Posts tagged with "painter"

Alexander Mijares, Sunreef Yatchts, wynwood, 360 MAGAZINE, Miami, 360, art, design

Sunreef Yachts × Alexander Mijares

Sunreef Yachts celebrated their collaboration with Miami-based artist Alexander Mijares at Mijares Gallery in Wynwood with a cocktail party followed by a private champagne cruise on the wrapped $3.2 million dollar 70 foot Marquis in Brickell Bay. Sunreef Yachts, the world’s leading designer and manufacturer of luxury sailing and power multihulls, was showcased at the Fontainebleau Marina with Mijares’ “Pieces of Me” wrapped around the hull of the 70’ Sunreef Power catamaran from Wednesday, December 4th to Sunday, December 8th. This legendary and custom-made model is designed in detail for the most demanding customers and delivers the best in comfort, style and safety. She boasts luxurious accommodations, vast living spaces, extravagant and innovative design features. This sounds similar to services like bvi yacht charters.
 
“Pieces of me is a painting inspired by feeling protected, as if a guardian angel is with me along my journey” says Mijares. .
 
Miami-born and internationally acclaimed artist Alexander Mijares brings a colorful perspective and injects new life into the art world with his myriad of vibrant works. As a self-taught artist, Mijares finds inspiration in the dynamic energy of both his city of Miami and his Cuban and Spanish roots and creates pieces that are rich in culture. His vision has been recognized both nationally and internationally by some of the most discerning art collectors across the globe. Both Forbes and Elite Daily named Mijares “One of the Top 10 Most Influential Artists” in the US. Mijares has also found inspiration in music; the rising artist collaborated with Pitbull in 2014 during the World Cup, painted the iHeart Radio Station Studio and has created custom pieces for artists like Justin Bieber, Tori Kelly, Pharrell, and Alejandro Sanz; to name a few.

*Photo courtesy of Between Two Yetis

five iron golf, painting, interior decor, nyc, 360 MAGAZINE

Why a Painting Is the Perfect Gift

For most of us, giving a present to a loved one means given the latest, expensive gadget because it goes to show the depth of our love for them. But do gadgets really express timeless love? Not in our opinion. For gifting something that would express your timeless love and commitment and how much you cherish your bond, paintings make it to the top of the list. You may wonder why a painting is the perfect gift. Well there are plenty of reasons why paintings are valuable gifts and here are some of them. 

Paintings last lifelong and hold more emotional value. But in addition to these, there are more reasons why paintings make a better choice.

Timelessness

When buying a present, most people wish to give something that will last lifelong. However, when items like gadgets, perfumes or such are given they last only for a short while and the essence of the gift disappears just as soon as the product becomes unusable. Even if it is something as expensive as an iphone it will certainly not last more than 3 years. 

Paintings on the other hand are priceless treasures whose value does not diminish with the passing of time. Of course new paintings are introduced in the art market regularly but that does not take away the value of the old ones even slightly. A painting becomes a steady and a permanent part of your life and its presence is something one never ceases to enjoy. 

Hence, if you’re looking for something that will forever remind your loved one about you and retain its value for years then a painting is truly the perfect choice for a gift.

Art Evokes Emotions

Gift items such as perfumes, gadgets, food items rarely evoke any emotions. Yes, they do make a person happy for that feeling does not last for a very long time. As long as a commodity is new and popular in the market, it gives a feeling of satisfaction to its owners, but once something better replaces it in the market, the value of it also diminishes in the eyes of the owner. The interest in using it is also thus lost. They also lose their place of honor in the lives of the people they are gifted to.

However, where paintings are concerned, people relate to them in their own individual ways. Often times, people can feel the emotions portrayed in paintings flowing through them. This is the primary reasons why paintings can make a perfect gift choice for someone. It is a great medium of expressing emotions.

Easy Maintenance and Eco-Friendly

Most other gift items are mode out of materials that cause great damage and harm to the nature. Look at gadgets for example. Not only do gadgets have to be handled with extraordinary care they also come with certainty of failure in future. Can one mobile phone function all of a person’s life? Most definitely not.

