Posts tagged with "nutrition"

Kate’s Real Food , 360 MAGAZINE

Kate’s Real Food

‘Delicious and nutritious’ 360 MAGAZINE

In the late 1990’s, looking to fuel her backcountry adventures, Kate Schade, a self-described ski bum living in Jackson Hole, WY. went searching for an energy bar that was wholesome, functional and also great tasting. To her surprise, she was unable to find a solution in the marketplace. 

So, Kate decided to solve the problem herself. With her own hands, in her own kitchen. In doing so, she realized she was on to something and began sharing her product within lift lines and on the trails. Unlike other energy bars, Kate’s Bars keep their soft texture in cold temperatures, making them easy to consume on the chairlift or in the backcountry. 

Today, Kate’s Real Food makes six delicious, hand-rolled flavors of energy bars with a great-taste guarantee and no artificial sweeteners.  From the Peanut Butter Milk Chocolate Tram Bar, to the Dark Chocolate Cherry Almond Handle Bar, each one is certified organic, gluten free, non-GMO, and Kosher. 

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

The Secret Code to Resetting Your Body’s Inner Clock

By Cynthia Li, MD

“Our modern lifestyle is disrupting a deeply ingrained, primordial, and universal code to being healthy.” This is how Dr. Satchin Panda, a professor at the Salk Institute in San Diego and a researcher on circadian rhythms, begins his book, The Circadian Code. His statement is backed by a compelling body of research.

In 2012, Dr. Panda’s team divided genetically identical mice into 2 groups, one with unlimited access to a high fat-diet, and another with access to the same diet but whose eating was restricted to an 8-hour window (during that 8-hour window, however, the second group could eat as often as they wanted). The total caloric intake per day ended up being the same in both groups.  

The surprise: despite the same total caloric intake, the mice that ate within the time restriction showed no signs of disease often seen with a poor diet. No weight gain, diabetes, elevated cholesterol levels, fatty liver, or elevated markers of inflammation.  

In 2014, Dr. Panda’s team took it further. They divided genetically identical mice into 4 groups based on 4 different diets: high fat, high fructose, high fat and high sucrose (table sugar), and regular mouse kibble. Each of these groups had unrestricted eaters as well as those with time restrictions. Again, the caloric intake per day for all the mice ended up being the same. 

The result: the unrestricted eaters across the 4 groups tended to be obese with blood sugar, cholesterol, and inflammatory disorders, while those that ate within a 9- or 12-hour window stayed healthy, even if the latter “cheated” on the weekends. 

The purpose of these studies isn’t to condone a poor diet, but to stress the impacts of circadian rhythms on health and disease. Paying attention to when we eat seems to be a missing piece in the discussion of food, whether the goal is weight loss, more energy, or general health.  

What Exactly is the Circadian Clock?

The circadian clock is a biological rhythm found in plants, animals, and humans, closely aligned with the 24-hour day. This clock is influenced by our external environments—largely the exposure to light and dark—but is also controlled internally by our genes. Each organ has a set of genes that turn on, then turn off, at various times of the day and night. And though our environments have changed dramatically over the past century with artificial lighting and digital gadgets, our physiology remains largely the same today as it did two million years ago. In other words, there’s a mismatch between our internal clocks and stimuli from our modern lifestyle.    

Many of us know about the circadian rhythm, or have at least experienced it, in terms of jet lag.  Jet lag happens in part because melatonin, a brain chemical that dictates our sleep-wake cycles, gets disrupted by changes in the light-dark cycles when we cross time zones. But since each organ has its own internal clock, the liver is thrown off, too. And the digestive tract. And the lungs, the kidneys, and so on, through every organ. It takes on average 1 day for every hour of time change for the body to adjust.  

Why This Matters

When we deviate from our internal clocks, it creates added stress on the body. And stress, when perpetual and cumulative, can make us more vulnerable to chronic disease. Disrupted rhythms have been correlated with insomnia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, anxiety, migraines, diabetes, obesity, dementia, and cardiovascular disease. On the flip side, aligning with our clocks can optimize function, and optimizing function means improving health. 

The Good News

Getting back in sync is relatively easy. We can optimize our clocks in just a few weeks. Based on the rhythms of insulin, digestion, and sleep, you can try the following:

  1. Eat a big breakfast. Don’t skip it! This sets the clocks for the other organs.
  2. Eat a medium-sized lunch. Drink 1-2 glasses of water between meals for a greater sense of fullness, or healthy snacks in between are fine, too.
  3. Eat a small dinner. The earlier the better. If you want to skip one meal a day, it’s best to skip dinner.  
  4. Nothing to eat or drink after dinner (water and herbal teas are okay).

