Posts tagged with "nonprofit"

A Voice for the Forgotten Minority

If foundations fall short on equality for people with disabilities, Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi puts them on the spot.
By Alex Daniels

A microphone in Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi’s hands is a powerful weapon. At venues across the country, Mizrahi has used her strong, clear voice to ask foundation leaders variations of one simple question: Why aren’t people with disabilities included?

As large foundations have placed more muscle behind programs that promote equity in terms of race, wealth, gender identity, and sexual orientation, Mizrahi believes people with disabilities have been overlooked.

During question-and-answer sessions at major foundation gatherings, she is the first with her hand up, ready to put foundation leaders on the spot. Why isn’t a foundation’s website accessible to the blind? she’ll ask. Or why isn’t data on disabled voters included on a conference speaker’s chart of voting patterns among residents of rural areas, African-Americans, and young people?

The reason for the neglect, she says, is that disability groups have too often come to foundations looking for charity. That strategy is rooted in the idea that donors should take pity on people who are blind, have dwarfism, or are intellectually challenged, she says, rather than treating discrimination against them as a violation of their civil rights.

“The overall messages of the disability community caused us more harm than good,” she says. “The more they were repeated, the more harm was done.”

Through RespectAbility, an organization she co-founded five years ago, and through her own philanthropy, Mizrahi has pushed to eliminate stigmatization and to reduce barriers to employment for people with disabilities.

Sometimes her approach is direct, such as when she called Darren Walker, president of the Ford Foundation, a “hypocrite” in an email for not including disabilities in the grant maker’s shift to focus entirely on equity. After that, and with the input of lots of others in addition to Mizrahi, Walker issued a mea culpa and announced that Ford would work to address inequalities based on disability throughout all of its programs. Mizrahi now calls Ford’s response the “gold standard.”

Donn Weinberg, executive vice president of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation and co-founder of RespectAbility, said Mizrahi is “fearless” in asking difficult questions of foundation honchos. When she’s able to get face-to-face with philanthropy executives at conferences, she seizes the opportunity to educate them about disability issues.

Private Consultations

Some nonprofit leaders grumble privately that Mizrahi sometimes claims credit for efforts that were already underway. And sometimes her questions come in the form of short lectures.

At a Philanthropy Roundtable conference in 2017, the group’s staff asked Weinberg, who also serves as Philanthropy Roundtable’s chairman, if he could persuade Mizrahi to tone down her rhetoric and get to the point. “She clearly wants people to hear a bit of commentary before the question,” he says. “She’s planting seeds of thought and bringing to people’s consciousness an issue they often don’t think about.”

But Mizrahi doesn’t see herself as a provocateur or a grandstander. She consults directly with nonprofit leaders to make sure their websites, grant applications, and program strategies benefit and are accessible to people with disabilities.

She’s created a set of guidelines and tools for organizations that want to gauge whether they are being inclusive. And she dispatches young professionals and students working as RespectAbility fellows to interview foundation employees about how they communicate with, employ, and benefit the disabled population.

“We try to call people aside and not call them out,” she insists, saying most of her work is done in private consultations with foundation leaders, not in the public spotlight. “I like to see myself as a partner, a facilitator, and a resource.”

Aaron Dorfman knows from experience.

Mizrahi said her annual-dues statement from Dorfman’s group, the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy, sold the organization as a social-justice champion — but something was missing.

“They were very proud to send me a 12-page, single-spaced memo on diversity, equity, and inclusion,” she says. “The word ‘disability’ wasn’t in it.”

The two met for coffee to discuss the matter. Afterward, as the committee was preparing to release a guide for foundations interested in social justice, Dorfman asked Mizrahi to analyze a draft to make sure it adequately covered disability.

Dorfman said he welcomed the challenge. By putting foundation leaders on the spot at conferences, Mizrahi is helping philanthropy see its shortcomings and grow.

“There’s a certain amount of discomfort when you get called out, even if you get called out rightfully,” he says. “This culture of politeness doesn’t serve marginalized communities well. It’s all right to make someone feel uncomfortable in pursuit of full inclusion.”

Diversity Includes Disabled People

Some foundations recognize they need help. A survey of 205 foundation chief executives conducted by the Center for Effective Philanthropy found that most leaders thought their organization was staffed by people with a diversity of backgrounds and served a diverse set of beneficiaries in terms of race, gender, and sexual orientation. But over half said they fell short when it came to people with a disability.

