual toolbox of gendered symbols. She employs a refreshing, satirical approach to social commentary.”

 

Smith’s lexicon of signs and symbols begins with her avatar, inspired by the broomstick figure from Disney’s Fantasia (1940). Simultaneously referring to a painter’s brush, a domestic tool associated with women’s work, and the phallus, the figure continually transforms across Smith’s body of work. “The first broom I put in a painting was…a way for me to paint an object, figure, female, and phallus all at the same time. I thought it was funny and an ideal vehicle,” said Smith. “The ideas for my broom figure have changed and expanded since then; it has been molded to my painting needs. You can say more difficult things with a character.” Smith’s depiction of the female body is all visual wit and dark humor. By adopting a variety of guises, the broom and other symbols speak to contemporary subjects, including gender, sexuality, capitalism, and violence.

 

Artist Biography

Emily Mae Smith was born in 1979 in Austin Texas. She currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. She received her M.F.A. in Visual Art from Columbia University, New York in 2006 and her B. F. A. in Studio Art from the University of Texas at Austin. Recent solo and dual exhibitions include: Emily Mae Smith, Le Consortium, Lyon, France (2018-19); A Strange Relative, Perrotin, New York, NY (2018); The Sphinx or The Caress, Simone Subal Gallery, New York, NY (2017); Tesla Girls, Rodolphe Janssen, Brussels, Belgium (2016); Honest Espionage, Mary Mary, Glasgow, Scotland, UK (2016); Medusa, Laurel Gitlen, New York, NY (2015). Select group exhibitions include Summer, curated by Ugo Rondinone, Peter Freeman Inc., New York, NY (2018);Pine Barrens, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, NY (2018); Pharmacy for Idiots, Rob Tufnell and Tanya Leighton, Köln, Germany (2017); Women to the Front, Works from the Miller Meigs Collection, Lumber Room, Portland, OR (2017); Le Quatrième Sexe, curated by Marie Maertens, Le Coeur, Paris, France (2017); Scarlet Street, Lucien Terras. New York, NY (2016); Me, Myself, I, China Art Objects Galleries, Los Angeles, CA (2016); Surrreal, KoĴnig Galerie (St. Agnes), Berlin, Germany (2016); Untitled Body Parts, Simone Subal Gallery, New York, NY (2016).

Related Programs

February 7, Art After Dark: Color My World, 5-8pm

Celebrate the opening of Emily Mae Smith / MATRIX 181.  The evening includes an artist talk by Emily Mae Smith at 6pm, live music, free food, beer tasting, cash bar, watercolor workshop, and film. $10; $5 members.

 

March 9, Encounters: Emily Mae Smith and #MeToo, 10am

Join a dialogue that explores artistic responses to gender, sexuality, capitalism, and violence in the work of MATRIX artist Emily Mae Smith alongside the powerful, contemporary #metoo movement, which brings to light sexual harassment and sexual assault. Free, but RSVP to faculty@wadsworthatheneum.org to reserve a seat and lunch.

 

March 21, Gallery Talk: Emily Mae Smith / MATRIX 181, Noon

Curator Patricia Hickson leads a tour of MATRIX 181 discussing painter Emily Mae Smith’s flat, graphic imagery that visualizes issues like gender inequality, capitalism, and violence. Free with museum admission.

 

About MATRIX

Inaugurated in 1975, MATRIX is the Wadsworth’s groundbreaking contemporary art exhibition series featuring works by artists from around the world. From its inception, MATRIX has been a forum for art that is challenging, current, and sometimes controversial. Through clear explanation and thoughtful engagement with the viewer, MATRIX exhibitions call into question preconceptions about art and increase understanding of its possibilities. Many MATRIX artists, such as Christo, Sol LeWitt, Gerhard Richter, Cindy Sherman, Andy Warhol, and Carrie Mae Weems are now considered seminal figures in contemporary art.

 

Exhibition and Program Support

The MATRIX program is generously supported by the Wadsworth Atheneum’s Contemporary Coalition. Public programs at the Wadsworth Atheneum are supported by the Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation Fund. Sustaining support for the Wadsworth Atheneum provided by Newman’s Own Foundation and the Greater Hartford Arts Council’s United Arts Campaign.