Research suggests to repair, reset, and rejuvenate, it’s best to have a fasting window of 12 hours or more (EX: 8:00 am-8:00 pm, or -6:00 pm for the more ambitious). Our bodies need this window as much as our brains do.

Time-restricted eating isn’t about counting calories; it’s being mindful and disciplined about timing. 

*If you have chronic fatigue or moderate-severe diabetes, short-term or intermittent fasting may not be optimal, and might worsen your symptoms. It’s best for these conditions to work with an integrative doctor or functional nutritionist. 

A Few Last Tidbits

—Our bodies can’t make and break up body fat at the same time. Every time we eat, the fat-making program turns on and the body aims to store it. The fat-burning genes only turn on a few hours after the food stops coming in.  

—Gut motility increases during the day and slows down at night. So when we eat late, indigestion, insomnia, and weight gain are more likely.  

—The gut’s microbiome (the bacteria, viruses, and yeast that aid in digestion, absorption, and overall health) is affected by our internal rhythms.  

The take-home

—The better you can stick to regular eating intervals, the easier on your body.  

—A twelve-hour overnight window can have major benefits for your overall health.

—Eat real foods with lots of vegetables of different kinds, and keep the processed foods to a minimum.

—Try this for 30 days and see how you feel. 

—To be in sync with the internal and external rhythms of your body can do your body right.

Dr. Cynthia Li, MD, is an integrative and functional medicine practitioner in Berkeley, CA. She serves as faculty on the Healer’s Art Program at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine. She is the author of Brave New Medicine: A Doctor’s Unconventional Path to Healing Her Autoimmune Illness. 

CBD, Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

Why You Should Add CBD To Your Skincare

Cannabidiol, also known as CBD, gets a lot of attention for treating chronic conditions such as pain, anxiety, insomnia, even seizures. And while it does offer health benefits, you shouldn’t overlook CBD’s potential for beauty benefits, too.

CBD in skincare can offer a solution for inflammatory skin conditions, support for sensitive skin, and a way to fight the signs of aging. It’s a natural, plant based product that can help your skin.

What is CBD?

CBD is a cannabinoid derived from the cannabis plant. Cannabis is known for another popular cannabinoid, THC, but unlike THC, CBD won’t get you high.

It works as an anti inflammatory and antibacterial tool, and can offer a host of benefits for your skin when used topically:

  • Rejuvenation
  • Brightening
  • Smoothing wrinkles
  • Relief for dry skin
  • Soothing sunburned skin

CBD is available in a variety of skincare products. You may see CBD in products such as:

  • Moisturizers
  • Lotions
  • Body creams
  • Facial serums
  • Masks
  • Face creams
  • Cleansers
  • Exfoliants
  • Soaps
  • Body wash
  • Eye serums
  • Eye creams

How Does CBD Help Skin?

Offering anti-inflammatory properties, CBD can calm your skin and can treat skin imbalances. That means it may be a good choice for conditions such as acne, eczema, dry skin, psoriasis, or sun damage.

CBD oil is rich in antioxidants, and has vitamins B, C, and E. It also offers healing fats omega 3 and omega 6. Some skincare products combine CBD with other skin soothing ingredients such as shea butter and aloe vera.

What to Know About Using CBD For Skincare

CBD products are legal at the federal level. However, some states have their own restrictions on CBD, so it’s a good idea to check before you start using CBD.

Look for products with hemp oil. Hemp oil has CBD in it, coming from the buds and flowers of the hemp plant.

Be careful to keep in mind the CBD is somewhat of a beauty buzzword, and while you might find it on the label of many products, that doesn’t necessarily mean it offers the full potential of CBD. You’ll want to know how much CBD a product has, and the quality of the CBD. The product should be independently tested for purity.

Find out how much CBD the product has. Look for a third party testing certificate that indicates the amount of CBD and other compounds in the oil. Ideally, you should look for CBD skincare products with 25mg to 250 mg of CBD per ounce.

A little goes a long way. You don’t have to replace your entire skincare routine all at once with CBD. It’s enough to pick a few key items here and there. For example, it could be helpful to replace your night serum with a CBD version, or swap out your body wash.

If you’re curious about using CBD skincare products, consider what might be the most helpful for you. Look for products that can support healthy skin both with and without CBD, and take care to consider product quality, purity, and potency.

