Posts tagged with "Olsen Gruin"

LEILA JEFFREYS, HIGH SOCIETY, nyc, 360 MAGAZINE

LEILA JEFFREYS

LEILA JEFFREYS

HIGH SOCIETY


Opens Friday November 15, 6-8pm  

30 Orchard Street, New York, NY, 10002
Exhibition November 13 2019 – January 19, 2020

Artist Q&A and Documentary Screening: Saturday November 16, 4 for 4:30pm at Olsen Gruin

Olsen Gruin is pleased to present High Society, an exhibition of new works by Australian photographic artist, Leila Jeffreys. Her second solo exhibition since 2017, High Society will be on view at Olsen Gruin from November 13, 2019 until January 19, 2020.

Revisiting the world of the Budgerigar – the subject of her first solo exhibition some nine years ago – Leila Jeffreys’ High Society includes her signature large format portraits and sees her exploring new territory. Working with over 300 budgerigars in a studio High Society reveals a beautiful society of birds through still photography and three panel video art.

Acclaimed for her empathetic artistic vision and intuitive approach, Leila Jeffreys has again captured a vivid sense of personality in her feathered subjects. Each work forges an emotional and sympathetic bond with the audience as Leila Jeffreys establishes parallels between the ‘flock’ and our human concept of ‘community’; a commentary on our need to preserve wildlife societies and their homes.

“There exists a symbolic relationship between birds and trees,” says Leila Jeffreys. “Their survival depends on each other. We depend on them. High Society serves as a visual reminder to leave wild places for these other societies to enjoy, as well as our own.”

Leila Jeffreys (b. 1972) was born in Papua New Guinea and raised in Perth, Australia. Thanks to her adventurous parents she spent much of her childhood travelling and grew up surrounded by wildlife and forest both in Australia and abroad. This sparked her interest in the natural world. Jeffreys works with conservationists, ornithologists and bird sanctuaries to separate her charismatic subjects from their natural surroundings and photograph them with a high degree of technical skill. She is an exhibiting artist with gallery representation in Sydney, London and New York. Her work has also been featured in the iconic Bergdorf Goodman department store windows in New York City. Her book Birdland was launched at Australia’s National Portrait Gallery in Canberra. A documentary titled Bird Nerd: the Art of Leila Jeffreys will debut on the film festival circuit mid-2019 ahead of its television premiere on the ABC later this year. The film is written and directed by Walkley Award winner Poppy Stockell and was commissioned by ABC Arts.

Camille Hannah, Olsen Gruin, art, design, 360 MAGAZINE, Australia

Camille Hannah

Olsen Gruin is pleased to present The Sixteen Pleasures, a solo exhibition by Australian artist Camille HannahThe Sixteen Pleasures will be on view at Olsen Gruin from October 9 – November 9, 2019. The exhibition design leads viewers with subtle intensity through a dynamic installation of variously scaled paintings and mirrors. During this journey, reflected glimpses of the self coalesce with Hannah’s paintings, creating spillage between the territories that define body and artwork. Enveloped and embraced within these abstract landscapes, viewers experience a bodily extension: a potent sensation which exceeds rational grasp.

By traversing this alluring amalgamation of imagery, the viewer becomes both witness and participant in the creation of these compelling ‘virtual’ paintings. These seductive, enigmatic images of desire echo the artist’s ongoing explorations around the expansive, unbounded nature of female desire and of the carnal disruption inherent to perceptual experience in the digital realm.

The Sixteen Pleasures also evokes the sensory experience of film, video and the mesmerizing back-lit screens that saturate our modern world. It is richly infused with the artist’s extensive enquiries into art history, philosophy, poetry, sexuality and contemporary culture, filtered through the personal narrative of each individual viewer. With this exhibition Hannah aims to create a boundless, all-encompassing landscape in which the viewer is captivated by an exhilarating and thought-provoking, physiological experience.