Paintings on the contrary require very little care by the owner. They can remain intact while being hung on the walls for years and still not lose their beauty. The only maintenance they require once in a while is for the dust to be wiped off. It really is that simple, eco-friendly and completely low on maintenance. 

Paintings Improve the Quality of Life

If the word of art lovers can’t convince you then science most certainly would. Art, as proved by science researches, promotes the quality of life and makes a person feel good emotionally and mentally.

A neurobiologist, Professor Semir Zaki from the University College of London says that when a person stares at an artwork, its effect is to stimulate the part of the brain the same way when falling in love does. The brain releases dopamine, which is a feel-good chemical when one falls romantically for another. In this process, feelings of affection and attachment are evoked which are quite pleasurable.

The same pleasurable feelings are evoked when a person closely observes great artworks. Artworks by Constable, Turner and Monet and masterpieces like Sandro Botticelli’s ‘The Birth of Venus’, are like therapy for the minds. 

Paintings also often motivate a person to positively change their ways of life. There are several paintings which portray moral ideas such as the painting of a Hindu Lord Krishna, uplifting and teaching a depressed Arjuna. Such paintings inspire the good in people and if your gift can do something similar for your beloved, how great it would be.

Paintings Also Have Affordable Options

It is true that original paintings usually require huge chunks of cash. But why not settle for the alternatives? It is after all the thought that counts, not the money spent that matters. Most other gift items do not come with affordable alternatives. If it is an expensive gadget you decide upon but don’t have the resources for, what would be your alternative? Possibly something that is cloned or a lower end version. 

This does not happen with paintings. There are multiple options suiting every budget range. You can settle for canvas prints, reproductions or posters. These alternatives only cost a fraction of the originals but do no compromise on any qualities which the originals offer except perhaps only the monetary appreciation of an original. But gifting your beloved a painting, you gift them a treasure that will last them a lifetime. What could be better than that?

Art is Treasure

With the passage of time, what is valuable today will become trash tomorrow. Paintings however, never become trash. They have their own way of becoming a person’s most valuable treasure which only increases in importance as the years advance. Any original but ordinary painting bought today can turn into tomorrow’s most priceless possessions, which rarely happens with any other item. 

One only needs to take a look around the art history for evidence. The most expensive and most sought after paintings today are the ones that were created centuries and decades ago. If you gift a painting to your beloved, you most likely give them a treasure for life.

Art is Personal

Gifts that hold personal value are even more special than the others. It is commonly believed that taste in art is considered personal. This works well when you want to gift something to someone you care deeply for. When you buy someone a painting suited to their tastes, you actually show them how well you understand their preferences, know what aligns well with their interests or reflect their vibrant personalities. This goes a long way in expressing the thought and effort you put in to make your loved feel special.

Camille Hannah, Olsen Gruin, art, design, 360 MAGAZINE, Australia

Camille Hannah

Olsen Gruin is pleased to present The Sixteen Pleasures, a solo exhibition by Australian artist Camille HannahThe Sixteen Pleasures will be on view at Olsen Gruin from October 9 – November 9, 2019. The exhibition design leads viewers with subtle intensity through a dynamic installation of variously scaled paintings and mirrors. During this journey, reflected glimpses of the self coalesce with Hannah’s paintings, creating spillage between the territories that define body and artwork. Enveloped and embraced within these abstract landscapes, viewers experience a bodily extension: a potent sensation which exceeds rational grasp.

By traversing this alluring amalgamation of imagery, the viewer becomes both witness and participant in the creation of these compelling ‘virtual’ paintings. These seductive, enigmatic images of desire echo the artist’s ongoing explorations around the expansive, unbounded nature of female desire and of the carnal disruption inherent to perceptual experience in the digital realm.

The Sixteen Pleasures also evokes the sensory experience of film, video and the mesmerizing back-lit screens that saturate our modern world. It is richly infused with the artist’s extensive enquiries into art history, philosophy, poetry, sexuality and contemporary culture, filtered through the personal narrative of each individual viewer. With this exhibition Hannah aims to create a boundless, all-encompassing landscape in which the viewer is captivated by an exhilarating and thought-provoking, physiological experience.