Amelia Noble is a researcher with the CBD Awareness Project. When she’s not working, you can find her playing board games. 

LA Times, The Taste 2019, The Taste LA, Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

LA Times The Taste

By Vaughn Lowery × Krish Narsinghani

The Taste LA‘s 10th anniversary didn’t disappoint. Held at the legendary Paramount Studios on Gower and Melrose in Hollywood. Opening night was nothing short of whimsical. Canopy lights draped the movie lot as people pranced throughout the evening with sips and bite-sized dishes in tow. The soon-to-be iconic event is hosted by the LA Times. If you’re seeking a savory night out with influential foodies, then this is your place.

Throughout the three day experience, various restaurants rotated booths to serve small bites and spirits. 360 Magazine favorites included Castaway, McConnel’s Fine Ice Creams and RiceBox. VIP ticket holders had access to an additional plethora of wines, lounge area and a personalized wine glass crafted by Signature Hand Engraving.

Ticket prices ranged from $115 to $200 USD for a VIP experience. Passes are all-inclusive and good for unlimited food, beer, wine and spirits tastings, plus all stage activities (including cooking demonstrations). The Taste 2019 left foodies satisfied and dreaming of LA’s hottest restaurants.

DISCOVER “VISION QUEST, a journey to happiness”

When corporate executive Jane Ramsey found herself facing sudden retirement, she embraced the opportunity to embark on a long-awaited metaphysical journey of discovery and profound reinvention. With one foot grounded in the rational world, and the other in the ether, she was free to pursue her lifelong dream of becoming an artist and wisdom-seeker. Experimenting with new mediums of painting and finding a connection with her deeper self, she yearned to better understand why we are here and what life is all about, further seeking guidance from spiritual teachers Deepak Chopra and Jean Houston.

Now with the release of VISION QUEST: a journey to happiness, she invites readers inside her spiritual ‘vision quest’ as she studies, travels, finds optimal health, deeper love and seeks answers to life’s mysteries, culminating with the realization that it’s an inside job––the answers are always available when we tap into our inner soul.

About the Author

Jane Ramsey spent thirty-six years in corporate life. Her last role was executive vice president of HR for a global retail enterprise. Upon retirement, Jane embarked on a course of study in philosophy, fitness, health,  nutrition, quantum physics, happiness and spirituality.

She is now an author, artist and certified  meditation teacher with the Deepak Chopra Center. She has been meditating for more than twenty years and helps clients create a strong daily meditation practice to help them feel more grateful, vital, energetic, peaceful, joyful and to develop great abundance and loving relationships in their lives.

Jane is currently developing a program combining meditation and art to help people live a more full-spectrum, creative and balanced life. She currently resides with her loving husband in Indian Wells, California.

Available on Amazon.com and bookstores.

SOCIAL MEDIA
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HueApproved Scanner

The Easy & Fun Way to Choose Healthy Products: NEW HueApproved Scanner

If you have ever found yourself looking at labels at the grocery store or online and trying to decide on the best product for you, our HueApproved Scanner will make it easy for you! 
Check out how it works here: 
Our philosophy is simple:
Food as Fuel to Color Your World.

We are a third party, unbiased, wanting to help you make the best lifestyle choices!

We love simple. Easy home cooked meals. Lots of colorful fruits and vegetables. Nutritious products with clean labels. But cutting a pathway through the clutter can be hard work and we need your help.

Nutrients are important. Using the nutrition label or recipe analysis, we check protein, fiber, sodium, sugar, and saturated fat.

Ingredients are important. We look for recipes developed by our HueChefs made with whole minimally processed ingredients and we look for packaged foods with fewer additives.

Behaviors are important. Making time to cook at home is best but we know you need other more convenient options.

And finally the pattern is important. At the end of a day, it’s the sum total of individual choices that determines the pattern. The more variety you bring into your day, the better.

So we envisioned a pattern for a good food day based on nutrients, ingredients, and behaviors. Then we developed a tool to assess how well a product or a recipe compares to that pattern on a scale of 1 to 7.

We sum the scores to get a final value between 1 and 7. The higher the number, the more we approveand we need your help to test it out for us!

To test our tool, please go to:

https://hueapproved.com/scanner/

Please let us know what you think and share with your friends!!!

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA FOR LIVE EVENTS AND PROMOTIONS:

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/HueTrition

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PINTEREST: https://www.pinterest.com/HueTrition/

HueTrition™ is a nationally-recognized family wellness program that utilizes cutting-edge technologies to promote a balanced, and active lifestyle that includes a daily variety of colorful fruits and vegetables from an early age while encouraging sensible choices for the planet.

