Posts tagged with "nutrition"

World Peas Peatos on Dr. Oz Show

It’s an exciting time for World Peas Peatos! We will be on Dr. Oz tomorrow, Wed. Nov. 7. Since its launch in March 2018, Peatos has become one of the top-selling pea-based snacks and one of the fastest growing snacks in the produce section.  Tune in to learn more about the meteoric rise of plant-based protein snacks and delicious alternatives in the produce section!

“Consumers have been hungry for a snack that provides the combined taste of “junk -food” with all the benefits of plant-based nutrition, a no compromise snack like Peatos.” Nick Desai, CEO, World Peas Peatos. “Celebrities and influencers have continued to give us praise.”

Peatos are a plant protein-based crunchy, puffed snack made of pulses that has twice the protein (4 grams) and three times the fiber (3 grams) of Cheetos® per serving. Peatos also boasts clean, non-GMO ingredients, has no artificial flavors, no synthetic colors and no added MSG. Striking flavors include the popular Classic Cheese, Fiery Hot, Chili Cheese, and Masala.

Find @WorldPeasPeatos on Facebook.com/worldpeasbrand  and Twitter

Twitter

Peatos: https://twitter.com/WorldPeasPeatos/status/1059938774908461056

Facebook

Peatos: https://www.facebook.com/worldpeasbrand/posts/1858572874192133

UFC × Trifecta

UFC®, the world’s premier mixed martial arts organization, today announced a new, multi-year marketing partnership with Trifecta Nutrition, the nation’s largest all-organic meal delivery service. Under the groundbreaking new agreement, Trifecta becomes UFC’s first-ever “Official Meal Delivery Partner”, creating a brand-new sponsorship category for UFC. In return, Trifecta will have a branded presence at the UFC Performance Institute®, the state-of-the-art athlete training facility in Las Vegas, and an activation presence at UFC’s live events. UFC and Trifecta will also collaborate on a co-branded video series and social media campaigns, and Trifecta will utilize UFC branding to create custom delivery boxes and to promote national sweepstakes for UFC events.

“We’re excited to bring Trifecta on board to create a new partnership category for UFC,” said Paul Asencio, UFC Senior Vice President, Global Partnerships. “Meal delivery is a rapidly growing market, and the quality meals and industry leading service Trifecta provides can benefit both fitness-conscious athletes and everyday consumers.”

“UFC is the ideal partner to help us evangelize clean eating and further spread the word about the weight management advantages of healthy meal prep and meal delivery with Trifecta,” said Greg Connolly, Trifecta Co-Founder & CEO. “We have the opportunity to showcase our true value to the fans of UFC with some of the exciting programs we are rolling out together in the coming months.”

UFC and Trifecta first collaborated in November 2017 for UFC® 217: BISPING vs. ST-PIERRE at Madison Square Garden, where the companies unveiled a co-branded training and nutrition video featuring former UFC bantamweight champion Cody Garbrandt. Garbrandt, one of Trifecta’s brand ambassadors, will next face UFC bantamweight champion TJ Dillashaw in a rematch for the UFC bantamweight title in the main event of UFC® 227: DILLASHAW vs. GARBRANDT 2, live on Saturday, August 4, from STAPLES Center in Los Angeles.

In addition to Garbrandt, Trifecta boasts an impressive roster of athletes and celebrities such as “Fittest Man on Earth” Rich Froning, actor Liam Hemsworth, Wonder Woman/Justice League actor and CrossFit star Brooke Ence, and Detroit Lions tight end Luke Willson, along with more than 130 additional NFL players, celebrities and celebrity athletes.

About UFC®

UFC® is a premium global sports brand and the largest Pay-Per-View event provider in the world. Celebrating its 25thAnniversary in 2018, UFC boasts more than 284 million fans worldwide and has produced over 440 events in 22 countries since its inception in 1993. Acquired in 2016 by global sports, entertainment and fashion leader Endeavor (formerly WME | IMG), together with strategic partners Silver Lake Partners and KKR, UFC is headquartered in Las Vegas with a network of employees around the world. UFC produces more than 40 live events annually that consistently sell out some of the most prestigious arenas around the globe, while programming is broadcast in over 160 countries and territories to 1.1 billion TV households worldwide in 40 different languages. UFC FIGHT PASS®, a digital subscription service, delivers exclusive live events, thousands of fights on-demand and original content to fans around the world. For more information, visit UFC.com and follow UFC at Facebook.com/UFC, Twitter, Snapchat and Instagram: @UFC.