 

About the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art

Founded in 1842, the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art is the oldest continuously operating public art museum in the United States. The museum’s nearly 50,000 works of art span 5,000 years, from Greek and Roman antiquities to the first museum collection of American contemporary art. The Wadsworth Atheneum’s five connected buildings-representing architectural styles from Gothic Revival to modern International Style-are located at 600 Main Street in Hartford, Conn. Hours: Wednesday-Friday: 11am-5pm; Saturday and Sunday: 10am-5pm Admission: $5-15; discounts for members, students and seniors. Free admission for Hartford residents with Wadsworth Welcome registration. Free “happy hour” admission 4-5pm. (860) 278-2670. thewadsworth.org.

 

Images:

Emily Mae Smith images courtesy of the artist and Simone Subal Gallery, New York. Left: Emily Mae Smith, The Drawing Room, 2018, Oil on linen. Private collection. Photo by Dario Lasagni. Center: Emily Mae Smith, Still Life, 2015, Oil on linen. Private collection. Photo by Charles Benton. Right: Emily Mae Smith, Unruly Thread, 2019, Oil on linen. Photo by Charles Benton.

 

William Holman Hunt, The Lady of Shalott, c. 1888-1905. Oil on canvas. The Ella Gallup Sumner and Mary Catlin Sumner Collection Fund. 1961.470

 

 

“YOUNG THUG AS PAINTINGS” EXHIBIT

During Miami Art Basel, Young Thug is teaming up with Netherlands-based artist, Hajar Benjida for their SCOPE Miami Beach installation, “Young Thug As Paintings,” an iteration that Benjida originated on Instagram (@YoungThugAsPaintings).
Originally a school project, Benjida’s “Young Thug As Paintings” pays homage to the cultural capital of Thug, by juxtaposing him with some of history’s most revered works of art. Each combination offers a glimpse into Young Thug’s fluid sense of style and musicality. “I jokingly answered an interview question with “I hope to discuss renaissance paintings with Thug someday.” 1.5 years later and I’m bringing my project to life together with Young Thug himself,” stated Benjida.
The exhibit will be available for viewing December 4th through December 9th at the 18th Annual SCOPE Miami Beach Art Fair. SCOPE is one of the most important satellite art fairs that takes place during Miami Art Basel. The exhibit is sponsored by Young Stoner Life Records and 300 Entertainment. “Young Thug is one of the most profound artists of this generation and we’re going to continue to celebrate him in the most innovative ways. Hajar Benjida’s display of Thug’s influence through art disruption is incredible. This is also a celebration of Hajar’s talent and her appreciation of the culture,” says Rayna Bass, Head of Cultural Marketing at 300 Entertainment.
Thug’s exhibit comes shortly after the release of his latest EP, On the Rvn, which featured surprise appearances from Elton John, Jaden Smith, 6lack, and Offset.
Check out his INSTAGRAM HERE

Rare Glimpse of Tennessee Williams Paintings

At the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU in Miami Beach

On view now through October 7th

From the Collection of David Wolkowsky,

Scion of Pioneer Jewish Family that Settled Key West in the 1800s and Contributed to the History

of Jews in the State Florida

Long known as “Mr. Key West,” David Wolkowsky, the famed scion of Florida’s pioneer Jewish family that helped to settle Key West in the 1800s, has loaned his paintings by close friend Tennessee Williams to the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU for their premiere in Miami Beach.

This is one of the few times they have been exhibited outside of Key West. The exhibition Tennessee Williams: Playwright and Painter is an intimate showing of nine exquisitely rare paintings by one of America’s greatest playwrights, created by Williams in Key West during the 1970s. One of his closest friends was David Wolkowsky, the Key West developer who owned a private island called Ballast Key (nine miles from Key West), and the Pier House Resort.

Both idyllic locations were the scene of many glamorous gatherings hosted by David and Tennessee, including parties for Hollywood luminaries, heads of state, and society’s crème-de-la-crème.

If these paintings could talk, oh the stories they’d tell . . .