Another New Platform!

HueLive Promo video– 

https://youtu.be/Y25pjd2ycT0

How To Make Healthy Fun & Simple: Personal Chef & Nutrition Expert Online

Ever wondered what it would be like to have your own personal chef and nutrition expert a your place? Check out our new HueTrition Live online space where you can contact experts, attend health & wellness support groups, see healthy culinary events with our Chefs, take online classes & reach your goals all in one! To book your private online session, please visit:

https://huetrition.com/shop/

What can we do to help you achieve your health & wellness goals in 2019? What sort of content would you like to start seeing from us? 

Please comment below any suggestions, or if you have any questions or would like to ask about HueTrition Live, please e-mail us at info@huetrition.com.       

To sign up for any of our Live Events or to have a conversation with our experts, please visit:

https://huetrition.com/shop/

You can get our nee HueTrition ebook How to Make Healthy Fun & Easy, a roadmap to a colorful plant-based diet with link below:

https://huetrition.com/resources/

To Read Full HueApproved Hue Launch Story, please visit:

https://huetrition.com/blog/2019/04/19/introducing-the-hueapproved-scanner/

How to Reduce Belly Fat

Top 5 tips by Registered Dietitian Ilana Muhlstein on how people can reduce belly fat for bathing suit season

  1. What are foods to eat to reduce belly fat?

Water filled veggies are great for helping you lose weight, and stay regular so you can relieve bloat. Some great examples are tomatoes, cucumbers and zucchinis that are rich in potassium, which can also help release water retention you may be carrying in your stomach.

  1. What are some foods to avoid?

Research has shown that cortisol, our stress hormone, can cause abdominal weight gain. Meaning that if you are stress eating, you will likely not just gain weight, but gain it in your lower stomach. Therefore, it is a good idea to ab-void stress eating in general and find better coping strategies for dealing with stress. Examples are calling a friend, taking a walk or long shower, doing yoga or another workout, meditating and/or journaling.
And the foods we reach for when stressed are typically higher in fat, refined carbohydrates, and sugar, which can be addictive and lead to excess weight gain. Therefore, it is a good idea to keep these trigger foods out of sight and out of mind, and not buy and bring them home, especially during stressful times.

  1. How to keep belly fat off for good?

Clear the counter tops of sliced bread, jars of cookies, bowls of candies, and boxes of cereal. And replace it with great things that can be helpful immediately if feeling hungry like a water cooler, boxes of cherry tomatoes (my daughter reaches into these daily for a quick snack), and a bowl of apples. You should also have things out that keep you thinking about your healthy lifestyle. Some examples are a tea or coffee station; some veggies that need cooking like spaghetti squash, turnips, and onions; and a Shakeology or smoothie station (if there is still room).

  1. What are your favorite core-flattening recipes?

I like to make a chocolate Shakeology shake with half a cup of water, half a cup of coconut water, ice, and a scoop each of the Shakeology Power Greens and Digestive Health Boosts. This recipe tastes like delicious chocolate ice cream, but is only 250 calories. It also has 20g of protein which helps stave off hunger and cravings, and 13g of fiber which helps keep you regular, (because constipation is definitely not “core flattering”).

  1. How do you limit sugar intake?

I always keep a little “mommy drawer” that contains mint gum in the kitchen. I find that if someone is craving chocolate, brushing his teeth with mint toothpaste could crush that craving. And chewing gum makes it really hard to also chew a mouthful of pasta or teriyaki beef stir fry.
Also the PB& J sandwich swapped for a PB&J Wonder Whip. In a bowl, add plain Greek yogurt, powdered peanut butter, and honey or stevia to taste. Whip it up very well, and top with sliced grapes or strawberries.

For additional professional opinions on this topic, we highly recommend visiting Dr. Michael Ruscio’s blog (and also downloading his latest book, Healthy Gut, Healthy You).

360, 360 Magazine, Vaughn Lowery, Ilana Muhlstein

2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee

Members of the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee Announced

Scientific Experts Will Review Scientific Evidence on Key Nutrition Topics To Inform Development of New Guidelines

To ensure America’s dietary guidance reflects the latest science, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue and U.S. Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar today announced the appointment of 20 nationally recognized scientists to serve on the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. The independent advisory committee will review scientific evidence on topics and questions identified by the departments and will provide a report on their findings to the secretaries. Their review, along with public and agency comments, will help inform USDA and HHS’ development of the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs).