The reason, according to Judy Belk, president of the California Wellness Foundation, is many people think the Americans With Disabilities Act, passed in 1990, cured injustices faced by disabled people.

The existence of handicapped parking places and curb cuts on street corners, Belk says, doesn’t mean all of the challenges have been addressed. Similarly, just because philanthropies have crafted strategies designed to ameliorate inequities doesn’t mean they’ve faithfully put them into practice.

For Belk, concentrating on disabilities could be a good way to achieve progress in some of the foundation’s existing programs, including efforts to improve oral health for low-income adults, prevent HIV/AIDS among women of color, and help women of color adjust to society after being incarcerated. All of the groups that stand to benefit from that work, Belk says, include a large proportion of people with disabilities.

To start, the California Wellness Foundation had RespectAbility audit its website. Mizrahi’s staff found that the grant maker’s web presence wasn’t an inviting place for everyone. Belk ordered a redo to make sure the site complied with content-accessibility guidelines.

“Foundations have diversity, equity, and inclusion statements up the wazoo,” she says. “They can show you a statement and say they’re committed. I’d like to push ourselves and hold ourselves accountable.”

Easy Improvements

Foundations have largely failed to incorporate disability into the programs they run and the data they collect, Mizrahi says. And she thinks nonprofits in general have fallen behind businesses and government agencies in accommodating people with disabilities. Though many organizations would like to make progress, they often fear it will cost a lot.

Many fixes aren’t expensive but require presence of mind. For instance, Mizrahi says, it’s free and easy to make Twitter and Facebook feeds accessible and put captions on YouTube videos. And avoiding meetings in places like church basements that aren’t accessible for people in wheelchairs requires the presence of mind to schedule gatherings elsewhere.

Mizrahi says she’d rather educate than scold, and help people understand that people with disabilities are productive team members.

“I don’t view every organization equally,” she said. “The Americans With Disabilities Act treats organizations differently based on size and budget, and so do I. If it’s a small, fragile organization with nobody on staff, I have very few expectations they’ll all of a sudden have a personal-care assistant for someone who is a quadriplegic and on oxygen in order to participate in their program.”

Nonprofits lack clear guidelines on the steps they should take to make their organizations more accessible, according to Michael Thatcher, president of Charity Navigator. Over the past year, he has been in discussions with Mizrahi about how to encourage charities to get started.

Master Problem-Solvers

The first step, Mizrahi says, is to help organizations understand what kind of contributions people with disabilities can make.

At a Capitol Hill conference that RespectAbility held in July, Vincenzo Piscopo, the director of community and stakeholder relations for the Coca-Cola Company, told the 200 attendees that people with disabilities are often accustomed to overcoming obstacles and are master problem- solvers. It’s incumbent on people with disabilities in the work force to serve as ambassadors, to help employers understand what they bring to the table.

“When companies have people with disabilities, they’re providing value to their company,” he told the gathered crowd. “They’re not doing charity.”

Stephanie Farfan is one of those ambassadors. Farfan, a little person who calls herself a “master Googler,” was looking for internships specially geared toward disability issues and found RespectAbility online. There weren’t a lot of other opportunities like it.

RespectAbility’s fellows program, which is supported by the Stanford and Joan Alexander and Ford foundations, allows students and young professionals to work in public policy and communications roles and in the organization’s foundation practice.

Before she came to Washington to attend graduate school in international studies at American University, Farfan worked in Florida with Little People of America. A fluent Spanish speaker, her volunteer work with Little People of America often involved talking with Hispanic parents of children with dwarfism.

Coming to RespectAbility, Farfan, who wants to pursue a career at the State Department, has spent much of her time delving into state laws and regulations on disability issues.

“Coming over to the policy side has given me a new perspective,” she says. “It’s rounded out my skill set.”

‘One Toe in the Water’

Mizrahi’s behind-the-scenes work has resulted in changes in foundation practices. In addition to the National Committee on Responsive Philanthropy and the Belk Foundation, she shared — on the condition that they not be named — emails from several grant makers showing they had incorporated RespectAbility’s suggestions into their website design and broader communication strategy.

While she’d like to keep those successes private, she’s not afraid of publicly criticizing foundations she thinks are lagging behind.