Camille Hannah attained a Masters of Fine Art by Research in 2013 and a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree in 2010, at the Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne, Australia where she was the recipient of an Australian Postgraduate Scholarship Award. In 2018 she won the Wyndham Art Prize, and in 2017 was selected as a finalist for the Arte Laguna Prize, Nappa Arsenale, Venice, Italy and as winner of the Special Exhibition Prize of a solo exhibition at Galerie Isabelle Lesmeister, Regensburg, Germany in 2018. In 2015 she was selected by an international jury to win the T.I.N.A. Art Prize, Maurizio Caldirola Arte Contemporanea, Milan, Italy, and was a finalist & winner of the People’s Choice Award in the Gold Coast Art Prize, Qld, Australia. Hannah was shortlisted in 2014 for Contemporary Visions V, Beers Contemporary Gallery, London, and in 2012 she won the Kozica-O’Callaghan Award for Painting. Other awards include the Premio Ora Art Prize, Italy 2013 International Catalogue and being shortlisted for the Arte Laguna Art Prize, Venice Arsenale, Italy and the Wynne Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, 2012.

Jeanette Hayes, The Untitled Space, 360 MAGAZINE

Jeanette Hayes

The Untitled Space
presents
 
(hot girl) summer featuring (hot girl) summer art by Jeanette Hayes
A SOLO EXHIBITION
Curated by Indira Cesarine

CLOSING RECEPTION
August 13th
6-8pm
THE UNTITLED SPACE
45 Lispenard Street 
NYC 10013

RSVP 
events@untitled-space.com

Jeanette Hayes (b. 1988) is a painter/multimedia artist based in New York. Originally from Chicago, Hayes moved to NYC and received a BFA from Pratt Institute. Her work addresses the traditional preservation of non-traditional technological and pop imagery through painting, video, digital manipulation, and Internet collages. Hayes’ interests include cultural phenomena and the confrontation of conventionality and subject matter. Her fascination with the amalgamation of images we each navigate through everyday and their correlations to civilization and ownership in 2019 has propelled her practice. With international solo shows in Sweden, Italy and Belgium, Hayes has also shown in New York Hayes at Half Gallery, the Hole, Regina Rex, Castor Gallery, Romeo, Bleecker Street Arts Club, the National Arts Club and more.

Most recently, Hayes was curated by the Culture Corps to create a public art installation at Hudson Yards, which is currently on view until November, 2019. Jeanette Hayes has made animated GIFs and videos for Proenza Schouler, CHANEL, Alexander Wang, Cynthia Rowley, Vogue and Opening Ceremony. She has received artist sponsorships from BlackBerry and Blick Art and was chosen by Purple magazine to create their artist book in 2016, which she titled “five”. Hayes has been featured in the New York Times, Vogue Japan, i-D, Complex Magazine, Interview Magazine, Dazed, the Coveteur, Purple Magazine, Paper Magazine, Playboy and TimeOut New York chose Hayes as one of the “5 most important new artists in New York City.” Jeanette Hayes lives and works in New York City.

Jarren frame, 360 MAGAZINE

Jarren Frame

New York artist, Jarren Frame, has made a mark in the art scene and is currently on display at world-renowned hotels and celeb hotspots such as Socialista, Sixty Hotel Soho, Mamo, Casa Malca, The Bowery Hotel, and Faena, alongside Damien Hirst’s iconic Golden Mammoth.  

Born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1990, Frame was inspired to step into the art world as a child from his grandfather, Philip Frame — a Sunday painter and founder of Frame Textiles Group (one time the largest blanket manufacturing business in the world). Philip would teach his grandson to paint flowers on weekends, igniting a spark leading him to pursue art full-time.

In October 2017, Frame displayed a series of James Bond-inspired works known as “The Playboy Paintings” during his first solo exhibition alongside photographer Peter Cary Peterson at The SIXTY SoHo Hotel. Following its success, he collaborated with Puerto Rican artist Jorge Zeno on “Zeno Gravity” on another Bond-inspired piece.