Camille Hannah attained a Masters of Fine Art by Research in 2013 and a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree in 2010, at the Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne, Australia where she was the recipient of an Australian Postgraduate Scholarship Award. In 2018 she won the Wyndham Art Prize, and in 2017 was selected as a finalist for the Arte Laguna Prize, Nappa Arsenale, Venice, Italy and as winner of the Special Exhibition Prize of a solo exhibition at Galerie Isabelle Lesmeister, Regensburg, Germany in 2018. In 2015 she was selected by an international jury to win the T.I.N.A. Art Prize, Maurizio Caldirola Arte Contemporanea, Milan, Italy, and was a finalist & winner of the People’s Choice Award in the Gold Coast Art Prize, Qld, Australia. Hannah was shortlisted in 2014 for Contemporary Visions V, Beers Contemporary Gallery, London, and in 2012 she won the Kozica-O’Callaghan Award for Painting. Other awards include the Premio Ora Art Prize, Italy 2013 International Catalogue and being shortlisted for the Arte Laguna Art Prize, Venice Arsenale, Italy and the Wynne Prize, Art Gallery of NSW, 2012.

Marie Hagerty + Peter Vandermark

Olsen Gruin is pleased to present dual solo exhibitions featuring works by Australian artists Marie Hagerty and Peter Vandermark. The exhibitions will be opened with an introduction by Dr. Anne Summers. Hagerty’s collection, titled The Edge, comprises large acrylic and oil paintings. Her works bend the surface of the canvas by creating space where there is none and thereby superseding the canvas itself. At first glance, the viewer is transfixed by oblong configurations of reds, blues, browns, and greys that are implicated in a two-dimensional landscape of organic configured movement. Further concentration reveals plane upon plane of depth within the painting. Through a mastering of contour and shadow, Hagerty creates a multi-planar world the viewer can nearly jump into.

Peter Vandermark’s series of works on display includes 10 geometric, sculptural imaginings of humanity’s interaction with space and the built environment. This group of abstract three-dimensional works is composed of timber along with painted and mirrored acrylic. Stemming from a commentary on the modernist desire to integrate both life and art, these geometric and reflective pieces render a unique spatial experience for the viewer. For Vandermark, the relationship between the work and viewer is a private and intimate experience. Simultaneously, Vandermark’s sculptures are models of architectural landscapes; creating an abstracted and interior landscape of wanderlust. In a designed and curated modern world, Vandermark’s work analyses the evolution of humanity’s interaction with scale, dimensions and textures of inhabitation.

 

Marie Hagerty (b. 1964) is a Sydney born artist who shifted to Canberra about 30 years ago and has been working primarily as a painter. Hagerty has a very effective and curiously unusual hybrid approach, both in her techniques of painting, employing traditional oils and modern acrylic, as well as in her conceptual framework. She seamlessly combines within a non-figurative composition seemingly figurative elements realized within a high degree of verisimilitude to surfaces and textures. Above all, her paintings display a high degree of visual intelligence in their subtle play of push and pull optics across the sensuous rolling surface. In recent years her paintings have been included in curated and invitational exhibitions at the National Gallery of Victoria, the Ian Potter Museum of Art in Melbourne, the Gallery of Modern Art in Brisbane and the Canberra Museum. Hagerty is represented by Olsen Gallery in Sydney and Karen Woodbury Gallery in Melbourne.

 

Peter Vandermark (b. 1960) is a Melbourne born artist interested in the evolution of humanity’s interaction with an increasingly artificial and curated world. “It is one of Vandermark’s strengths as a sculptor that he absorbs and explores the entirety of the designed three-dimensional world, rather than only having a dialogue with the past fine art sculpture. His interests are in the domestic, the urban, the architectural, the mechanical, the semiotic (signs and signage), and even the way in which spoken language can manifest as a ‘solid’ which impacts upon the world.”

APY LANDS

APY LANDS

Opens March 5, 5-8pm

Beginning with a talk featuring Yaritji Young from Tjala Arts

30 Orchard Street, New York, NY, 10002

Exhibition until 14 April, 2019

Olsen Gruin is pleased to present APY Lands, a group exhibition featuring works by celebrated female Aboriginal artists from the north west of South Australia. This show comprises painted depictions of the transcendental and its transubstantiation into the material world. These works reflect a new direction in indigenous art that refers to an ancient mythology that is still pertinent and very much a part of contemporary art today.

For the indigenous peoples of Australia, Dreamtime functions as a way to remember the past, understand the present, and interpret the future. “Australian Aboriginal art was the last great movement of the 20th century, that began 60,000 years earlier,” as claimed by Robert Hughes. The artists featured in APY Lands, strive to communicate this metaphysical and spiritual world-view by illustrating the remarkable stories of Dreamtime. Exhibiting artists include Yaritji Young, Wawiriya Burton, Mona Mitakiki Shepherd, Tjimpayi Presley, Naomi Kantjuriny, Maringka Tunkin, Freda Brady, Sandra Ken, Sylvia Kanytjupai Ken, and Tjungkara Ken. APY Lands will be on view from March 5 – April 14, 2019.