She slammed the Lumina Foundation for not specifically incorporating people with disabilities in its work-force development grants. She said the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation provided little money to directly support disabilities and did not collect or disseminate data on the progress of students with disabilities in its domestic education work.

“I am deeply disturbed that Lumina and Gates aren’t doing dramatically more,” she says. “They are both sort of one toe in the water.”

In response, Lumina’s director of strategic communications, Kevin Corcoran, said that while there is “laudable” work being done to ensure people with disabilities succeed after high school, the foundation’s focus was on educational outcomes for students of color. The Gates Foundation said it has been making changes to address the issue, but it did not single out any one person who pushed for the revisions.

In October 2017, Gates “refreshed” its approach to education grant making. Since then, the foundation has said it has begun to disaggregate the data it collects so it can track students with disabilities, and it has begun to support programs to accommodate disabled charter-school students.

“We have already begun to fund research to help us understand how the foundation could best support success, engagement, and transitions for students with disabilities, and we plan to make the results of this research publicly available, via our grantees,” the foundation said in a statement.

An Advantage From Dyslexia

Activists have pushed foundations to recognize disabilities in the broader civil-rights context for decades. In the 1980s, Donors Forum, a collective of Illinois grant makers now known as Forefront, had a board meeting to discuss a survey on diversity it was going to send out to members.

Marca Bristo, who was a board member at the time, said there were no questions about disabilities. “They just plain forgot about it,” says Bristo, who is president of Access Living, a Chicago disability and housing advocate.

More recently, Bristo has noticed a desire among large foundations to learn more. Before the MacArthur Foundation awarded $100 million to Sesame Street Workshop and the International Rescue Committee last year as part of its 100&Change challenge, Bristo sat down with the foundation’s president Julia Stasch to figure out how to incorporate inclusion of people with disabilities into the award.

With Susan Sygall, a former MacArthur fellow and CEO of Mobility International, Bristo reviewed the contest’s eight semifinalists and developed a disability checklist that the applicants could use to assess their pitches.

“Leaders from the disability-rights movement have been working on these issues for years,” she wrote in an email to the Chronicle. “The work RespectAbility has focused on is critically important but not new. No one organization can do this transformational work alone. The intransigence of stigma, prejudice, and exclusion requires a sustained and collaborative effort by all of us.”

Before the winners were named, Mizrahi was instrumental in “amplifying” the work to include people with disabilities, according to Cecilia Conrad, who leads MacArthur’s 100&Change program. Mizrahi consulted with the foundation about what constitutes full inclusion and wrote opinion pieces that highlighted the role of inclusion in the award.

For Mizrahi, becoming an effective communicator didn’t come naturally. As someone with dyslexia, she didn’t begin reading until she was 12 and didn’t achieve functional literacy until two years later. After an early growth spurt, she reached her full, above average, adult height at a very early age. She seemed all grown up, but she was having a difficult time. Adults around her expressed their disappointment in her academic progress, calling her “lazy.”

Mizrahi responded to the challenge through intensive work on reading. She expertly honed her listening and speaking skills. Now, she says, when she enters any conversation or debate, her disability has given her a huge advantage.

“Having a disability means there’s something you can’t do in your everyday living. But there’s nothing in the world that says you can’t be the best in the world at something else.”

Donna Kalajian Lagani Joins Hearst Foundations

Hearst today announced that Donna Kalajian Lagani will join the Hearst Foundations after nearly 25 years at Hearst Magazines. Kalajian Lagani had been senior vice president and group publishing director of Hearst Magazines Young Women’s Group, encompassing CosmopolitanSeventeen and Women’s Health. The announcement was made by Hearst President and CEO Steven R. Swartz. Kalajian Lagani assumes her new role February 4. Her replacement at Hearst Magazines will be named shortly.

“Donna has done an outstanding job leading our flagship magazine brand for more than two decades, and I am thrilled that she has chosen to take the next step in her career journey at the Hearst Foundations,” Swartz said.

The Hearst Foundations are national philanthropic resources for organizations working in the fields of culture, education, health and social services. The Foundations identify and fund outstanding nonprofits to ensure that people of all backgrounds in the United States have the opportunity to build healthy, productive and inspiring lives. Created by William Randolph Hearst, the Foundations are independent, private philanthropies operating separately from Hearst. Since 1945, the Foundations have made over 20,000 grants totaling more than $1.1 billion. 