About Trifecta

Trifecta is the nation’s largest all-organic meal delivery service founded with a bold mission – to get America back into shape. Eliminating shopping, cooking and cleaning by delivering fully cooked meals directly to customers’ doors in all 50 states, Trifecta’s food is the highest quality in the industry and uses 100% USDA Organic, Gluten, Dairy and Soy-Free ingredients that are never frozen, and Wild Caught/Grass Fed. All their food arrives in a refrigerated case, vacuum sealed and ready to eat. Trifecta offers meals in four categories to meet everyone’s needs including Paleo, Vegan, Clean Eating and Classic Meal and an A La Carte section that operates more like an online grocery store deli. Trifecta is a Title Sponsor of Team USA Weightlifting and the CrossFit Games, teaming up with CrossFit, Inc. to combat chronic disease. Their app “Trifecta – Fitness, Nutrition and Tracking” is the first time an all-in-one solution for people track their food and performance right from their smartphones utilizing Trifecta’s food database 5+ million food items. For more information on Trifecta, visit trifectanutrition.com, download their nutrition app at www.trifectanutrition.com/app and follow them at facebook.com/trifecta meals, @trifectasystem on Instagram and Twitter, or subscribe to them on YouTube at Trifecta.

DIGEST THIS NOW! FOR KIDS! × HEALTHY FACTS

HEALTHY FACTS FOR KIDS (& PARENTS)

12-Year-Old Nutrition Expert Shares Kids Can Be Active & Healthy

by Kai Nunziato-Cruz

Hey Guys! Kai here from Generation Kai! As a 12 year old I’m just like you, getting ready to go back to school to see my friends again. Oh yeah, and I’m going into the 7th grade! You probably don’t know who I am, and I don’t know who you are so we’re even.

360 Magazine, Kai Nunziato-Cruz

Last year I published a book called, “Digest This Now for Kids!” it’s a quick and easy read about how your body works and what you need to do to get and stay healthy. I talk about everything from food to stress (we’re not supposed to be stressed as kids but some of us are). You’d think we as kids don’t need to learn how to get and stay healthy, we’re kids, we’re supposed to be healthy. So many of us are tired, overweight, on lots of medicines already for whatever health issues we are having. I don’t know about you, but I believe at our age, this shouldn’t be happening! I get asked to write articles for magazines and online blogs all the time to give kids (and even adults) tips on how to be healthier. So, if you’re ready to get healthy and stay healthy this article is for you!

I saw an unbelievable statistic recently at a recent visit to my doctor’s office for my check-up. I thought it would make for a great article.

AMAZING STATISTIC: For every 2 hours you spend on the couch, you increase your chances of obesity by 25%.

As Buddy the Elf would say, “that’s shocking”. I mean, that’s a pretty high percentage. And most people these days are spending 4 – 5 hours on the couch every night so does that mean they are increasing their chances by 50%?

They say the reason is because when you are sitting for long periods of time you obviously aren’t moving your body, so being stagnant doesn’t help. The only thing that moves the lymph is us moving the body. If the body doesn’t move, the lymph doesn’t move. When the lymph gets backed up the toxic build-up begins which includes weight gain.

On top of this many people eat mindlessly while they watch TV – grabbing a bag of their favorite treat and eating away without even realizing how much they’re eating. Eating while watching TV is one of the most dangerous things you can do to your body. When your brain is watching TV you completely lose the mind body connection between your brain and your stomach. Your stomach can’t communicate that you are full so you keep eating.

I know many people watch hours of TV at night as a way to relax. But I’d like to challenge you to find new ways to relax. It doesn’t have to cost money to get up and do things; a walk around the block for example, trying out a new sport like tennis or racquetball, riding your bicycle around the neighborhood, go to your local park, play hide and seek around the house or play a board game, plant a garden, visit a friend, volunteer at a local hospital, take up a new hobby, etc. Honestly anything else you do aside from sit and watch TV every single night of the week is going to be better for your health – both physical health and mental health. To watch a couple of my YouTube videos on some of the things I like to do instead of watching TV click here and here, don’t forget to like and subscribe while you’re there.

I just want to challenge you to start with one night a week of doing something different. I think you will find it very refreshing and you might want to do it more and more as the weeks go on.

360 Magazine, Kai Nunziato-Cruz

ABOUT KAI NUNZIATO-CRUZ:

Kai Nunziato-Cruz is a 12-year-old nutrition expert from Arizona. As the son of Liz Cruz M.D., a board-certified Gastroenterologist, and Tina Nunziato, a Certified Holistic Nutrition Consultant, Kai has watched his Moms for years help adults get well and stay well with their books, podcast, online home study program and more and felt it was his mission to take those same teachings to kids.