A rotating selection of artworks from his first collection titled “Bond, James Bond,” debuted in December 2017 at 77 Greene Street in New York. The series of 33 acrylic-on-wood pieces featured the recontextualization of vintage James Bond imagery over modern-day landscapes. The idea was born during a trip to Sardinia, where the 1977 classic film The Spy Who Loved Me was shot. ‘‘’Bond, James Bond’ was created on such an impulse. What I sought to do with those paintings was neutralize some of the shame around sex and masculinity. That’s really what those paintings are about: Fun, sex and champagne.”All 33 pieces sold out within a year, attracting a number of bold-face name buyers such as Chris Burch, Steve Wynn, Barron Hilton, former United States Secretary of Commerce Peter George Peterson, Alex Pall of The Chainsmokers, and hoteliers including Jason Pomeranc andJason Strauss.

Frame’s current collection, “Colors,” is another series of 33 paintings – this time acrylic-on-canvas and was inspired by the meaning we assign to colors and is meant to confront the viewer with the enormous diversity of choice we have. “‘Colors’ are a way of bottling up excitement and happiness that provide the power to inspire and uplift in addition to capturing and championing the spirit of individuality.”  The series premiered, for a limited-time at Socialista and Surf Lodge in July 2019.

JEANETTE HAYES

(hot girl) summer featuring (hot girl) summer art by Jeanette Hayes

A Solo Exhibition Curated by Indira Cesarine

OPENING RECEPTION: July 23rd

EXHIBITION ON VIEW: July 23th – August 13th

THE UNTITLED SPACE

45 Lispenard Street, NYC 10013

RSVP events@untitled-space.com

The Untitled Space is pleased to present solo exhibition, “(hot girl) summer featuring (hot girl) summer art by Jeanette Hayes”. Curated by gallery director Indira Cesarine, the exhibit will open on July 23rd, 2019, and be on view through August 13th, 2019. Jeanette Hayes is a multidisciplinary visual artist known for her collage-like aesthetic. Her works address pop culture imagery with an adventurous style, often juxtaposing high and popular culture with images of the female form that provoke stereotypes with a mischievous liberation. “(hot girl) summer featuring (hot girl) summer art by Jeanette Hayes,” a title inspired by HOT GIRL MEG, explores a playful and light-hearted mentality about summertime through a series of graphite on paper drawings and oil paintings. Featuring conglomerated collages with iconic images spanning from Frida Kahlo to Minnie Mouse, each work speaks to her vision of a “hot girl summer.” 

Hayes stated of the exhibition theme, “With everyone currently entrenched in daunting political times, I decided to delve into a body of work that would be amusing and could give the viewer a break from real life. These fantasy collages are composed with art historical/ pop culture references and memes/imagery found on Instagram and TikTok laced together with my own unique creations. The viewer is encouraged to explore these works and discover details that invoke (or trigger) happiness and nostalgia, hope for a fun future (maybe a future as soon as later tonight) or even rage, if that is what you enjoy.” 

Hayes has participated in a number of successful solo and group exhibitions, including The Untitled Space group shows, “IRL: Investigating Reality” 2019, “EDEN” at SPRING/BREAK ART SHOW 2019, “SECRET GARDEN: The Female Gaze on Erotica” 2017, and “LIFEFORCE” 2016. This will be her first solo exhibition at the gallery. 

Jeanette Hayes (b. 1988) is a painter/multimedia artist based in New York. Originally from Chicago, Hayes moved to NYC and received a BFA from Pratt Institute. Her work addresses the traditional preservation of non-traditional technological and pop imagery through painting, video, digital manipulation, and Internet collages. Hayes’ interests include cultural phenomena and the confrontation of conventionality and subject matter. Her fascination with the amalgamation of images we each navigate through everyday and their correlations to civilization and ownership in 2019 has propelled her practice. With international solo shows in Sweden, Italy and Belgium, Hayes has also shown in New York Hayes at Half Gallery, the Hole, Regina Rex, Castor Gallery, Romeo, Bleecker Street Arts Club, the National Arts Club and more. 