“Philanthropy is an important part of my life, and this is something I’ve always wanted to do,” Kalajian Lagani said. “I’ve had the absolute best job on the planet for more than two decades, overseeing Cosmopolitan, the most powerful young women’s media brand in the world, and more recently, adding SeventeenWomen’s Health and brand licensing to my purview. Now, after a ‘fun and fearless’ career generating revenue and profits, I feel truly blessed to work with the Foundations and its directors, Paul ‘Dino’ Dinovitz and George Irish. The Foundations’ grants profoundly change people’s lives, and I’m honored to join them to uphold the legacy of William Randolph Hearst and his philanthropic efforts.”   

In a joint statement, Dinovitz and Irish said, “We have known for some time of Donna’s interest in philanthropy and impacting lives for the better, and we’re pleased that she will be joining us, bringing her philanthropic interest and executive talent to the Foundations.”

Kalajian Lagani joined Hearst Magazines in 1995 as publisher of Cosmopolitan and was named publishing director in 1999. She added oversight of Seventeen in 2014 and of Women’s Health in 2018, following Hearst’s acquisition of Rodale. During her career at Cosmopolitan, Kalajian Lagani introduced groundbreaking initiatives, most recently through mobile and artificial intelligence technology. She developed and immortalized the “fun fearless female” mantra used by Cosmopolitan editions worldwide. During her tenure, she helped launch CosmoGIRL! and Cosmo for Latinas, and was a strong force in bringing Cosmopolitan to new platforms, including Snapchat and Sirius XM Radio. 

Kalajian Lagani conceived and produced a Cosmopolitan “takeover” of Times Square on New Year’s Eve in 2015 to celebrate the brand’s 50 birthday and developed the “Fun Fearless Life” conference in New York City to empower young women. She initiated a multi-year brand partnership with the USO and received the organization’s Distinguished Service Award in 2010. Kalajian Lagani also launched the $100,000 Cosmopolitan “Practice Safe Sun” research grant and was honored as a cosmetic industry leader at the prestigious DreamBall in 2005 for her support of the “Look Good Feel Better” program and the American Cancer Society.

Kalajian Lagani sits on the Board of Directors of Circle of Generosity and the Fragrance Foundation. 

Eric Garcetti, 360 MAGAZINE, dtla, flexla

FlexLA  

Mayor Eric Garcetti rides FlexLA w/ US Navy Veteran Andrew Gallo!

“We seize every opportunity to give Angelenos faster, more convenient, connections to their jobs, the people they love and everything our City has to offer,” said Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti. “FlexLA will give people another affordable, sustainable, and efficient way to get where they are going – while providing our veterans with good paying jobs.”

Stay tuned for a video of the Mayor’s FlexLA ride to be posted on social media!

Travel around Downtown LA driven by a salaried driver – many of whom are U.S. military veterans – for an affordable, flat rate fare – on-demand. And this week, it’s FREE!

During the day, use the app to access LADOT transit info, and from 7pm to 2am, FlexLA vans are ready to take you anywhere you want to go within DTLA.

HOW THEY ARE DIFFERENT

First, FASTLinkDTLA is a non-profit partnership of businesses, employers, developers, business improvement districts, organizations, and nonprofits focused on improving mobility, transportation and infrastructure in Downtown Los Angeles. One part of our mission is to promote and re-brand DTLA as a new mobility innovation center by creating a network of early adopters and travel adventurers. Thus, the creation of FlexLA!

With FlexLA, you can:

Search, book and pay for on-demand ridesharing service

Have peace of mind with our predictable, flat rate fare guarantee

Count on safe, accessible, well-lit stops and screened drivers

Ride easy with an experienced, salaried driver, many of whom are U.S. military veterans

Request a wheelchair-accessible vehicle via our partner ButterFli

View the app in English or Spanish

OTR II

By Vaughn Lowery

Last night concluded the Los Angeles leg of OTRII tour, featuring Beyoncé and Jay-Z.

