Posts tagged with "muslim"

SARAH MAPLE × “THOUGHTS AND PRAYERS”

SARAH MAPLE, “THOUGHTS AND PRAYERS” 

A Solo Exhibition Curated by Indira Cesarine

OPENING RECEPTION January 22 // 6pm-9pm 

EXHIBITION ON VIEW January 22 – February 3, 2019

THE UNTITLED SPACE 

45 Lispenard Street Unit 1W 

NYC 10013 

The Untitled Space gallery is pleased to present “Thoughts and Prayers” a solo exhibition of works by artist Sarah Maple, curated by gallery director Indira Cesarine, opening January 22, 2019, and on view through February 3, 2019. Sarah Maple is an award-winning visual artist known for her bold, brave, mischievous and occasionally controversial artworks that challenge notions of identity, religion and the status quo. Hailing from Britain, this will be the first solo exhibition of the artist in the United States. Much of Maple’s inspiration originates from being raised Muslim, with parents of mixed religious and cultural backgrounds. “Thoughts and Prayers” will feature many new works, as well as a selection of some of her most notable past works, exploring a wide variety of media including performance, painting, photography, sculpture, collage, installation, and video. Maple’s pro-feminist artwork provokes a dialogue with her sharp humor and satirical eye. She fearlessly addresses what it means to be a Muslim in the Western world. Her taboo-breaking artwork fights against censorship as she investigates themes of politics, violence, freedom, feminism, and the ironies of pop culture. She often employs self-portraiture as a vehicle for her narrative, or engages guerrilla-style performance as a means to convey her message. 

“Using her own image, and drawing on her experience as a Muslim woman, Sarah tackles society’s many taboos, elevating those previously oppressed, and giving voice to those long since silenced.”   i-D Vice 

“Maple has made a name for herself over the years for pushing the boundaries of femininity, and for publicly discussing the convergence of her dual-Muslim heritage with feminism. Rather than crumble, Maple has an impressive resolve in the face of cyber adversity: she tries to laugh instead of cry… Maple hopes to examine where freedom of speech ends and abuse begins.” – Dazed Digital

“Maple could well be the only artist to take on the Kardashians (with her ‘Keeping Up With The Kapulets’ show), stereotypes around Islam (with her ‘I Love Orgasms’ acrylic), and the taboos around menstruation (with her ‘Menstruate With Pride’ triptych). She has received a flurry of glowing reviews – and even more death threats.” – Good Trouble 

“I think we need to be challenged, we need to hear challenging, radical, provocative things, even if we don’t agree with them, as it’s those things that make us react and make us want to bring about change…” Sarah Maple for TEDx

Sarah Maple graduated with BA in Fine Art from Kingston University London in 2007 and in the same year won The Saatchi Gallery’s “4 New Sensations” award for emerging artists. Maple’s artwork, film, and performances have been exhibited internationally at galleries and institutions including Tate Britain, The Barbican, AIR Gallery, and The New Art Exchange, among many others. Maple’s work has been the subject of documentaries including for ARTE and VPRO. In 2015 she released her first book “You Could Have Done This,” a hardback of selected works. The same year she was awarded a Sky Academy Arts scholarship from Sky Arts, which included funding, mentoring and a Sky Arts documentary. In 2017 she gave a TEDx talk in Birmingham, UK on the importance of free speech, titled “The Freedom To Be Challenged.” 

Her work has been featured in numerous international publications, including Vogue, The Guardian, i-D Magazine, The Sunday Times UK, The Independent, People Magazine, Dazed, and the Huffington Post among many others. In 2018 she was invited to make a limited edition cover for Harper’s Bazaar’s art issue alongside artists including Yayoi Kusama, Barbara Kruger, and Linder Sterling. Her artwork is in collections including Soho House, The Hyman Collection and the Ned. Sarah lives and works in Sussex, England. 