Several of the works featured, are the result of a collaborative effort between the artists featured in APY Lands, who gather at Tjala Arts. Located in the Amata community, Tjala Arts is in far North-West South Australia on the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands. An Aboriginal owned and managed corporation, Tjala Arts is a professional art making studio known for their vibrant use of colour and energetic mark making. Works by Tjala artists have been acquired by many high-profile collectors across Australia and abroad and are held in numerous public institutions including the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of NSW, the National Gallery of Victoria and the Art Gallery of South Australia.

Yaritji Young, one of the most prolific solo artists featured in APY Lands, focuses on the story of Tjala Tjukurpa (Honey Ant Dreaming). She paints the rock holes and landmarks of her country, entwined with icons and traditional marks that relate to inma (dance) and tjukurpa (dreaming). The twisted lines and shapes mimic tunnels and formations made by the Tjala honey ant. Her works beautifully express the energetic life that exists below the red monolith that is the Australian desert. Straying from the traditional aboriginal colour scheme of red, oranges, and yellows, Yaritjiinstead transports the viewer into a subjective synaesthetic interpretation of an already vibrant land and environment.

“When I paint, my mind travels back to when I was a child, watching my ancestors paint these stories on their bodies and on the caves. Everything I have learnt from them I am teaching my grandchildren now. Today, we have new materials and paint in new ways, but the celebration and commitment to our culture always remains the same.” Yaritji Young.

Naomi Kantjuriny, Mona Mitakiki and Tjimpayi Presley and several of the other artists have worked together to depict the Seven Sisters Story. This is a Tjukurpa Story (Creation Story) about the constellations of Pleiades and Orion. The sisters are the constellation of Pleiades and the other star Orion is said to be Nyiru or Nyirunya Nyiru; a lusty and bad man who forever chases the sisters known as the Kunkarunkara women in order to marry the eldest sister. The seven sisters travel again and again from the sky to the earth to escape Nyiru’s unwanted attentions. They turn into their human form to escape from the persistent Nyiru, but he always finds them and they flee back to the sky. As Nyiru is chasing the sisters he tries to catch them by using magic to turn into the most tempting kampurarpra (bush tomatoes) for the sisters to eat and the most beautiful Ili (fig) tree for them to camp under. However, the sisters are too clever for Nyiru and continue to outwit him. Every now and again, though, one of the women falls victim to his ways. Eventually the sisters fly back into the sky to escape Nyiru, reforming the constellation.

Dreamtime can seem somehow to reanimate memories of an ancient time that were never lived. Simultaneously, it can catalyze a futuristic abstraction of reality. Freda Brady’s Seven Sisters, depicts the Tjukurpa Story through traditional dot painting. The dotted orange, yellow, red, and brown lines move freely through the painting; creating a feeling of immense dynamism. The colors and architecture of the piece are reminiscent of the earth, which the sisters travel in order to escape Nyiru. However, the sinuous interconnected dotted lines emote a cosmic intention. Brady therefore, harmoniously combines both the terrestrial and celestial elements of the same story through a division and confluence of subject matter and form. This unique art refers to a timeless understanding of the earth and the stars. Its stories are sometimes a different kind of mythological language that we see repeated in other spiritual texts even from the Aztecs or the Ancient Greeks. While this work also acts as maps or paths where the land collides with the universe, it contains elements that allude to certain art throughout history. There is a ‘Tache’ in some of the painterly and structural aspects of this work that parallel the spontaneous qualities of Abstract Expressionism, which was essentially a NY art movement from the middle of the last century. The content of this work whilst drawing direct references to landscape and storytelling, can be considered as holding a very pertinent place in 21st century conceptual art.

Yaritji Young (b. c1954) has been painting at Tjala Arts (formerly Minymaku Arts) since late 2000. She is a senior law woman and is committed to fostering law and culture. Yaritji was born in Ernabella, South Australia and now resides at Rocket Bore, a homeland north of Amata in Nortern Australia. Her works are drawn from the Tjala (Honey Ant) Dreaming. Yaritji Young is an emerging artist who demonstrates great skill.