Subject matter includes the writer’s famous cohorts during the 1970s in Key West (including a portrait of a very young Michael York), and personifications from Williams’ own poetry, short stories, and characters from his plays.

Billie Holiday songs played in the background while Williams captured different images on his canvas.

Some of the paintings by Williams feature gay themes. An “open secret” throughout his fabled career, the playwright struggled with societal prejudices from a young age, and the taboos surrounding homosexuality during his lifetime manifested in a number of Williams’ paintings.

His artwork remains widely popular among collectors, most of these sought-after paintings from the last years of his life are in private hands and rarely seen.

These precious gems are the pride of the Key West Art & Historical Society, and the Miami Beach exhibition (on view through October 7 at the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU) is an uncommon opportunity to see in person how Williams expressed through painting his feelings about sexuality, loneliness and being gay.

Most of these sought-after paintings from the last years of his life are in private hands and rarely seen.

David Wolkowsky, who still lives in Key West and is almost 100, is from one of the earliest Jewish Families of Florida, and their history is documented as part of the Jewish Museum of Florida’s permanent collection about the history of Jews in the State of Florida. Wolkowsky is revered as a Key West original with a “campy sense of style, whose name every local knows.”

Williams was often found at Wolkowsky’s private, celeb-drenched affairs. Guests included the likes of Truman Capote, British Prime Minister Edward Heath, and members of the Rockefeller, Vanderbilt and Mellon families. According to Key West lore, Wolkowsky was notorious for serving plain hot dogs, white wine and potato chips to his famous guests, while Tennessee painted and drank red wine.

“The story behind these paintings, and the close friendship between Wolkowsky and Williams, is just one example of the many unexpected treasures in the rich history of Jewish culture in the State of Florida, spanning four centuries,” said Susan Gladstone, the Executive Director of the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU.

“The fact that Williams painted, much less that he painted in Key West, is a surprise to many and his paintings have mostly remained outside of the public eye. We are honored to have these works here at the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, and to be one of the few museums that David Wolkowsky has selected to exhibit these works outside of their Key West home,” adds Gladstone.

Read more about the life of David Wolkowsky and his contributions to the history of Florida, in “This Man Is An Island,” written by Michael Adno – bittersoutherner.com/this-man-is-an-island-david-wolkowsky-key-west/

More about Tennessee Williams:

Tennessee Williams’ plays during the 1940s and 1950s were innovative, confrontational, and presented audiences with controversial subject matter such as deep, dark family secrets, Southern Gothic themes, and other taboos that had never been seen on the stage before.

His Southern dramas, The Glass Menagerie, A Street Car Named Desire and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof were blockbusters that were adapted into iconic films.

Williams single-handedly introduced Marlon Brando to the American theater, and some of his other leading stars included Vivien Leigh, Elizabeth Taylor, Paul Newman, Tallulah Bankhead and Bette Davis.

For more than 30 years, Williams lived part-time and wrote in a small cottage on Duncan Street in Key West, and took up oil painting in the 1960s. On his patio, he would sketch friends, acquaintances, various literary characters and authors. Guests would often visit his home on Duncan street and purchase his recently created paintings.

By the beginning of the 1960s, American theater shifted, and Williams’ new plays were not as popular. In 1963, his lifetime partner Frank Merlo died of lung cancer in Key West. The years following Merlo’s death were difficult for Williams although he continued to write until his own death in 1983. His literary career includes plays, short stories and novels. As a writer, Williams was persistent and tireless. His later plays strove towards innovation and bold experimentation and continue to be revived and performed today.

Like most writers, William’s life was fraught with hardships and struggles.

Upon viewing these paintings, it is clear that painting provided solace and refuge for one of America’s most celebrated playwrights.

In this exhibition, Williams pays homage to his own literary works (including his first novel, The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone), writers he admired (Jean Genet, Arthur Rimbaud and Wallace Stevens), and a portrait of a very young Michael York, who starred in the 1973 production of Williams’ Out Cry. Of significance is the fact these works were created during the 1970s, a progressive era for artists, activists, and forward thinking, with the notion of liberation being key.

