Posts tagged with "new art"

The Inaugural Faena Festival

Faena Art presents Faena Festival: This Is Not America.

A New Annual Multidisciplinary Festival during Miami Art Week, from December 3-9, 2018.

The First Faena Festival explores the mythologies and narratives of ‘America’ and commissions new installations and performances that reflect the multiplicity of cultures, voices, and people across its physical, conceptual, and political borders.

Faena Festival: This Is Not America features commissions, installations, and performances by Derrick Adams, Cecilia Bengolea, Alfredo Jaar, Isabel Lewis, Luna Paiva, Tavares Strachan, and Wu Tsang and boychild, among others.

Faena Festival, This Is Not America, is keyed to Miami’s enduring role as a port that welcomes migrants, refugees, and tourists from across the US and the Americas, and from countries throughout the world. The festival engages with the multiplicity of communities and cultures and the palimpsest of histories that have created the Americas while responding specifically to Miami as its hemispheric hub. All programming is free and open to the public.

This Is Not America is anchored by Alfredor Jaar’s groundbreaking work, A Logo for America, and proposes a new curatorial format for presentation that occupies and engages the entire Faena District and extends beyond into public spaces of the city of Miami Beach as an experiential platform. The diverse venues of the Faena District Miami Beach will be activated, including the public areas of the street, sidewalk, and beach; the Faena Hotel, including its theater and screening room; and Faena Forum – the OMA-designed cultural centerpiece of Faena District Miami Beach.

“From the beginning my vision for Faena has been to create a cultural epicenter that draws artists and audiences from throughout the Americas and around the world,” stated Alan Faena, Founder and President of the Faena Group. “The annual Faena Festival will provide a new platform to explore ideas in contemporary culture that fosters engagement with the issues that define us individually and collectively. We are interested in site-specificity and universal impact – in creating a cultural movement without borders, we want to speak to the world. Artists are not limited by geopolitical divides, and ultimately, by celebrating these diverse artists and visions we find ways in which we are all connected.”

“This Is Not America addresses America as concept more than a piece, a contested and powerful idea that is greater than the waters and borders that frame it,” noted Zoe Lukov, curator of Faena Art. “Artists in the Festival have been invited to explore the concept of America as a myth and a narrative that has at times bound and divided us but ultimately has the power to unify. By occupying the interstitial zone between land and sea many of these site-specific installations seek to reimagine porous and transitional spaces as places of refuge and safe harbor that are representative of what our ‘America’ is and can become.”

KELSEY NAPIER

MAKAPUU

oil on canvas

36″ x 60″

Kelsey NaPier

I spent the first eighteen years of my life growing up on the south shore of Oahu. I learned how to surf at age three, feeling grounded by the constant blue horizon and the majestic Hawaiian mountains. Growing up on the most isolated land mass in the world I paid attention to every brilliant piece of nature unfolding before me with the changing tradewinds. I often use the colors of my childhood, lush green, cobalt blue, tangerine, and magenta as building blocks for my paintings. In Hawaii, the people, language, food, and customs are a mixture of the many cultures of people who came to the islands – Samoan, Native Hawaiian, Japanese, Chinese, English, Korean, and Filipino. Beauty comes in unexpected forms and from many points of view.

When I see something beautiful that I do not fully understand, I have an impulse to paint it. What I’m physically attracted to may be the sherbert clouds resting on steep Hawaiian mountains in Paka Nahele , the porcelain skin of a friend in Amber , or the ephemeral floating tentacles of a jellyfish in Float . I find something physically stunning because there is a certain spiritual element beckoning me to search for the sublime.

Heaven is that feeling when just for a second you have a glimpse past our physical world and into something else. Just after the sun has gone down in Makapu’u , the ocean becomes mercurial. In Erin Surfs , my sister effortlessly dances upon the waves and becomes one with the ocean.

In Float I explored a recurring dream of floating through nebulas in space with no gravity. Weightlessness, a feeling similar to the buoyancy when swimming in the ocean, flooded my heart with a sense of peace. I sought to capture that by making a photo collage of nebulas, jellyfish, and synapse firing. I painted loosely from the collage, pouring paint from one canvas onto another. Every time I liked an effect, I replicated it and enhanced it by adding drop shadows and pops of color. I painted over the parts that felt unnecessary and moved forward adding, subtracting, and refining my vision.

I enjoy painting large pieces because they are challenging and take the movement of the entire body- the feet, the arms, and the core. Painting large makes me feel like I’m dancing with a partner.

My purpose is to seek these beautiful moments and to relay them to other people. I believe that we are connected in ways that we cannot always immediately see. My time on earth will have been meaningful if I have felt gratitude for the beauty around me, engaged with the sublime, and allowed other people to feel that same joy. This world is inherently meaningful. Art is the seeking of this meaning.

PELE RISES

32″ x 72″

oil on canvas

MIXED

72″ x 96″

oil on wood

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For more artwork: http://www.kelseynapier.com