Mona Mitakiki Shepherd (b. c1954) started painting with Tjurma Arts and Crafts back in 1998. After a long break she returned to painting at Tjala Arts (formerly Minymaku Arts) in mid 2003. Mona’s husband, Michael Mitakiki also painted briefly at the art centre. After the death of her husband in May 2005 Mona changed her surname from Mitakiki to Shepherd for cultural reasons. Pitjantjatjara people are not allowed to see or hear the name of the deceased.

Naomi Kantjuriny (b. 1944) is a prolific painter who has been working at Tjala Arts (formerly Minymaku) Arts since 2001. An excellent hunter, basket maker and wood carver, Naomi took to painting with remarkable ease. She is recognized for her knowledge of the Tjukurpa stories of the area and whilst she is a new and emerging artist, her technique is well developed. Naomi’s mother’s Dreaming is Malu or kangaroo. Naomi is also a Ngangkari – traditional healer. Ngangkari provide traditional healing treatments and practices of the mind, body and spirit. They are exactly like Western doctors and equal to doctors in their effectiveness for the Aboriginal people of her region.

Tjimpayi Presley (b. 1967) is the daughter of Tjampawa Katie Kawiny who is also a painter at Tjala Arts. Tjimpayi is well known for her ‘punu’ woodblocks, a process that involves burning the design into a wooden surface using hot wire. However, she is also a talented painter and has recently started making beautiful work on canvas.

Maringka Tunkin (b. c1954) grew up in Amata where she attended Primary school. She went to boarding High School at Yurara in Alice Springs. Maringka previously painted at the Tjurma Homelands Art and Craft centre which was situated also in Amata. At Tjurma she painted on canvas and created pieces of batik. Maringka returned to painting in 2007 when she joined the other artists at Tjala Arts.

Freda Brady (b. 1961) was raised in the Amata community. She is the daughter of Paniny Mick and Mick Wikilyiri, both senior and highly regarded painters at Tjala Arts. Freda began her artistic career in 2002 creating batik. More recently, Freda has committed to her painting practice with great vigor and is an emerging artist with impressive skill.

Sandra Ken (b. c1954) lives in Amata with her husband Dick and four children. Sandra’s first art experiences were working and learning to paint in the craft room at Tjurma homelands Arts and Craft centre in Amata. Sandra’s painting further developed with the opening of Minymaku Arts, and she continues her practice with vigour at Tjala Arts. She is particularly excited about the large-scale collaborative works she paints with her four sisters; Yaritji Young, Tjungkara Ken, Maringka Tunkin, and Freda Brady.

Tjungkara Ken (b. c1954) is a young and dedicated artist, with a remarkable depth of talent and expertise. Tjungkara started painting casually in 1997 but increased her commitment to her work in 2008 and continues her practice with vigour. Her mother’s country is Wingalina and her father’s country is Amata. Tjungkara depicts this country and its tjukurpa (dreaming) in her paintings with her distinctive style. Mountain ranges, rock holes and elements of the land are all illustrated throughout her detailed work. She is well known for her sophisticated use of colour and striking works depicting the Seven Sisters story.

Wawiriya Burton (b. 1925) is a senior woman from the Amata community. In her painting, Wawiriya tells the story of her father’s country near Pipalyatjara, west of Amata in South Australia.

Sylvia Kanytjupai Ken (b. 1965) has been painting at Tjala Arts (formerly Minymaku Arts) since 1999. She is a committed and focused artist with exceptional skill and talent. Her mother Iluwanti and father Brenton also paint at Tjala Arts, as do her daughters Serena Heffernan and Anastine Ken.

For further information please contact the gallery at info@olsengruin.com or +1.646.525.6213.  All images are subject to copyright. Gallery approval must be granted prior to reproduction.

Olsen Gruin Gallery

Holiday gallery closing: Dec. 22 – Jan 9

Winter group exhibition PENUMBRA opens Tuesday, January 15, 2019
Until Saturday, March 2, 2019
Exhibition reception: Wednesday, January 30, 6-8PM

2019 Olsen Gruin gallery hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 11am – 6pm
Sunday by appointment

Browse available works on our website

 

 

olsengruin.com

Olsen Gruin
30 Orchard St, New York NY 10002
M: +1 646 525 6213
info@olsengruin.com

Tuesday–Saturday 11am–6pm

Kevin Bourgeois: Wall Of Sound

Olsen Gruin announces Wall of Sound, an exhibition featuring music-inspired multimedia works by Kevin Bourgeois. The anticipated show comprises a curated selection of collage and acrylic compositions on wood panel.