These rare paintings now on view in Miami Beach at the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU through October 7 capture the essence of a strong and independent artist living in a particular time and place.

MIAMI DESIGN DISTRICT x MUSEUM GARAGE

The Miami Design District, a neighborhood dedicated to innovative art, design and architecture, is set to debut the most recent addition to the area’s latest phase of development, the highly anticipated Museum Garage. Featuring the work of five world-class architects, the seven-story mixed-use structure will house ground-floor retail spaces and maintain the capacity for 800 vehicles.

Miami Design District developer and CEO of Dacra, Craig Robins, along with L Catterton Real estate commissioned architect and curator Terence Riley to develop the concept of this project. In doing so, Riley curated the work of various participating international architects: WORKac, J. Mayer H., Clavel Arquitectos, Nicolas Buffe and Riley’s own architectural firm K/R (Keenen/Riley).

ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE

Critically acclaimed exhibition ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE returns this April with a benefit auction hosted by ARTSY. Celebrate art for activism with works by more than 65 emerging and mid-career artists including Ann Lewis, Grace Graupe-Pillard, Rebecca Leveille, Michelle Pred, Indira Cesarine, Signe Pierce and Parker Day, among many others. Every work sold goes toward supporting the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and its mission to defend and preserve the rights and liberties guaranteed by the constitution of the United States. 

The ARTSY benefit auction features artwork across all mediums addressing the issues our society has been confronted with such as immigration rights, health care, reproductive rights, climate change, transgender rights, white supremacy, gender equality, gun control and more. It will additionally feature many new works by artists of the ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE exhibition.

Bidding opened today at 12 noon and will close on April 19th at 5pm! Head over now to bid and help raise funds for the ALCU. 

ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE BENEFIT AUCTION ARTISTS: 

Alexandra Rubinstein, Alyson Provax, Ann Lewis, Anna Rindos, Annika Connor, Anya Rubin, Bradford Scott Stringfield, Cabell Molina, Camilla Marie Dahl, Danielle Siegelbaum, Daryl Daniels, Desdemonda Dallas, Desire Moheb Zandi, Dessie Jackson, Diana Casanova, Dolly Faibyshev, Domenica Bucalo, Eleni Giannopoulou, Elisa Garcia de la Huerta, Elise Vazelakis, Erin Victoria Axtell, Fahren Feingold, Gabriela Handal, Grace Graupe Pillard, Hannah Stahl, Indira Cesarine, James Hsieh, Jamia Weir, Jamie Martinez, Jen Dwyer, Joanne Leah, Joel Tretin,Kate Hush, Katya Kan, Kristin Malin, Kristin O’Connor, Leah Schrager, Leslie Kerby, Leslie Sheryll, Lola Jiblazee, Lola Ogbara, Manju Shandler, Marne Lucas, Mary Tooley Parker, Michael Reece, Michele Pred, Miss Meatface, Nichole Washington, Olga Filippova, Olive Allen, Panteha Abareshi, Parker Day, Rada Yakova, Rebecca Leveille, Rosary Solimanto, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Rute Ventura, Sarah Dillon, Signe Pierce, Stephanie Hanes, Tatana Kellner, Tommy Mitchell, Touba Alipour, Valerie Carmet, Valery Estabrook, Vanessa Teran, Yuri Murphy

VIEW AUCTION CATALOGUE

BID NOW ON ARTWORKS

 

 SELECT PRESS ON
“ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE”

Vogue 
“The Untitled Space Gallery Checks In With Nasty Women, One Year Later

CNN
“Artists mark Trump’s inauguration anniversary with day of protest art”

The Guardian
“One Year of Resistance: the exhibit chronicling the year in anti-Trump art” 

INTERVIEW
“What One Year Of Resistance Looks Like In The Art World”

New York Daily News
“Trump’s America reflected in ‘One Year of Resistance’ art show” 

Good Trouble
“White Lies: One Year of Resistance”

Metro News
“80+ artists commemorate ‘One Year of Resistance’” 

 

 

“impulses, restraints, tones”

“impulses, restraints, tones” New Compositions by Hannah Quinlivan

Opening Reception: March 1, 2018, 6-8pm
Exhibition Dates: March 1 – April 20, 2018

February 16, 2018 (New York, NY) – JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present impulses, restraints, tones an exhibition by Australian contemporary artist, Hannah Quinlivan. impulses, restraints, tones is the artist’s first exhibition in New York and will be on view from March 1 – April 20, 2018 with an opening reception on March 1 from 6-8pm.