Most recently, Hayes was curated by the Culture Corps to create a public art installation at the Hudson Yards, which is currently on view until November, 2019. Jeanette Hayes has made animated GIFs and videos for Proenza Schouler, CHANEL, Alexander Wang, Cynthia Rowley, Vogue and Opening Ceremony. She has received artist sponsorships from BlackBerry and Blick Art and was chosen by Purple magazine to create their artist book in 2016, which she titled “five”. Hayes has been featured in the New York Times, Vogue Japan, i-D, Complex Magazine, Interview Magazine, Dazed, the Coveteur, Purple Magazine, Paper Magazine, Playboy and TimeOut New York chose Hayes as one of the “5 most important new artists in New York City.” Jeanette Hayes lives and works in New York City. 

ABOUT THE UNTITLED SPACE:

The Untitled Space is an art gallery located in Tribeca, New York in a landmark building on Lispenard Street. Founded in 2015 by Indira Cesarine, the gallery features an ongoing curation of exhibits of emerging and established contemporary artists exploring conceptual framework and boundary pushing ideology through mediums of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video and performance art. The gallery is committing to exploring new ideas vis-à-vis traditional and new mediums and highlights a program of women in art as well as special events aligned with our creative vision. 

ABOUT CURATOR INDIRA CESARINE

Indira Cesarine’s work as a curator for The Untitled Space gallery includes solo shows for artists Sarah Maple, Rebecca Leveille, Alison Jackson, Fahren Feingold, and Kat Toronto aka Miss Meatface as well as group shows “EDEN” and “(HOTEL) XX” at SPRING/BREAK Art Show; ”SECRET GARDEN” presenting the female gaze on erotica; “SHE INSPIRES,” a group show of 60 artists exhibiting works honoring inspirational women; internationally-celebrated group shows “UPRISE/ANGRY WOMEN,” and “ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE” responding to the political climate in America since the election of Trump, as well as numerous other critically-acclaimed exhibitions.

Recent press on Indira Cesarine & The Untitled Space includes Vogue (US), Vogue Italia, CNN, Forbes, Newsweek, W Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, Teen Vogue, New York Magazine, i-D Magazine, Dazed and Confused, and The Huffington Post among many others. http://untitled-space.com/featured-press/

Exhibit link: http://untitled-space.com/hot-girl-summer-art-by-jeanette-hayes-a-solo-exhibition/

KELSEY NAPIER

MAKAPUU

oil on canvas

36″ x 60″

Kelsey NaPier

I spent the first eighteen years of my life growing up on the south shore of Oahu. I learned how to surf at age three, feeling grounded by the constant blue horizon and the majestic Hawaiian mountains. Growing up on the most isolated land mass in the world I paid attention to every brilliant piece of nature unfolding before me with the changing tradewinds. I often use the colors of my childhood, lush green, cobalt blue, tangerine, and magenta as building blocks for my paintings. In Hawaii, the people, language, food, and customs are a mixture of the many cultures of people who came to the islands – Samoan, Native Hawaiian, Japanese, Chinese, English, Korean, and Filipino. Beauty comes in unexpected forms and from many points of view.

When I see something beautiful that I do not fully understand, I have an impulse to paint it. What I’m physically attracted to may be the sherbert clouds resting on steep Hawaiian mountains in Paka Nahele , the porcelain skin of a friend in Amber , or the ephemeral floating tentacles of a jellyfish in Float . I find something physically stunning because there is a certain spiritual element beckoning me to search for the sublime.

Heaven is that feeling when just for a second you have a glimpse past our physical world and into something else. Just after the sun has gone down in Makapu’u , the ocean becomes mercurial. In Erin Surfs , my sister effortlessly dances upon the waves and becomes one with the ocean.

In Float I explored a recurring dream of floating through nebulas in space with no gravity. Weightlessness, a feeling similar to the buoyancy when swimming in the ocean, flooded my heart with a sense of peace. I sought to capture that by making a photo collage of nebulas, jellyfish, and synapse firing. I painted loosely from the collage, pouring paint from one canvas onto another. Every time I liked an effect, I replicated it and enhanced it by adding drop shadows and pops of color. I painted over the parts that felt unnecessary and moved forward adding, subtracting, and refining my vision.