ARTIST STATEMENT

“My work is largely motivated by my upbringing as well as my interest in activism and gender politics. Citing current affairs I create works that provoke the viewer through satirical, tongue-in-cheek commentary. My mother is a Muslim from Kenya, who married my British father in the 1970s. She raised me as a Muslim in the UK and sent my siblings and I to a Catholic school. Much of my work examines the duality of my multicultural upbringing and the conflict of identity among young Muslims living in the western world. I began to explore these themes after reflecting on Muslim identity in Britain post 9/11and7/7 and the impact of the Iraq war. Motivated by the current political climate and being from an immigrant background, these subjects are close to my heart as I question notions of identity, belonging, and “otherness” in my works.  

I see many parallels between the UK and the US, especially with Brexit and the Trump election. The gun debate is something especially intriguing to the British. The threat of terror is continually focused on and yet nothing is done about gun laws. When officials offer up “Thoughts And Prayers,” it appears hollow and insincere. I am interested in how a lack of action directly and/or indirectly inflicts suffering and potential violence on its citizens. 

Also inspired by feminism and gender politics, my work aims to challenge deep-seated ideas about what it means to be a woman. I am interested in the role shame plays in women’s lives – how we take up space in the world, our physical appearance, bodily functions and “blame culture.” I explore the ways we can change the visual narrative for women as a form of empowerment. The medium I choose is determined by the strongest way to deliver my message; hence it is constantly evolving across a wide variety of media. Self-portraiture, for example, offers the possibility of taking ownership of our image. When we photograph ourselves, we have complete control over how we want our selves, our gender, our femininity, and our sexuality to be perceived by others. Humor is also an important element in my work. I often use a “Trojan horse” to get my message across and sometimes I just like to point out the obvious as this can be the most direct way to highlight how ridiculous something is. I used to accept a lot at face value but when I discovered feminism it motivated me not only to question the role of women, but also the preconceived ideas relating to all things in society.” – Artist Sarah Maple 

ABOUT THE UNTITLED SPACE:

The Untitled Space is an art gallery located in Tribeca, New York in a landmark building on Lispenard Street. Founded in 2014 by Indira Cesarine, the gallery features an ongoing curation of exhibits of emerging and established contemporary artists exploring conceptual framework and boundary pushing ideology through mediums of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video and performance art. The gallery is committing to exploring new ideas vis-à-vis traditional and new mediums and highlights a program of “Women in Art” as well as special events aligned with our creative vision. 

Exhibition Contacts:

The Untitled Space info@untitled-space.com 

Website link: http://untitled-space.com/sarah-maple-thoughts-and-prayers/

The Untitled Space

Muslim Advocates Responds to Facebook’s Latest Effort to Cover Up its Campaign to Discredit Civil Rights Groups

The following is a statement from Farhana Khera, executive director of Muslim Advocates, in response to the release of a 3-page document from Facebook that provides a peak into its campaign to tie valid concerns about the bigotry on Facebook’s platforms to an anti-Semitic effort to vilify Jewish philanthropist George Soros. Muslim Advocates has long been engaged in coalition efforts to root out bigotry on Facebook:

Since Facebook’s smear campaign against civil society groups was unearthed two weeks ago, Muslim Advocates has requested that Facebook disclose all of the research done in the name of discrediting Soros and other organizations seeking to hold Facebook accountable for the bigotry that has flourished on its platforms.

But the company has only responded with silence, and we haven’t seen any documents – until today and only because a media outlet received a leaked document. In anticipation of Buzzfeed publishing an excerpt of the memo that provides a peak into Facebook’s efforts to tie valid criticism into a long-running anti-Semitic campaign, Facebook released that one 3-page document.

Facebook has fallen woefully short of the bare minimum expectations of a company that claims to create welcoming and safe communities online. Facebook still hasn’t  come clean with all of its opposition research, which is what a company that’s seeking to build trust with its users and the public would do, and its top executives mislead and obfuscate, at best.

Facebook continues to change its story regarding the fact that its top executives directed and were clearly aware of what was happening. Instead, they hid more, and they proved to us that they are simply incapable of being responsible stewards of the company and the community of users that they’ve built.