Best known for her work within the movement of experimental drawing, Quinlivan expands upon the medium to create drawings that employ wire, steel, salt, yarn, shadow, and LED light, constantly evolving and dissecting the elements of a drawing to investigate the confines of the line itself. Twisted wire structures are the basis for her shadow drawings, which Quinlivan later develops further into sculptures; 2D drawings turn into 3D drawings, that are then turned back into 2D drawings. With a deep commitment to the exploration of and innate response to her materials, Quinlivan composes lyrical artworks that stitch together a response to the passing of time. Each element of the work is endlessly translated into an infinite looping web; traveling through our consciousness and drawing attention to the subjectivity of the phenomena of recollection and forgetting.

impulses, restraints, tones exhibits brand new “Spatial Drawings,” as well as two delicate, yet powerful, site-specific and interactive installations that respond to the gallery space and flux of bodies within it. The well-known “Spatial Drawings” walk the line between sculptural weaving and graphic mark making and explores concepts of temporal reality and memory. Quinlivan’s “Spatial Drawings” performance develops from wire armatures suspended from the ceiling. The shadows of these wire armatures are the basis for Quinlivan’s live and in-person crystalline salt drawings that will be developed over the course of three weeks during exhibition.

This work, shown for the first time in New York City, forms part of a series of site-specific ephemeral drawings Quinlivan has been making in Cambridge, Berlin, Hong Kong, Australia, and Colorado from since 2016.

Curator Marguerite Brown, explains “Linear threads and their manipulation have for millennia been symbolically connected to notions of time. The Moirai of ancient Greek mythology, also known at the Fates, were three goddesses who through the act of spinning thread with distaff and spindle, controlled the life of every person from birth to death, when their thread was abruptly cut. Similar female deities exist in Roman, Norse and Slavic mythologies, where thread is consistently wielded as a manifestation of destiny. As such, a simple strand and the way it is stretched, allotted and truncated, became an ancient way of comprehending the movement of a human life through time.”

ABOUT HANNAH QUINLIVAN
Hannah Quinlivan, named by BMA Magazine as one of the Six Canberra Artists to watch in 2018, was a finalist for the 2014 Alice Prize and has received such prestigious accolades as the Canberra Critic Circle Award, Shire of East Pilbara Residency Award, Cox Prize, Don Moffat & Cecilia Ng award, People’s Choice Award, Megalo Print Studio and Gallery Residency Award, and the Jan Brown Drawing Prize. She has exhibited major presentations at Canberra Museum and Art Gallery, Canberra; National Portrait Gallery, Canberra; Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Cambridge University, London, Pembroke College, Cambridge; Deakin University, Melbourne; The Hong Kong Harbourfront, Hong Kong; and Kuala Lumpur Biennale, National Art Gallery of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. She is in such prestigious public collections as National Gallery of Australia, Gregory Allicar Museum, The Australian High Commission (Singapore), Philip Cox Collection, Deakin University, The Australian National University, KPMG Art Collection, Gaw Capital collection, Colorado State University, Megalo Print Studio + Gallery, Shire of East Pilbara, Ormond College Collection. She was recently selected by the curators of Urban Art Projects to create a major public art commission where her work will be featured on the glazed screen of every platform of the Canberra Light Rail network.

ABOUT JanKossen
JanKossen Contemporary, founded in 2009 by Dr Jasmin Kossenjans, is an international dealer of contemporary art representing artists working across disciplines. Its principal focus is the representation of an international group of contemporary artists whose diverse practices include painting, drawing, sculpture, video, large scale installation, and performance. Aside from its represented artists, the gallery collaborates directly on exhibitions and projects with other artists and guest curators. The gallery is committed to presenting its artists’ work in an international context and to firmly establishing their contributions to the cannon of art history. Gallery artists are in the collections of, and have been part of exhibitions at, many museums around the world. Their works have been widely published as artist monographs, in art journals, and among critical theory texts. The gallery operates in Basel, Switzerland; Venice, Italy; New York, NY; and will open a new exhibition space in Hong Kong in 2019.