For More Information Visit:

http://generationkai.com/for-kids/

Four Prediabetes Predicaments

The Common Obstacles

You May Encounter(and Solutions for Overcoming Them)

When prediabetes threatens your healthy future, it’s up to you to reset your lifestyle.

But unforeseen obstacles could derail your progress. Here, I explain the HURDLE method and offer solutions for four obstacles you might face along your journey to better health.

Jill Weisenberger, author of Prediabetes: A Complete Guide

If you have prediabetes or have been told that you’re at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, you probably know that now is the best time to take action to improve your health. And hopefully you are already working on developing some habits and setting goals to get your health under control. But new habits are tenuous and can be easily broken. It’s normal to worry that an obstacle could derail your progress and send you back into your old unhealthy (and potentially dangerous) routine.

Obstacles are always lurking anytime you’re trying to adopt healthier habits. To be successful with your lifestyle reset, you will need to anticipate obstacles and have a plan to overcome them.

To do this, I advise brainstorming as many solutions as possible, including thinking of out-of-the-box solutions.

Eventually, looking for impediments to your success will become second nature. But when starting out, I recommend using the HURDLE method to overcome obstacles.

The HURDLE method is defined here:

H: How is your upcoming schedule different? Think about your day and look at your calendar for appointments and activities. Is there something unusual or at an unusual time?

U: Understand how these events, appointments, or obligations could derail you from your healthy lifestyle goals. Will something prevent you from eating a meal, getting to exercise class on time, or getting to bed at the usual hour? Will someone else be in charge of your meals or your schedule?

R: Record your options. Brainstorm and write down every possible solution, even the silly ones.

D: Decide on a solution. Pick one or more realistic options from your list of possible solutions.

L: List the steps. Record everything that you must do to make this solution work. Include if you need to buy things, wake up early, change your schedule, ask for help, etc.

E: Exercise your choice and Evaluate it. Carry out your selected option. Make notes about how it went, what you learned, and what you will do differently next time.

Often, the best solutions to problems are the ones you figure out on your own. At the same time, there are some common obstacles most of us run into, and it can be helpful to have some time-tested solutions for how to tackle these obstacles. Here are some common roadblocks and solutions for overcoming each.

OBSTACLE: You’re Too Busy for Breakfast

Eating a healthy breakfast can kick-start your good eating choices for the day and give you the energy for physical activity. But between getting the kids ready for school, taking the dog for a morning walk, trying to get out the door, running your morning errands, and getting to work, you may struggle to find time to eat a nutritious meal. Here are a couple of suggestions:

Find a few grab-and-go options. Some options include:

Whole-wheat tortilla with reduced-fat cheese heated in the microwave

Whole-wheat waffle with peanut butter

Greek yogurt and fruit smoothie

Overnight oats with strawberries and blueberries

Tuna sandwich

Cook oatmeal or egg-and-vegetable muffins on the weekend. Grab a single serving each morning.

Take a week’s worth of breakfast food to the office on Monday. Prepare and eat your breakfast at work. A few good choices are cottage cheese with fruit and muesli, yogurt with fruit and dry cereal, and an English muffin with almond butter and banana.

Ask a family member to prepare your breakfast. Maybe someone in your household has a little extra time in the mornings or they’re already making themselves breakfast.

OBSTACLE: There’s Too Much Tempting Food at Work

You’re working to take control of what you eat but find yourself backsliding at the office. It’s a common problem. Many people stay stressed-out or frantically busy at work, and they cope by reaching for unhealthy treats. Maybe you’ve had a rough day and your manager just bought a whole box of doughnuts to share with the team. Or perhaps it’s your officemate’s birthday and everyone brought in delicious treats to share (with very few healthy options). How can you resist?

Create a rule with exceptions. An important purpose of establishing “food rules” is to free you from an internal argument of should I or shouldn’t I. But occasionally allowing for an exception to the rule helps you stay on track. These exceptions need to be created in advance and not on the fly. Making exceptions in the moment is the same as breaking your rules.

My own simple rule is that I do not eat office junk food unless it is so unusual that I’ll miss a unique experience. I had another rule for eight years in a different office that I dipped into the candy jar only on Wednesdays. I always had Wednesday to look forward to, and I never argued with myself on the other days.

Limit temptation to one area. Ask your officemates to keep tempting foods in only one spot. Try to avoid that one spot.

Ask coworkers if they also want to eliminate certain types of food from work. You might be pleasantly surprised. After all, you aren’t the only one who cares about what you eat.

Pack your coffee in a thermal container. By bringing your coffee with you, you can avoid the junk food in the office kitchen when you need a coffee refill.