Facebook has sowed division and profited from stoking rage, divisiveness, and bigotry. This is the mess they have created, and they have proven to be entirely incapable of taking responsibility for their actions  and cleaning it up. We stand with MoveOn, Color of Change, and our allies demanding that Facebook do more.

Significant changes need to be made in order to fix Facebook.  Releasing all the opposition research developed to target civil society groups and leaders is just the start. It has now become even more clear that fundamental leadership change to allow for accountability in the operations of the company is absolutely necessary: Mark Zuckerberg should step down as Chairman, Sheryl Sandberg should be removed from the Board of Directors, and three independent members should be added to the Board, including at least one individual who is a privacy and civil liberties expert. Facebook: change your ways, change your leadership, and let the country heal.

Muslim Advocates is a national legal advocacy and educational organization that works on the frontlines of civil rights to guarantee freedom and justice for Americans of all faiths.

ART BASEL × JEWISH MUSEUM

A WINNING TRIFECTA

FOR ART BASEL SEASON AT

THE JEWISH MUSEUM OF FLORIDA-FIU

Alexander Calder, Environment and Evolution, 1973

The Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU delivers a winning trifecta with three original exhibitions for Art Basel season: a show especially curated for art lovers who are yearning to see works by some of the world’s most acclaimed modern masters, the fashion world’s electrifying new star, and a heartwarming remembrance of a beloved painter that brings to life South Florida’s artistic history.

Marc Chagall … Lee Krasner … Roy Lichtenstein … Alexander Calder … and Peter Max! The Art of the Lithograph (on view through March 3), features world- renowned modern masters. Daniel Chimowitz: Walking Canvases (through February 3), is the first- ever museum show by the fashion designer/graffiti artist. Edna Glaubman: Retrospective (through December), is a tribute to the late artist, one of Florida’s most revered painters.

The works in The Art of the Lithograph are on loan from some of America’s leading private and public collections, including: The Metropolitan Art Museum and The New York Historical Society, the Collection of Lori Gold and Alan Hall of Miami Beach, and Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion.

Marc Chagall, The Promenade, 1918, Loan of Lori Gold and Allan Hall of Miami Beach

Thirty gorgeous prints explore the history of the lithography process, taking the visitor from lithography stones to off-set and computer-to-plate printing. The Art of the Lithograph features printmaking works by Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Jim Dine, Don Eddy, R.B. Kitaj, Lee Krasner, Roy Lichtenstein, Peter Max and Camille Pissarro, among others.

These striking works will be exhibited alongside actual litho stones, and materials that showcase the step-by-step process of lithography making.

Roy Lichtenstein, Mermaid, 1978

Daniel Chimowitz Headlines This Triple-Threat

Headlining Art Basel Season at the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU is Daniel Chimowitz: Walking Canvases (through February 3). This world premiere marks the first-ever museum show by the celebrated fashion designer and international graffiti artist. Known for creating walking canvases of painted images on hand-sewn and upcycled clothing, Chimowitz combines art with the energy of street art and fashion.

For this new exhibition, Chimowitz has created all new works, never before seen, along with site-specific murals and installations. The artist will make a special appearance to greet the public at the museum on December 9 at 10:00 a.m. for the museum’s annual Sunday brunch during the week of Art Basel Miami Beach. “I design to empower men and women to be warriors in their own right,” said Daniel Chimowitz. “All fashion is about confidence. The more confident you are, the more willing you are to stand out and be original,” adds Chimowitz.

Daniel Chimowitz

Daniel Chimowitz, Installation at Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU

Walking Canvases features seven murals by Chimowitz, 32 new fashion ensembles, two paintings by Chimowitz, two murals by Miami graffiti artist Freddy Aquino, and a selfie-booth by Miami artist Evo Love.

In Chimowitz’s textiles, colors are combined with the punk DIY fashion of London, studs from Spain, and the influences of his two mothers: one mother had Polish/Jewish heritage, and his other mom was Tlinglit (indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest).

There are even outfits that look different in photos when photographed using a flash: made from reflective material inspired by emergency first-responders. His fashions have been shown on the runways in Paris, London, Beijing, New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Miami, and he has worked with designer Patricia Field.