Related Events
Opening Reception
March 1, 2018
6-8pm

Daily Performances
March 1 – 17, 2018
1-3pm

Artist Talk and Final Performance
March 17, 2018
6-8pm

Location
JanKossen Contemporary
529 W 20th Street, 7th floor, 7W
New York, New York 10011

Gallery Contact
Karen Gilbert
Karen.gilbert@jankossen.com

Media Contact
Lainya Magaña, A&O PR
347 395 4155
lainya@aopublic.com

Exhibition A × NADA Miami 2017

Exhibition A is pleased to announce its Cultural Partnership with NADA Miami 2017.

We are collaborating directly with Shara Hughes to launch a new print edition exclusive to NADA Miami 2017; a series of which will be enhanced by a hand-painted component that will draw on Hughes’ larger painting practice.

Hughes’ paintings offer glimpses into psychedelic landscapes and otherworldly portals; layered compositions that reveal as much as they conceal. Inspired by her purposeful painterly framing of her landscapes, we’ve collaborate with Hughes to release a series of fifteen painted frames to encase her new print edition, resulting in a sculptural realization of Hughes’ work.

Photography: Jason Schmidt

By collaborating directly with top contemporary artists to publish limited edition artworks sold for a fraction of gallery prices, Exhibition A broadens the world of contemporary art collecting. Acting as NADA’s Cultural Partner, we underscore our shared mission to provide collectors, artists, curators, gallerists, and the general public with alternative modes of distribution.

Exhibition A at NADA Miami

Booth 9.08

Ice Palace Studios

59 NW 14th St

Miami, FL 33136

For more information, please contact info@exhibitiona.com.

VIP Preview by Invitation

Thursday, December 7, 10am–12pm

Opening Preview by Invitation

Thursday, December 7, 12–2pm

Open to the Public

Thursday, December 7; 2–7pm

Friday, December 8; 11am–7pm

Saturday, December 9; 11am–7pm

Sunday, December 10; 11am–5pm

Rilke Guillén

Rilke Guillén 

Artist Plásticomexicanocatalán, spiritually and vitally grown and split between two ways of being, of thinking and feeling. He has exhibited his work in Spain and Mexico for many decades. 

Artist statement

I believe to express my vision of this splendor-decadent world that witnesses our existence, to try to move in the emotion of the viewer, to make him see inside yes; by the right and the reverse of the same glove of what is and exists and of what is not and also exists. Like the dream inside the eye and the outside eye. Like the truth and vertigo of the depth of the fractal-cosmic spiral. As a picture, as truth, as the line that springs from my pen. Creating images and sculptures gives meaning to my existence and being me from the inside-out, so I can communicate with others. I am an insatiable explorer of the plastic techniques that I am encountering in my path, such as painting, watercolor, engraving, sculpture, design, etc. My search in these different lands has the same objective: to find the voice that is capable of taking out this animal-human being, who is thronging in my heart. The fine perfume of the flower of my spirit.

Biography 

I remember as a child drawing horses and birds obsessively. The representation of images has always seemed to me as a matter that holds great power, as if in representing an object or being, somehow one was made with his skill, with his unique quality. I have always been surrounded by art. My father, in his poetic dimension, attracted artists from all disciplines to the house to share his presence and talent, some of them had a great impact on me. There was a very special one that made me the honor of taking me as a disciple for a short but unforgettable time: The great teacher Rodolfo Zanabria (who in peace rides in infinity with his maidens with long hair and beautiful faces). From him, I learned that the road is long and if you know how to walk you will reach the Magical Domain. Destiny had the willingness to be a Mexican-Catalan artist, spiritually and vitally grown and split between two ways of being, thinking and feeling. This has allowed me to exhibit and share my work on both sides of the Atlantic since my debut on the plastic scene, until today. 

For more artworks, visit here