OBSTACLE: You’re at a Party Full of Unhealthy Foods and Drinks

You don’t want to blow all of your progress at a party. Success starts with intention, so avoid the temptation to simply wing it. Do some planning and strategizing in advance. Also, resist the temptation to avoid parties altogether just because you fear that you will lapse from your health goals. Here are a few tips for staying on track.

Determine your trade-offs. Will you skip appetizers and starchy sides to enjoy a piece of birthday cake, or do you prefer a cocktail and an appetizer? It helps to make these decisions before heading out the door.

Be cautious with alcohol. Alcohol has a way of leading people to greater food temptations. Start with a low-calorie, non-alcoholic drink and have a second non-alcoholic beverage after you drink a cocktail or glass of wine.

Take the edge off your hunger before going to the party. There is usually no reason to pre-eat, which often results in eating too much overall. But if you feel uncomfortably hungry when you’re teased with an abundance of party food, you will likely find it hard to hold control.

It’s okay to enter a party with a normal appetite. But if you need a small snack first, choose something healthful and filling like an apple, an orange, or a glass of vegetable juice. At the party, take your first bites of lower-calorie foods like fresh fruits and veggies or steamed shrimp.

Be active. If dancing or playing games is part of the party, join in.

Bring a healthful dish to share. If you know you’ll be tempted by a table full of cakes, cookies, and glazed meatballs, opt to bring a healthier dish that you can share with the group, like a veggie tray with hummus or fruit skewers.

Distract yourself. Keep yourself occupied with conversation and other non-food activities.

Avoid the buffet. When you’ve had enough to eat, position yourself far from the food.

Remind yourself of your new habits. Remember that just because you’ve always indulged in party food, it doesn’t mean that you can’t change that.

OBSTACLE: Vacation Disrupts Your Healthy Routines

Vacation doesn’t mean that you should give yourself a free pass. Avoid the mentality that you deserve unhealthful eating because you’re on vacation. Really, no one deserves unhealthful eating. Everyone deserves to eat healthfully, and everyone deserves just a bit of not-so-nutritious food tossed into the mix for a little extra fun.

Pack food for the trip. If you are traveling by car, use a cooler and fill it with fruit, veggies, yogurt, low-fat cheese and cottage cheese, vegetable juice, hard-boiled eggs, and a turkey or tuna sandwich. Whether you have a cooler or not, you can still carry nuts, dried fruit, some fresh fruits and vegetables, peanut butter, whole-grain crackers, and granola bars or fiber-rich cereal bars.

Be prepared for plane travel. If you are traveling by plane, pack a small amount of perishable food in a plastic bag. Keep it cold with ice in a separate plastic bag. Airport security will probably want you to get rid of the ice before you go through screening. Once you’re through security, stop by a food vendor and kindly ask to refill your plastic bag with more ice.

Stock up on healthy choices. Once you’re at your destination, stock up on additional wholesome options. If you don’t have access to a refrigerator, keep a small amount of perishable food fresh with ice and an ice bucket. Or pack a collapsible vinyl cooler in your luggage for use while away.

Snack only on fruit.

Apples and bananas are great choices to carry in your purse or backpack. Or you can find fresh fruit at any grocery store and even at many convenience stores, gas stations, or coffee shops while you’re on the road.

Search for healthy dining options.

Ask locals for restaurant ideas and search menus online before going out to eat.

Walk whenever possible. Opt for a walking tour instead of a bus tour.

Stay hydrated. Carry a refillable water bottle and be sure to sip from it frequently.

Find a local gym. You may be able to get in a gym workout even while on vacation. Call around to gyms in the area where you’ll be staying and ask if they have any weekly membership offers. Or stay in a hotel that has a gym.

Decide in advance what amount of treats is reasonable for you.

Is it a glass of wine a day? A couple of desserts over the week? Create your rules and exceptions, so you have a working blueprint to follow.

By using some of these tips when you find yourself facing one of these common obstacles, you can help guard yourself against a full-blown relapse and protect your health.

If you do have some setbacks along the way, shake them off. We all have them from time to time. Note them for what they are—little lapses that won’t have a big impact if they are few and far between. Recognize all the little changes you’ve made that add up to something bigger—better health and wellness. So pat yourself on the back and soldier on.

High Protein Diet May Increase Heart Failure Risk

For middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein, according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. Proteins from fish and eggs were not associated with heart failure risk in this study. The findings were reported in Circulation: Heart Failure.

Despite the popularity of high protein diets, there is little research about how diets high in protein might impact men’s heart failure risk.