DJ Khaled opened up for the Carters alongside of special guests – Tyga, Tank, YG and Ella Mai. With thousands of screaming fans, Bey and her husband transformed the Rose Bowl into an iconic night to commemorate. Massive LED screens, scores of dancers coupled with pyrotechnics and a state-of-the-art sound system commanded one of the most powerful performances of our lifetime. No wonder the show (earlier this year) has been decorated by both Michelle and Barack Obama’s presence as well as the Kardashians and Oprah. ‘Apeshit‘ off of their latest collaboration Everything is Love was a crowd favorite as Bey spits some serious bars with her epic flow which rivals some of today’s top lyricists.

With less than 8 shows left, you may want to consider making arrangements to see this landmark presentation at on of its last stops.

If anything to witness the bright smiles of 11 high school students who will receive one $100,000 scholarships (per city) from both the BeyGOOD and Shawn Carter foundations.

Remaining OTR II tour dates.

Beyoncé, Jay-Z, 360 magazine

Beyoncé, 360 magazine

Beyoncé, 360 magazine

*Photos courtesy of Frank Micellotta

Dairy Queen

The Dairy Queen® System Expects a Blizzard of Miracles on August 2

DQ® hosts 13th annual Miracle Treat Day to benefit Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals®

WHO: Participating Dairy Queen®and DQ Grill & Chill® locations throughout the United States

WHAT: Will help make miracles for hospitalized children during DQ®’s 13th annual Miracle Treat Day, when $1 or more from every Blizzard® Treat sold at participating locations will be donated to local Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals® (CMN Hospitals). CMN Hospitals raise funds to help save and improve the lives of kids treated at 170 children’s hospitals across the U.S. and Canada.

All donations collected on Miracle Treat Day stay in the communities in which they are raised to support pediatric patients and their families in local CMN Hospitals.

WHEN: All day Thursday, August 2, 2018

WHERE: Visit MiracleTreatDay.com for the nearest participating Dairy Queen or DQ Grill & Chill locations.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
The featured Miracle Treat Day “Blizzard of the Day” will be Oreo®, which is still the most popular Blizzard Treat to date. The Blizzard Treat of the Month for August in the U.S. is the new TWIX® Blizzard Treat. All other Blizzard Treat flavors are also available that day.

During a 34-year partnership with CMN Hospitals, the Dairy Queen system has raised more than $135 million for local hospitals.

For more information about Miracle Treat Day, visit MiracleTreatDay.com and connect on social media at #MiracleTreatDay.

About Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals:
Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals® raises funds and awareness for 170 member hospitals that provide 32 million treatments each year to kids across the U.S. and Canada. Donations stay local to fund critical treatments and healthcare services, pediatric medical equipment and charitable care. Since 1983, Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals has raised more than $5 billion, most of it $1 at a time through the charity’s Miracle Balloon icon. Its various fundraising partners and programs support the nonprofit’s mission to save and improve the lives of as many children as possible. Find out why children’s hospitals need community support, identify your member hospital and learn how you can Put Your Money Where the Miracles Are, at CMNHospitals.org and facebook.com/CMNHospitals.

About IDQ:
International Dairy Queen Inc., (IDQ), based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, is the parent company of American Dairy Queen Corporation. Through its subsidiaries, IDQ develops, licenses and services a system of more than 6,700 locations in the United States, Canada and more than 25 other countries. IDQ is a subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. (Berkshire) which is led by Warren Buffett, the legendary investor and CEO of Berkshire. For more information visit DairyQueen.com

Dress for Success x New Leaders

Dress for Success Worldwide announces the addition of two talented leaders to the Dress for Success Board of Directors- Chief Executive Officer of M Booth, Dale Bornstein, and Chief Operating Officer at Etsy, Linda Findley Kozlowski. These powerful women join an already impressive roster of board members, offering new perspectives and an array of skill sets derived from more than 25 years of experience in public relations and international marketing industries.

 

Dale Bornstein

In 2013, after a 25-year career at Ketchum, Dale Bornstein took the reins of M Booth and led the firm’s drive towards integration and expansion, deepening and building new capabilities and recruiting best-in-class talent, resulting in the agency’s most successful period of client acquisition and revenue growth. Dale believes that people who live inspiring lives do inspiring work. This philosophy is at the core of M Booth’s employee-centric culture, where staff are encouraged to pursue their passions and apply that inspiration to driving client success. The firm has doubled in size under her leadership, attracted diverse talent and won every major industry award for both the agency and its clients. Dale has been named to PRWeek’s “Power List” twice over the last two years and the agency has won over 40 industry awards since 2015. She is currently serving a three year term for the Public Relations Council (PRC) where she helps champion the SHEQUALITY