Music has always been an intrinsic element in Bourgeois’ creative process and daily routine. “I consider it a universal cultural language with many diverse incarnations and forms,” he affirms. Wall of Sound turns its focus toward the visual art that complements the vast lexicon of music.

The phrase “Wall of Sound” was originally devised to describe Phil Spector’s production methods. According to Spector, the aim was “to create a dense aesthetic critical shorthand, mixed well enough that the audience would then perceive each of the different combinations as one distinct sound or form.” This concept mirrors the augmenting process Bourgeois implemented in creating this body of work.

Through collage Bourgeois seeks to transform the literal imagery of each album’s formal narrative. His process of embellishment and jigsaw remixing of multiple record jacket sources results in an alternative visual dialogue and imbues an abstracted or figurative aesthetic to be interpreted by the viewer.

Leila Jeffreys’ Feathers Pair with Fashion at Bergdorf Goodman

Olsen Gruin congratulates artist Leila Jeffreys on her magnificent window display at Bergdorf Goodman in New York.

Leila Jeffreys was raised in Perth, Australia, however thanks to her very adventurous parents, spent much of her childhood travelling. Jeffreys grew up surrounded by wildlife and forest both in Australia and abroad, sparking her interest in the natural world. Jeffreys began documenting birds by way of photographic portraiture in 2008, when she realised that it was because of their small size that the beauty in the commonplace was being missed.

Catch the works on view through June 5th!

Artworks are available at Olsen Gruin

BEYOND THE VEIL × ADAM KNIGHT

BEYOND THE VEIL

CURATED BY ADAM KNIGHT

EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE
EVELYN PULTARA
GABRIELLA POSSUM NUNGARRAYI
GAYLA PWERLE
POLLY NGALE
THE WOMEN’S COLLABORATIVE

Opening Reception:

May 16, 6-8PM

Exhibition:
May 16 – Jul 8, 2018

Emily Kame Kngwarreye
Untitled, 1991
Synthetic polymer paints on Belgian linen
58.8 x 35.2 ”  (149.4 x 89.4 cm)

Evelyn Pultara
Bush Yam, 2015
Synthetic polymer paints on Belgian linen
35.8 x 48.4 ”  (90.9 x 122.9 cm)

Olsen Gruin is pleased to present Beyond the Veil, a group exhibition of Western Desert Paintings curated by the President of the Aboriginal Art Association of Australia, Adam Knight. The anticipated show features select works by Emily Kame KngwarreyeEvelyn Pultara, Gabriella Possum NungurrayiGayla PwerlePolly Ngale, and the Women’s Collaborative comprising Beverly Cameron; Kathy Marinkga, Imitjala Curley, and Tjangili George, and will be on view from May 16 – July 8, 2018.

Beyond the Veil celebrates the divine use of dots by Australian Aboriginal artists. It honors the unique method of layering and the shimmering presence of dots throughout the whole of each canvas by the true inventors of this now praised artistic style. As Aboriginal art further secures its place as a significant movement in the international art world, it is undeniable that non-indigenous artists from around the globe will find inspiration within these prized works.

It is widely accepted that Australian Aboriginals have the oldest continuous culture on the planet. The rise of contemporary Australian Aboriginal art was described by art critic and writer Robert Hughes, as “the last great art movement of the twentieth century.” Whilst the works are considered contemporary, they are derived from a cultural awareness and sacred knowledge that remains preserved by artists such as those exhibited here.

Beyond the Veil aims to remind viewers of the cultural narrative that celebrates the presence of the dot and acknowledges the genius of its use by its originators: the artists from Australia’s first people.

For further information please contact the gallery at info@olsengruin.com or at +1.646.525.6213.  All images are subject to copyright. Gallery approval must be granted prior to reproduction.