“As many people seem to take the health benefits of high-protein diets for granted, it is important to make clear the possible risks and benefits of these diets,” said Jyrki Virtanen, PhD, study author and an adjunct professor of nutritional epidemiology at the University of Eastern Finland in Kuopio. “Earlier studies have linked diets high in protein – especially from animal sources — with increased risks of type 2 diabetes and even death.”

Researchers studied 2,441 men, age 42 to 60, at the study’s start and followed them for an average 22 years. Overall, researchers found 334 cases of heart failure were diagnosed during the study and 70 percent of the protein consumed was from animal sources and 27.7 percent from plant sources. Higher intake of protein from most dietary sources, was associated with slightly higher risk. Only proteins from fish and eggs were not associated with heart failure risk in this study, researchers said.

For this study, researchers divided the men into four groups based on their daily protein consumption. When they compared men who ate the most protein to those who ate the least, they found their risk of heart failure was:

• 33 percent higher for all sources of protein;

• 43 percent higher for animal protein;

• 49 percent higher for dairy protein;

• 17 percent higher for plant protein.

“As this is one of the first studies reporting on the association between dietary protein and heart failure risk, more research is needed before we know whether moderating protein intake may be beneficial in the prevention of heart failure,” said Heli E.K. Virtanen, MSc, first author of study, PhD student and early career researcher at the University of Eastern Finland in Kuopio. “Long-term interventions comparing diets with differential protein compositions and emphasizing differential protein sources would be important to reveal possible effects of protein intake on risk factors of heart failure. More research is also needed in other study populations.”

The Finnish Cultural Foundation North Savo Regional fund, Päivikki and Sakari Sohlberg Foundation, Paavo Nurmi Foundation and The Finnish Association of Academic Agronomists funded the study.

For further information, please contact:

Heli Virtanen, MHSc, early stage researcher, University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, tel. +358 400 419477, heli.e.virtanen@uef.fi

Jyrki Virtanen, PhD, adjunct professor, University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, tel. +358 294454542, jyrki.virtanen@uef.fi

Emotional Eating Contributing to Your Prediabetes?

Here Are Eight ADA-Approved Techniques to Break This Dangerous Habit

If you’ve got prediabetes, it’s time to adopt healthier eating habits. But emotional eating is one habit that could derail your progress and put you further at risk. Jill Weisenberger, author of Prediabetes: A Complete Guide, offers tips to help you stop emotional eating today.

Arlington, VA (May 2018)—If you’ve been diagnosed with prediabetes or have been told that you’re at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, you already know you’ve got to change your eating habits. But overhauling your diet is anything but easy—especially when you’re feeling hurt, sad, mad, lonely, or aggravated. If you turn to food when you’re stressed or unhappy, you could be damaging your health with emotional eating.

“Plenty of people who try to adopt healthier eating habits often find themselves waylaid by emotional eating,” says Jill Weisenberger, who partnered with the American Diabetes Association to write Prediabetes: A Complete Guide: Your Lifestyle Reset to Stop Prediabetes and Other Chronic Illnesses (American Diabetes Association, May 2018, ISBN: 978-1-580-40674-1, $16.95). “Digging into a carton of ice cream or bag of chips when you’re feeling down can quickly derail your health goals. And for the 84 million American adults with prediabetes, emotional eating can be especially dangerous to your health.”

Weisenberger says it can be hard to break the habit of emotional eating, because psychology and biology are both at play. People reach for “feel-good” foods like Mom’s cookies or a cheesy casserole. Additionally, stress hormones crank up the appetite, and eating releases the brain’s feel-good chemicals. Often, a psychotherapist skilled in working with people with disordered eating is the ideal person to help you. Ask your healthcare provider for a referral if you think a psychotherapist can help you.

Despite these challenges, you can learn to stop emotional eating with practice and diligence. Are you ready to break free of emotional eating and move one step closer to reclaiming your health? Here are a few techniques that may help you on your journey.

Keep a log. Record your food intake for a week or two. Track what you’re eating along with your mood. This process may help you find choice points in which you can learn to change your thinking and behavior and teach you to identify your breaking points long before you break.

“Consider keeping a photo log,” suggests Weisenberger. “If you’re about to eat, snap a picture. Do this for a week to see in color the choices you’ve been making.”

Notice and label your emotions. Having negative emotions isn’t usually bad. In fact, having negative emotions is actually normal. But taking a deep dive into a bag of salty, crunchy snacks because of negative emotions is unhelpful in the long run.

“Practice noticing and labeling your emotions,” says Weisenberger. “Are you sad, anxious, lonely, or mad? Naming them and observing them without judgment will help you learn about them. Many people find that journaling about their emotions is helpful.”