 

Linda Findley Kozlowski

Linda Findley Kozlowski, COO of Etsy, the global marketplace for unique and creative goods, also brings 25 years of experience in operations, strategy, marketing, business development, public relations and customer service. During her time at both public and private companies, she has proven her ability to scale organizations, expand into new markets, introduce products, manage change, improve processes, increase efficiency, and adapt within complex and rapidly changing environments. An accomplished technology, small business and consumer product executive, she has overseen growth initiatives in almost every region of the world including Europe, Asia, Latin America, Russia and India.

 

About Dress for Success:

Dress for Success is an international not-for-profit organization that empowers women to achieve economic independence by providing a network of support, professional attire and the development tools to help women thrive in work and in life. Since starting operations in 1997, Dress for Success has expanded to 160 cities in 30 countries. To date, Dress for Success has helped over 1,000,000 women work towards self-sufficiency. Visit www.dressforsuccess.org to learn more.

WOODBURY COMMON AGAINST BREAST CANCER

Woodbury Common Premium Outlets announced its Spring 2018 More Than Pink movement in support of Susan G. Komen and the fight against breast cancer. As part of its pledge to donate at least $1 million each year in 2017 and 2018, more than 170 participating Simon Malls®, The Mills® and Premium Outlets® nationwide will once again be participating in a range of fundraising activities during the months of April and May.

 

“We are thrilled to launch our Spring 2018 More Than Pink initiatives and have been overwhelmed by the ongoing positive support this movement has garnered with our shoppers, retailers and employees to support Susan G. Komen in its tireless efforts to reduce breast cancer deaths,” said Enna Allen, Simon’s Vice President of Brand Management.

 

From April 14 to May 20, visitors to Woodbury Common Premium Outlets will be able to participate in several programs to help support Susan G. Komen.

 

Discount Card Program: In exchange for a $10 donation to Susan G. Komen, shoppers will receive a Discount Pass, available at Guest Services, providing 25 percent off one item at participating retailers. More than 100 retailers are taking part in the program, including Diane Von Furstenberg, Adidas, Furla, Dooney & Bourke, Kate Spade, La Perla, Lladro, Maje Paris, Pinko, Theory and Vineyard Vines.

 

All Discount Pass donations go to Susan G. Komen.

 

Race for the Cure®: Race for The Cure® events will take place across the U.S. with local Simon teams participating to support the local Susan G. Komen Affiliates. Simon encourages shoppers to join in by locating and registering for an event near them. Woodbury Common Premium Outlets shoppers can join the Komen North Jersey Race For The Cure to be held on Sunday, May 6, in Jersey City, New Jersey. To register go to https://ww5.komen.org/raceforthecure/

 

About Woodbury Common Premium Outlets

Conveniently accessed from New York City via the New York State Thruway at Exit 16, Woodbury Common Premium Outlets features 240 stores including Tory Burch, Celine, Nike, Bottega Veneta, Polo Ralph Lauren, Michael Kors, Burberry, Coach, The North Face, and more, all at a savings of 25 percent to 65 percent every day. Market Hall offers a variety of dining opportunities including Chipotle, Pret A Manger, Pinkberry and more.  To learn more, visit http://www.premiumoutlets.com/outlet/woodbury-common.

About Simon

Simon is a global leader in the ownership of premier shopping, dining, entertainment and mixed-use destinations and an S&P 100 company (Simon Property Group, NYSE:SPG). Our properties across North America, Europe and Asia provide community gathering places for millions of people every day and generate billions in annual sales. For more information, visit simon.com.

 

About Susan G. Komen®

Susan G. Komen is the world’s largest breast cancer organization, funding more breast cancer research than any other nonprofit outside of the federal government while providing real-time help to those facing the disease. Komen has set a Bold Goal to reduce the current number of breast cancer deaths by 50 percent in the U.S. by 2026. Since its founding in 1982, Komen has funded more than $956 million in research and provided more than $2.1 billion in funding to screening, education, treatment and psychosocial support programs, serving millions of people in 60 countries worldwide. Komen was founded by Nancy G. Brinker, who promised her sister, Susan G. Komen, that she would end the disease that claimed Suzy’s life. That promise has become Komen’s promise to all people facing breast cancer. Visit komen.org or call 1-877 GO KOMEN. Connect with us on social at ww5.komen.org/social.