I enjoy painting large pieces because they are challenging and take the movement of the entire body- the feet, the arms, and the core. Painting large makes me feel like I’m dancing with a partner.

My purpose is to seek these beautiful moments and to relay them to other people. I believe that we are connected in ways that we cannot always immediately see. My time on earth will have been meaningful if I have felt gratitude for the beauty around me, engaged with the sublime, and allowed other people to feel that same joy. This world is inherently meaningful. Art is the seeking of this meaning.

PELE RISES

32″ x 72″

oil on canvas

MIXED

72″ x 96″

oil on wood

_

For more artwork: http://www.kelseynapier.com

TUNJI ADENIYI-JONES × EXHIBITION A

Tunji Adeniyi-Jones

Blue Dancer

28″ x 22″, archival pigment print

Signed edition of 50

$250

BUY NOW

Tunji Adeniyi-Jones explores the visual motifs and mythologies from ancient West African art through his high-gloss paintings imbued with lyrical grace and effortless movement. Drawing inspiration from the aesthetic traditions from ancient West African Kingdoms, specifically the deities of the Yoruba (orisha), Adeniyi-Jones channels the spiritual undercurrent significant to these cultures via arrestingly beautiful painted characters who fill the entirety of the canvas, enfolded in saturated transportive hues.

His new Exhibition A print edition, Blue Dancer, is based on the painting of the same name that was recently featured in his solo exhibition at Nicelle Beauchene. A voluptuous figure is suspended in space, time, composition; navigating through a rich azure color field with an acrobatic otherworldly grace reminiscent of the orisha.

Tunji Adeniyi-Jones recently mounted a solo show at Nicelle Beauchene Gallery. Selected group shows include No Foundation (Toronto), Mulherin Gallery (New York), New Release Gallery (New York). and Golbourne Gallery (London). Adeniyi-Jones received his BFA from University of Oxford in 2014 and MFA from Yale University in 2017.

FOLLOW EXHIBITION A

Al Freeman at 56 Henry

SHOP EXHIBITION A

Clockwise from top left:

Becky Kolsrud, Iman Raad, Claire Tabouret, and Arcmanoro Niles.

Joy Moser

Night Cloud #11, Joy Moser

Teachers College, Columbia University to Exhibit Abstract Sky-scapes by Faculty Member Joy Moser
  
WHAT: 

“Night Clouds,” an Exhibit of Abstract Paintings of the Natural World

WHO: 

Joy Moser, Artist and Adjunct Professor, Teachers College, Columbia University

WHEN: 

September 5-28

Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; 

Friday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.


WHERE: 

Teachers College, Columbia University

Macy Gallery
4th Floor, Macy Hall (Room 444)
120th and Broadway, New York City

(Night Cloud #21, Joy Moser)

BACKGROUND: Joy Moser, a painter and longtime adjunct professor at Teachers College, started out as an abstract painter, switched for a time to more naturalistic landscapes, and with the “Night Clouds” exhibit at Teachers College in September, returns to abstraction. “Landscapes are tricky,” Moser says. “If you’re not careful, you can end up painting sappy calendar pictures. What I wanted was the mystery – to take you someplace you want to go but can’t quite figure out. So I’m excited to be going back to abstraction.”
 
Moser’s sky-scapes are anything but sappy. Her clouds are massive, unknown life forms caught in rare close-ups, in motion against often ominous blues. Like an eclipse, you can imagine them causing people across different states and countries to stop on street corners to look up, eyes shaded, with a mixture of awe and dread.
 
“Painting in general, and landscape in particular, has a kind of universality,” says Moser, who came to TC in 1992 at the request of faculty member Judith Burton to teach for a single semester and never left. “Unlike books or film, they don’t need translation. And with all the terrible stuff going on in the world, that’s a good thing.”
 
Admission to the exhibition is free of charge