“USDA is committed to ensuring everything we do is data-driven and based in scientific facts, which is why this expert committee’s work in objectively evaluating the science is of the utmost importance to the departments and to this process,” said Secretary Perdue. “The committee will evaluate existing research and develop a report objectively, with an open mind.”

“The scientists we selected to serve on the committee are national leaders in the areas of nutrition and health,” said HHS Secretary Alex Azar. “HHS, USDA, and all Americans will benefit from the collective experience and expertise of the committee, which will conduct a rigorous examination of the scientific evidence on several diet-related health outcomes, including the prevention of cancer, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, which are three of the leading causes of death in the United States.”

The list of members appointed to the expert committee can be found here.

The committee’s work will kick off at a public meeting to be announced in the coming weeks. The committee will review scientific evidence on specific nutrition and health related topics and scientific questions that, for the first time, reflect both public comments and federal agency input. Throughout their deliberations, the public and other stakeholders will be encouraged to provide comments and feedback.

“In our continuing commitment to transparency and customer service, we invite the American public to engage in this process,” said Secretary Perdue. “We want to hear from everyone and all viewpoints. I encourage everyone with an interest to attend public meetings and to send comments through the Federal Register once the committee begins their work.”

The next edition of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans will continue to focus on dietary patterns of what Americans eat and drink as a whole, on average and over time, to help prevent disease and keep people healthy. Additionally, the review process will take a life-stage approach and will, for the first time, include pregnant women and children from birth to 24 months as mandated by the 2014 Farm Bill.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans are updated every five years and serve as the cornerstone of federal nutrition programs and policies, providing food-based recommendations to help prevent diet-related chronic diseases and promote overall health.

USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) works to reduce food insecurity and promote nutritious diets among the American people. The agency administers 15 nutrition assistance programs that leverage America’s agricultural abundance to ensure children and low-income individuals and families have nutritious food to eat. FNS also co-develops the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which provides science-based nutrition recommendations and serves as the cornerstone of federal nutrition policy. For information and links, go to DietaryGuidelines.gov.

The HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) provides leadership for disease prevention and health promotion initiatives on behalf of the HHS Secretary and as part of the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health. ODPHP co-develops the Dietary Guidelines for Americans with USDA and leads the development of Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. ODPHP also leads the Healthy People initiative, which sets evidence-based, 10-year national goals and objectives for improving the health of all Americans.

6 Choices to Make Your Mental & Physical Goals a Success in 2019

According to U.S. News, approximately 80% of resolutions fail by the second week in February. Why? Because dramatic and immediate changes are not sustainable long-term.

So this year, make 2019 not a year of resolutions or diets but one of incremental changes to instill habits that create real long-lasting results. Here are 6 tips:

Do What You Enjoy:

Commit to trying new things or even old things to remind yourself of what you enjoy. This is especially true for keeping active and fulfilling your body’s desire for movement and exercise. This can be taking frequent walks through nature, biking, dancing, hiking, or yoga. Start taking ballroom dancing lessons that you promised yourself you would try years ago. Take a barre method class where you can let your inner ballerina shine. Better yet, put that music on full blast while you are preparing dinner and dance like no one’s watching. It is not about perfection, it is about finding what you love to do and what brings a smile to your face, then it becomes fun and not something you want to do.

Add Things, Don’t Remove Them:

If your goal is to improve your nutrition to lose weight and improve your energy levels, try adding foods into your diet like vegetables. Find fun ways to prepare them to fit your taste buds. Often times if you start with a deprivation statement like, “I am going to stop eating all carbs,” then the only thing you will think about is carbs. When you introduce something new and start noticing the benefits of that change, then you are often inspired to move on to add the next change. Think addition not deprivation!

Stop Eating by 6pm:

If you want to encourage the body to burn fat for energy, stop eating by 6 or 7pm. This allows the body to put most of its energy into rejuvenating and restoring the body for the next day. It also gives the body all time it needs to use up all the sugar storage in the liver so then it can start burning the fat cells for needed energy.

Take 5 Minutes to Stop & Breathe:

If one of your goals is to start being more mindful or to simply start incorporating some relaxation techniques to help you react to stressful events with more ease then perhaps going from not meditating to promising to meditate every day for 45 minutes a day may be a bit overwhelming.