PEDAL ON THE PIER

HAROLD ROBINSON FOUNDATION HOSTS 8TH ANNUAL “PEDAL ON THE PIER” FUNDRAISER IN SANTA MONICA SUNDAY, JUNE 3

 

High Energy 100-Mile Outdoor Ride, Red Carpet, Food, Music and Fun Festivities on the Iconic Santa Monica Pier Benefiting LA’s Underserved Youth

 

WHO:  Harold Robinson Foundation 501(c)3

 

WHAT: The Pedal on the Pier fundraiser transforms Santa Monica Pier into a high energy outdoor cycling studio to raise money for the foundation’s Camp Ubuntu, which provides LA’s underprivileged children with a unique camp experience. The lessons and experiences these children learn at Camp Ubuntu enrich their lives and empower them with necessary skills needed to better themselves at home, across their communities and throughout life. Pedal on the Pier has raised over a million dollars last year, totaling over five million dollars, and hopes to far surpass those numbers this year.

 

With the Pacific Ocean as the backdrop, Pedal on the Pier’s 5-hour spin-a-thon features teams riding on indoor cycling bikes provided by Stages Cycling, live musical performances, DJs, spin instructors from Revolution Fitness Santa Monica, celebrities, athletes, food and drinks from local restaurants, influential brands and fun festivities in the sun.

 

In order to participate, riders can register as an individual and join a team or start a team. Each team must raise a minimum of $2,500 for the Harold Robinson Foundation to have a bike reserved. Registered riders will receive a free T-shirt, swag bag and a meal ticket and access to the 21 and over lounge with hosted alcoholic beverages from sponsors. There will also be a cash bar with beer and wine. There will also be a limited number of $100 spectator tickets which includes access to the festivities and hosted food and beverages from local vendors.

 

WHEN:

June 3, 2018

11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Red carpet begins at 9:30 a.m.

 

WHERE:

Santa Monica Pier

200 Santa Monica Pier

Santa Monica, CA 90401

 

TICKETS: Participants can register as a “Team” (1-5 riders) with a minimum fundraising commitment of $2,500 per bike or purchase a spectator tickets for $100. Tickets and registration are available at www.pedalonthepier.com and click on REGISTER.

###

 

About The Harold Robinson Foundation: 

 

The Harold Robinson Foundation is a 501(c)2 founded in 2009 by Jeff Robinson, Joyce Hyser Robinson and David Moss. It began with an idea from Jeff Robinson, almost 20 years ago; that every child should have the same opportunities he had as a kid, no matter where they stand on the socioeconomic ladder. The foundation is named for Jeff’s late father. The Harold Robinson Foundation provides the funding and resources to send Los Angeles’s less fortunate children to camp, in a safe and nurturing environment, far away from the stress that most of them face on a daily basis. The foundation also runs a summer day at the Markham Middle School in Watts, CA. For more information, visit www.haroldrobinsonfoundation.org/.

Pilgrimage Festival x Buy Passes NOW

“Pilgrimage Music Festival, held just south of Nashville in Franklin, Tennessee, established itself as a festival to watch.” – Rolling Stone

 

“The festival favors rock, country, gospel, pop, Americana and the intersection of all of the above, and the rest of the roster reflects this.” – Billboard

 

“While the growing number of music festivals across the country continue to pump out similar-looking lineup posters, genre-focused events like Pilgrimage will most likely see plenty of both pop and country music-loving attendees walk through its gates come September.” – AXS

 

Passes for the fourth annual Pilgrimage Music & Cultural Festival in Franklin, TN September 22 and 23, 2018 are now on sale. Pilgrimage announced their lineup earlier this week that will entice music lovers to #MakeThePilgrimage to The Park at Harlinsdale for two unforgettable days of music, art and culture set against the natural amphitheaters with memorable performances by Jack White, Chris Stapleton, Lionel Richie, Hozier, Brandi Carlile and more in an intimate setting. The full 2018 lineup includes:

Jack White * Chris Stapleton * Lionel Richie

Hozier * Brandi Carlile * Counting Crows

Amos Lee * Bleachers * Lord Huron * Dawes

Maggie Rogers * Elle King * Mat Kearney

Valerie June * The Struts * Jade Bird * Kevin Griffin * Keb’ Mo’