Emily Kame Kngwarreye
Untitled, 1993
Synthetic polymer paints on Belgian linen
23.6 x 35 ”  (59.9 x 88.9 cm)

olsengruin.com

Olsen Gruin

30 Orchard St, New York NY 10002

M: +1 646 525 6213

emerald@olsengruin.com

Wednesday–Sunday 11am–6pm

LEILA JEFFREYS —ORNITHURAE

Olsen Gruin and Brooke Shields invite you to the opening of

LEILA JEFFREYS

ORNITHURAE VOLUME 1

Opening: Friday 13 October, 5–8pm
Exhibition continues until 12th November

Leila Jeffreys

Superb Fruit-dove 2017

fine art inkjet print on cotton rag archival paper 

44″ x 35″ (standard size)

55″ x 44″ (large size)

Edition of 25 (standard), 6 (large size)

OLSEN GRUIN is pleased to present “Ornithurae” a new selection of work by the Australian artist, photographer and environmentalist Leila Jeffreys.   

Jeffreys has photographed native birds in her home country and the US (she was personally invited to shoot at Ojai Raptor Center, a sanctuary for wounded birds in California). Her unique work has featured everything from budgies to eagles; wrens to pigeons; cockatoos to hawks.

After noticing how unengaged people seemed to be with birds, she began working on a series of portrait sessions, hoping to portray birds in a way that displayed their incredible beauty and diversity, and to inspire a deeper concern for their well-being. Her first solo exhibition focused on budgies, the ubiquitous family pet. Then, for her next series, she worked alongside wildlife carers to create a series of portraits of wild cockatoos. This was followed by ‘Prey’, which focused on Australia’s hunting birds, and has since worked on numerous shows exhibited around the world. She has also published an illustrated hard cover book in the US, Canada and UK entitled ‘Bird Love’ through Abrams.

During World War II 200 Americans were saved by a note-carrying pigeon that survived Japanese bombardment in New Guinea. Homing pigeons have a very long history of service, reportedly carrying messages for the Moghuls, Crusaders, Romans, Saracens, Egyptian pharaohs and ancient Persians. 

The Reuters media service started out as pigeons carrying stock market prices to and from Brussels. Santa Catalina Island had a pigeon service taking mail to Los Angeles in the 1890s, and Orissa, India, had a police pigeon service that lasted until 2004. All of this was possible because pigeons, when taken somewhere new, even inside a dark box, can reliably find their way home. 

Psychologists take pigeons seriously for their own reasons, respecting them as birds that excel at visual categorisation. Domestic pigeons in experiments have distinguished letters of the alphabet, different emotions on human faces, paintings by Picasso and Monet, and even breast cancer tumours on scans. 

We ought not take pigeons for granted. To pigeonhole them as urban scroungers does them an injustice. Australian bird photographer Leila Jeffreys has taken it on herself to show them as they truly are, as beings with the power to surprise. They are pigeons as we are not used to seeing them, as if our conventional friends, to surprise us, have decked themselves up in party gear. Pigeons were domesticated thousands of years ago, long before chickens or ducks, which makes them the bird on earth to which we have the longest close relationship. Pigeons matter. 

While most street pigeons are as drab as businessmen in suits, the birds of Australasia come dressed as if for a mardi gras, in purples, yellows and other fearless colors. The vivid rainforest fruits they eat have given them an appreciation for colors on each other. Leila will also be exhibiting new works featuring Cockatoos and hundreds of budgerigars in trees to bring ‘Ornithurae’ to life. 

Tim Low ­—author of best-selling book “Where song began’

We would be delighted if you joined us for Leila Jeffrey’s inaugural show at 30 Orchard Street, Friday October 13th, 5-8pm.    

Leila Jeffreys

Cyril Moluccan Cockatoo 2017

fine art inkjet print on cotton rag archival paper 

44″ x 35″ (standard size)

55″ x 44″ (large size)

Edition of 50 (standard), 6 (large size)

olsengruin.com

OLSEN GRUIN NEW LOCATION

Olsen Gruin is pleased to announce the opening of our new ground floor location in the heart of the Lower East Side gallery district. Sharing Country, rated as one of the top #10 summer shows to see in NY by ArtNet is currently on view at 30 Orchard.

Opening: Thursday 27 July5–8pm

Exhibition continues until August 10.

In addition, ALPHACHANNELING Group Summer Show will open, Friday, July 28.
Alphachanneling’s sensual compositions reference ancient, tantric, Taoist, Hindu and Buddhist tropes. Jerry Saltz exclaimed “there’s an outsider-ish Henri Rousseau quality… Sigmar Polke’s easiness of line and simplicity.” Alphachanneling describes the work as “a devotional prayer to the feminine principal.”

Opening: Friday 28 July5–8pm

Exhibition continues until August 31.

unnamed