Try this simple strategy, wake up in the morning take a deep breath, record in a journal or on your phone one thing you are grateful for, appreciate or just makes you happy. Read it out loud and then follow with 5 slow breaths and really feel that joy. This way you are starting the habit and getting your body used to what relaxation and being in a state of gratitude feels like. During the day when things get hectic, pull out that book or play that recording and take 5 deep breaths. Fast, easy and often times very effective for decreasing the effects of those stress reactions.

Go to Bed 15 Minutes Earlier:

Work on getting a good night’s rest. A healthy amount of sleep helps you to be more alert, make better decisions, maintain a healthier weight and helps you to look and feel younger. Go to bed 15 minutes earlier each week for a month so you total an hour more of sleep. Remove all electronic devices in the bedroom that gives off artificial light and creating a bedtime routine that signals the body that it is time for bed.

Spend Your Time with Like-Minded People:

Make an effort to spend more quality time reconnecting with family or friends.  Individuals who have social connections suffer less symptoms of depression and may live longer healthier, lives. Also, establishing a support group can help to stay on track with our goals. This may look like once every two weeks to a month spending some time with your girlfriends or skyping or face timing them to catch up.

Making these gradual changes can help you to create habits that will help to feel more energized, feel less stressed, think more clearly and make better choices for you. With each choice comes the opportunity to be the person you have always envisioned.

Eudene Harry MD is the medical director for Oasis Wellness and Rejuvenation Center, a wellness practice devoted to integrative holistic care. She is a veteran physician with over 20 years of experience. Dr. Harry earned her medical degree and performed her residency at Thomas Jefferson University.

Dr. Harry is the author of three books designed to empower the individual to get started on their path to optimal health. She has published extensively on the topics of reducing stress, healthy lifestyle choices, and regaining youthfulness. Her most recent book, Be Iconic: Healthy and Sexy at Any Ageis now available on Amazon.

Rise in Obesity-Related Cancers

A new analysis, published in the Lancet Public Health, raises the alarm that the rates of obesity-related cancers are rising in younger and younger adults. In the new study, six of twelve types of obesity-related cancers have significantly increased between 1995-2014 and the risk of these cancers is increasing in each successive younger age group. These cancers include colorectal, pancreatic, gallbladder, kidney cancer and multiple myeloma (a type of blood cancer). These cancer types are particularly concerning because they are very serious and account for over 150,000 deaths in the U.S. every year.

“These numbers are worrying but not surprising; the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) recently sounded the alarm that having overweight and obesity cause at least 12 types of cancer. However, the younger and younger age bracket in which we see rates increasing is even more troubling and demands a response. We cannot just watch these rates go up and ignore the factors that we know are contributing to these increases,” says Dr. Nigel Brockton, Vice President of Research at AICR.

Disturbingly, over 70% of Americans have overweight or obesity according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And AICR maintains that cancer risk increases across each higher category of Body Mass Index (BMI) as an indicator of body fatness (Healthy = 18.5-24.9, Overweight = 25-29.9, and Obesity = 30 and above).

A mere five BMI points (kg/m2) separate the three basic (healthy, overweight, obese) BMI categories. It is important to emphasize that cancer risk is not limited to the extreme category of obesity only, the risk increases for those with overweight too. For example, compared to those having healthy BMI range overweight category face an increased liver cancer risk of 30% and those having obesity of 60%.

The recent AICR Energy Balance and Body Fatness Report presented strong evidence for factors that can reduce risk of having weight gain, overweight and obesity, including walking, aerobic physical activity, food containing fiber and a “Mediterranean-type” diets rich in fruits and vegetables that reduce the risk of weight gain, overweight and obesity. Conversely, sugar-sweetened drinks, fast foods and a “Western type” diet rich in meats and energy-dense proteins are strongly linked to increased weight gain, overweight and obesity.

The Report also points to the evidence that greater screen time is a cause of weight gain, overweight and obesity in children. This is particularly relevant in light of the Lancet study that discussed the onset of cancer at an early age, since children with overweight and obesity are likely to turn into young adults in a similar status. There is enormous opportunity to prevent future cancer cases, if changes can be made to stop and reverse the current trend of increasing overweight and obesity. In addition to helping individuals learn about healthy lifestyle choices, community and national policies play a crucial role in creating living spaces more conducive to physical activity and healthier food choices.

AICR is urging Congress and federal agencies to improve funding for cancer prevention research, ensure that federal nutrition and physical activity guidelines reflect the latest research regarding cancer risk, improve nutrition labeling and improve access to lifestyle interventions.