Imagine handling emotional situations. In your mind, practice responding to common triggers in ways that don’t lead you to overeating. Think about what you can do next time you feel overwhelmed with household chores or the next time you argue with your spouse or whatever situation leads you to eat emotionally. Over and over in your mind, practice acting in desirable ways. “Here again,” says Weisenberger, “many people find journaling enlightening and empowering.”

Create a plan. After imagining responding in positive ways, create a plan for difficult situations. If you need distractions, gather things to help you, such as puzzle books, adult coloring books, nail polish, a list of people to call, or a list of activities such as soaking in a bath or playing with your dog.

“If you know that exercise or meditation help you cope with strong emotions, plan to take at least five minutes for meditation or exercise,” says Weisenberger. “You may need more than one plan to address various situations.”

Practice non-food coping skills. Regularly soothe yourself without calories. Every day, take time for soothing enjoyment, so when the time comes, you have an arsenal of coping strategies at the ready. Some ideas include taking deep-breathing breaks, using adult coloring books, writing in a journal, listening to soothing or uplifting music, chatting with a friend, buying yourself flowers, or soaking in a hot tub.

“I regularly play with my dog, Benny, a perpetual puppy,” says Weisenberger. “I also call and text my daughters, spend quiet time drinking tea or coffee with my husband, take five-minute breaks outside, and sit alone sipping a warm and fragrant tea from a beautiful cup. How you choose to soothe yourself is as individual as you are.”

Adopt a morning ritual. A morning ritual potentially has the power to affect your entire day. A ritual is different from a routine in that a ritual holds a deeper meaning. A few examples are:

• Express gratitude in thoughts, a journal, or aloud.

• Reaffirm your goals in writing or aloud.

• Practice yoga, meditation, or prayer.

• Watch a sunrise.

• Visualize good things happening in your day.

• Recite affirmations or a mantra.

Build in food treats. Whatever food you reach for in times of stress probably has some special meaning to you. Is it chocolate, macaroni and cheese, pizza, or hot-from-the-oven cookies? Whatever it is, be sure to have some now and then. Not as a reward, but simply because you like the way it tastes. Practice enjoying this favorite food in a reasonable amount, perhaps as part of a balanced meal. Simply removing a food’s taboo label can be helpful. In this way, you are learning that it’s okay to treat yourself and removing the notion of treats as cheats. We all deserve treats, but cheat days are the wrong mindset.

Create a personal wellness vision and review it often. A personal wellness vision is a concrete and motivating picture of you being healthy, feeling healthy, and living a healthful life. Imagine yourself at your ideal level of well-being. How do you feel? Look? Act? Write down what this looks like for you. This vision will help you identify what is important to you.

“After creating your vision, be sure to regularly look it over! It’s easy to forget what really matters when you’re under stress or running in crisis mode. But knowing—and remembering—what’s really important steers you to appropriate actions.”

“Reaching for food to manage your emotions can be a very hard habit to break,” concludes Weisenberger. “Become aware of times when you look to food to soothe you, calm you down, or help you avoid your feelings. When you recognize that you’ve been eating with your emotions, you can change the behavior and continue striving toward your health goals.”

You can visit Jill Weisenberger’s website here

The True Story

The True Story About Organic Meat

Company Teams Up With Registered Dieticians And Food Experts To

Help Consumers Make Ethical and Nutritious Choices About Protein

True Story, makers of organic and Project Non-GMO Certified sausages, hot dogs, deli meats, and fresh pork have partnered with registered dieticians and food experts Regina Ragone and Elizabeth Fassberg to educate consumers and retailers about the health benefits of organic and non-GMO meats.

Regina Ragone, MS, RD, former food director at Family Circle, food editor of Prevention and author of Meals That Heal and Elizabeth Fassberg, MPH, RD and CDN, the owner of the food and nutrition consultancy Eat Food who has partnered with Dr. Oz’s HealthCorps and Jamie Oliver. Ragone and Fassberg have spent years counseling food lovers and food creators to improve lives through making better choices about their food.

WhOrganic Apple & Wildflower Honey Chicken Sausageile plant based alternatives are gaining in popularity, the majority of Americans are still eating meat every day.” adds Ragone.

“If we can guide them to make better choices about the meat they choose to eat, we can have a huge impact on their diet and their lives,” says Faasberg.

Animal protein sources, such as lean meats like True Story, are similar to the protein found in your body. These protein sources are considered to be complete sources of protein because they contain all of the essential amino acids that your body needs to function effectively. Plant protein sources, such as beans, lentils and nuts are considered to be incomplete, since they lack one or more of the essential amino acids that your body needs,” says Regina Ragone RD.