The White Buffalo * Pete Yorn * The Record Company

Caitlyn Smith * John Moreland * The Infamous Stringdusters

Tall Heights * Tyminski * Aaron Lee Tasjan * Jillian Jacqueline

Low Cut Connie * Donovan Woods * Courtney Marie Andrews

Rebirth Brass Band * Wild Rivers * Joshua Hedley * Caroline Rose

Robert Finley * Devon Gilfillian *Whitney Rose * Lilly Hiatt

Sarah Shook & The Disarmers * AHI * Liz Longley * Hannah Dasher

Josh Martin * Bishop Gunn * Ralph’s World + Friends * Siama’s Congo Roots * 123 Andrés

Mister G * Cajun Mike * Tom Mason and the Blue Buccaneers + more

 

PRESS HERE to watch Artist Announce Video

 

Experience why Rolling Stone called Pilgrimage “a festival to watch” and “one of the South’s premier festivals” by The Tennessean with a 2-Day Pilgrimage pass ($185) OR 2-Day VIP Village pass ($975) as well as on-site parking passes for $60 while limited supplies last. The VIP Village is presented in partnership with Strategic Hospitality of Nashville. Want to bring the kids? No problem! Pilgrimage has something for everyone and children 10 and under get in FREE when accompanied by an adult Pilgrimage Pass. To purchase your passes, please visit www.pilgrimagefestival.com/tickets.

 

This year the festival unveiled an exclusive new experience called The Grand Champion Experience with Blackberry Farm– a heralded culinary, event and hotel venue in the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee. The Grand Champion pass includes all the amenities provided in the VIP Village Experience, plus even more exclusive access to live performances, with Blackberry Farm culinary & beverage delights at the Festival, and a private Friday night banquet.

 

This year Pilgrimage will also feature a Made South Maker Village with over 60 local and regional craft vendors and Bell’s Brewery Craft Beer Hall with televised SEC and NFL football games. You can also experience the Millville, TN Market as well as the Farm to Turntable food truck park featuring 18 local food trucks including bars and shaded center court. Between sets, celebrate the musical heritage of the Deep South with the Americana Music Triangle Experience.  And everything is conveniently located to historic downtown Franklin, TN at The Park at Harlinsdale! Festival-goers can plan their trip to Franklin as well as get more information and lodging suggestions at visitfranklin.com.

 

Pilgrimage would also like to welcome the following brand partners to the Pilgrimage family this year which include Bell’s Brewery, ASCAP, Citibank, Deep South Studios, The Frye Company, George Dickel, Kirkland’s, Maui Jim, Tito’s Handmade Vodka and Visit Franklin as well as the Americana Music Triangle Experience partners (Visit Franklin, Tupelo Convention & Visitors Bureau, State of Tennessee Tourism Development, Alabama Tourism Department, Florence Lauderdale Tourism, Ryman Auditorium, Tunica Convention & Visitors Bureau, State of Arkansas, New Orleans Jazz Museum, and the Country Music Hall of Fame).

 

A very special thanks to the community partners including Americana Music Triangle, Heritage Foundation, Friends of Franklin Parks, MusiCares®, City of Franklin, Visit Franklin and Williamson Chamber of Commerce.

 

The festival continues to drive tourism dollars to Williamson County and the Pilgrimage Foundation, the festival’s non-profit arm, will donate a portion of each ticket sale to benefit the City of Franklin and Friends of Franklin Parks. In addition, a portion of ticket sales will also benefit MusiCares, a nonprofit organization that was established by the Recording Academy™ to provide a wide range of emergency financial assistance and addiction recovery resources to members of the music community.

 

 
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Seth Rogen’s Hilarity for Charity

It was a night to remember in Los Angeles as Seth Rogen, along with a star-studded cast, came together to raise funds for Alzheimer’s Disease at his 6th annual Hilarity for Charity variety show (On Mar 24). Thought you could use in any weekend celebrity round-ups you may be working on.

As the premier spirit of the event, comedians and guests alike were able to sip and savor a variety of Crown Royal cocktails while kicking back and enjoying a few laughs – all while doing some good. Crown Royal also gifted their generous host, Seth Rogen with a custom embroidered bag and bottle of Crown Royal XR.

 

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