Lean animal protein contains several nutrients lacking in plant based protein. These essential nutrients include: heme-iron which is much better absorbed in the body than non-heme iron from plant-based protein; vitamin B12 which is only found in animal protein, it is an essential nutrient needed to help your body make red blood cells and keep the brain and nervous system healthy and zinc which is essential for growth and helps the immune system work properly. Zinc is mostly found and better absorbed and used from animal protein sources,” adds Elizabeth Faasberg RD.

The pair have created tips and recipes to help consumers find healthy and humanely raised proteins to add to their everyday meals now available here.

Here are some helpful tips when choosing proteins in your diet from Ragone and Faasberg:

· For a satisfying afternoon snack try a slice of True Story Organic Uncured Applewood Smoked Ham or Organic Oven Roasted Turkey Breast, a couple of whole grain crackers and a slice of apple. Protein plays a key role in regulating your hunger hormone so eating a protein-rich snack helps you to feel more satisfied between meals.*

· Start your day with a hearty balanced breakfast — to boost the flavor add True Story Organic Apple & Wildflower Honey Chicken Sausage and some greens to your omelet and don’t forget a piece of fruit to top it off! People tend to get most of their protein during evening meals and the least at breakfast. Moving some protein from dinner to breakfast can help with weight management by decreasing hunger and cravings throughout the day. **

· Choosing organic can make it simpler to know more about how your food is raised. Organic meats are raised without GMOs, pesticides, and chemical fertilizers. The foods cannot contain synthetic preservatives.

Check out the newly created recipes by Ragone and Fassberg such as Homemade Colorful Cole Slaw Made with Thick Cut Oven Roasted Chicken Breast, Banh Mi Vietnamese Sandwich made with Pasture Raised Uncured Beef Hot Dogs; and Wheat Berry, Toasted Walnut, Broccoli and Organic Sweet Italian Chicken Sausage at www.truestoryfoods.com/recipes.

True Story’s all-natural line-up offers both Organic and Project Non-GMO Certified varieties. True Story offers a wide range of products such as:

· Organic Thick Cut Oven Roasted Chicken Breast – A 2017 Expo East Nexty Winner

· Organic Apple & Wildflower Honey Chicken Sausage

· Organic Uncured Applewood Smoked Ham

· Organic Grass Fed Beef Hot Dogs

True Story believes in a future of food that is a return to what is real and true and a future that is respectful of the sources of our food – the soil, the animals, and the farmers.

True Story is Committed to:

Supporting Farmers with Good Farming Practices

True Story practices fair trade with farmers, ensuring that the animals are raised humanely and without antibiotics, and creating a sustainable livelihood for generations of farmers to come. All animals are fed an all-vegetarian diet, never given antibiotics or growth enhancers, and live without undue stress or agitation.

Crafting Real Foods

All of True Story recipes are crafted in our California Kitchens with artisan methods used for three generations: hand seasoning and netting of roasted turkeys and hams, using traditional all-natural casings, and hand tying sausage links. Our foods never contain synthetic nitrates or nitrites.

Provoking Honest Conversation

True Story shares the story of their animals, farmers, and communities to provoke honest conversation about how food is raised and prepared. We believe that informing and educating food lovers helps them to make better choices for them and their families.

About True Story:

All True Story foods are crafted using artisan methods to allow the real ingredients to stand out. Made at family-owned and operated kitchens and farms, the delicious meats include organic and Project Non-GMO Certified varieties. True Story offers a wide range of products such as Organic Chicken Sausages; Organic Uncured Grass Fed Beef Hot Dogs and Organic Sliced Deli Meats.

True Story is available nationally in select natural and traditional grocery retailers and Costco. For more information, visit here.

*Source : *A good deal of evidence suggests that protein activates satiety hormone release and so should be most strongly tied with fullness ratings,” said lead investigator Richard D. Mattes, MPH, PhD, RD, Distinguished Professor, Department of Nutrition Science, Director of Public Health, and Director of the Ingestive Behavior Research Center at Purdue University, “but individual studies are often conducted in small populations or with different approaches that can make interpretation of results challenging. Our study combined multiple experiments to confirm the presence of an effect.”

**Source : * Leidy HJ, Bossingham MJ, Mattes RD, Campbell WW. Increased dietary protein consumed at breakfast leads to an initial and sustained feeling of fullness during energy restriction compared to other meal times. Br J Nutr. 2009;101(6):798-203.

Heartland Institute Experts React to FDA

The advisory panel to the Food and Drug Administration voted 5-to-4 to reject a claim from Philip Morris International Inc. that “Switching completely to IQOS presents less risk of harm than continuing to smoke cigarettes.” Phillip Morris claims that using their IQOS device, which heats tobacco rather than burn it, could reduce the risk of tobacco related health issues compared to cigarettes.

“How many more smokers will have to die on the FDA’s watch until they catch up to the rest of the world when it comes to supporting harm reduction technologies?” Director of Government Relations John Nothdurft said. “The rest of  the world is far ahead of the United States in terms of supporting policies that help smokers quit or at a minimum move to less harmful alternatives such as heat-not-burn products, e-cigarettes, and snus.”

Winter Soup Cleanse

Everyone resolves to lose weight, eat better, work out more, etc etc in the new year.  But no one actually follows through!

Now you can do something that’s great for your physical health that tastes delicious and won’t leave you feeling deprived. The ladies from Wear Your Wellness, who created their hydration challenge to reinforce the benefits of staying hydrated, have now come up with a soup cleanse for you to start your new year off right!

The reasons a soup cleanse is so beneficial?

  • Stay hydrated with warm liquids
  • Give your system a break after the holidays with easy to digest soups
  • Pack in more nutrients per serving to boost your immunity during cold and flu season
  • Adds more fiber to your diet to clean your pipes and bust belly bloat
  • Soup recipes are easy to make, easy to store for multiple meals

Six Senses

Six Senses Hotels Resorts Spas to Launch Eat With Six Senses

An approach to food where guests leave feeling better than when they arrived

BANGKOK – December 14, 2017 – Pick up your forks and rejoice. Eating and holidays go hand in hand, and now guests can enjoy both without derailing their health goals thanks to fresh whole food that is nutritious and delicious.

Eat With Six Senses represents another pillar of the Six Senses Integrated Wellness philosophy focusing on food and drink. It is based on the guiding principles of natural ingredients, local and sustainable, and less is more, helping guests to reconnect with food safe in the knowledge that it’s good for them, and good for the world around them.

Natural ingredients
Six Senses chooses a cleaner and simpler approach to preparation, focusing on quality, balance and fresh whole food made from scratch. Chefs indulge their love for hearty and healthy menus full of color, taste and joy, while unapologetically avoiding the bad stuff (flavor enhancers, lectins, lactose, gluten and sugar). Instead they choose the ingredients and preparation methods that promote a healthy microbiome (the trillions of tiny gut buddies living in the body) to offer better digestion and absorption of nutrients while boosting the immune system. Glucose is out, fermenting is in!

Local and sustainable
It is essential to know what’s in food and where it’s from, and each Six Senses resort is reinforcing its relationships with local farmers, producers and suppliers, who are committed to responsible sourcing and seasonality. Imported seafood could be farm raised with antibiotics and growth hormones. By working closely with local producers, Six Senses is assuring that ethical practices in raising animals and avoiding at-risk species are adhered to.

Even closer to home, each Six Senses resort cultivates its own organic vegetable garden, one property already has its own free-range chicken farm to supply fresh eggs and two resorts have established mushroom huts.

Less is more
Produce that has traveled a long distance is often gassed, irradiated and preserved with wax or exposed to toxic packaging. At Six Senses, the energy footprint of importing branded drinking water has been eliminated with each resort having its own reverse osmosis plant to produce top quality still and sparkling mineralized water, which is provided to guests in reusable glass bottles.

As deep as people want to go
Guests who typically vacation at Six Senses tend to eat healthier by default. For guests who are curious about Eat With Six Senses and want to discover more about the food and beverage offerings, fitness and wellness activities, they will have the basics for making life changes. While guests who opt for the full Integrated Wellness, including a personalized wellness screening, will reap the total immersion benefits: from fitness plans to Sleep With Six Senses, the wellness experience can be integrated into every aspect of their stay.

Six Senses Integrated Wellness was developed in collaboration with Dr. Steven Gundry, Dr. Michael Breus, Dr. Mehmet Oz and Patrick Wahlberg, members of Six Senses Wellness Board, highly respected doctors and leading wellness professionals.

According to Dr. Steven Gundry, American cardiac surgeon and founder of The Center for Restorative Medicine, “With the introduction of Eat With Six Senses, guests not only eat well, they feel better. They are also supported with valuable tools and information to help them make positive lasting life adjustments. To put it in a nutshell, Six Senses want guests to leave feeling better than when they arrived.”

Eat With Six Senses will also have a positive outcome for the resort’s hosts, as the philosophy will be implemented in all employee dining outlets. It will create an internal culture of health and wellness through healthier meal choices as well as provide knowledge to support the well-being of hosts and their families.

Eat With Six Senses will have a positive effect on guests, hosts and Mother Nature alike.