Installation image, fashion creations by Daniel Chimowitz at the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU

Installation image, fashion creations by Daniel Chimowitz at the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU

As a graffiti artist since he was a teenager, the “street style” is clearly evident in his work. Chimowitz was born in London in 1976 and raised in San Francisco by his two mothers, Sylvia and Rachel.

He grew up among the LGBT community, a child of San Francisco’s Castro District where he learned to be who you truly are, and not to be afraid to express oneself. Chimowitz recently returned from Poland where he spent time researching the history of his last name, from the Jewish half of his heritage. The artist learned that what was originally Chaimowitz has become Chimowitz over time, and he feels very connected to his Jewish roots and is proud to have his first-ever exhibition at a Jewish museum.

Also on view during Art Basel Season is the new exhibition Edna Glaubman: Retrospective (through December).

Edna Glaubman, Last Sunset, Florida, 1986, Estate of Rod Glaubman

This new museum retrospective includes 29 works by the late artist (1919-1986), including many works never shown before to the public. She was revered and beloved in Florida as one of the community’s favorite artists for portraits and landscapes.

Her subjects varied widely and included intimate family moments and social gatherings that are now part of the fabric of Jewish history in South Florida’s culture.

“The timeless quality of Edna Glaubman’s art, and her ideas and creative awakenings are as fresh and exciting today as they were when she created them,” said Susan Gladstone, the Executive Director of the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU.

“Our three exhibitions this year for Art Basel season are all original, new shows created by the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU,” adds Susan Gladstone.

“They represent the past, present and future of our Jewish Museum. These are works of art that all of our audiences are yearning for and thrilled to see, including the thousands of visitors from all over the world who are in town for Art Basel and our locals from Miami Beach and South Florida.”

Edna Glaubman, Rod and Joe, Blue Springs, circa 1970 Estate of Rod Glaubman

SPECIAL APPEARANCE BY DANIEL CHIMOWITZ: Sunday, Dec. 9 at 10:00 a.m.

On Sunday, December 9 the museum reprises its popular Annual Art Basel, Lox & Cream Cheese Brunch from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. for Art Basel week. This year, Daniel Chimowitz will be featured as guest-speaker and will present an exclusive fashion show. RSVP required in advance for December 9: RSVP here at this link ($25 for non-members / $18 for museum members, free for Art Basel VIP Cardholders).

The event will also feature a live performance by the internationally acclaimed Jazz pianist Tal Cohen. His unique piano style owes its roots to the Jewish folk songs and classical music he played in his formative years growing up in Gedera, Israel. Cohen was the winner of the Freedman Fellowship Award and won the Barry Harris Piano Competition in the United States. His recent album ‘Gentle Giants’ has received overwhelming attention including a 4 star review from the acclaimed Downbeat Jazz Magazine. Cohen has become a regular performer with iconic jazz figures and continues to tour the world performing his unique brand of improvised music.

6 Facts about Haji Ali Dargah You Didn’t Know

Haji Ali Dargah covers about 500 yards of the Arabian Sea. Mumbai city is well versed with this place and the royal structure holds immense importance in the lives of each individual. If you belong to a city of temples like Mangalore, you’d surely want to visit this famous dargah in Mumbai.

Here are some interesting facts and the history surrounding this admirable place.

  • It is named after the wealthy saint Pir Haji Ali Shah Bukhari, the greatest Muslim Saint. To make a pilgrimage to Mecca, he gave all of his fortune and possessions for noble deeds. During his journey to Mecca, he died, and the body in the coffin came back floating to Mumbai. The shrine was built at the same spot. In the year 1431, the mosque was built in his loving memory. The Dargah is about than 587 years old. Due to the impact of visitors and the saline winds, the structure is constantly eroding. Renovations were carried out in the years 1960 and 1964. After which, the upgrade was again started in the year 2008.
  • The tomb is based on the Indo Islamic architecture. It is situated 5oo metres from the coast and is built on a tiny islet. It is located in the vicinity of Worli, at the centre of the Worli Bay.
  • Almost 8000 visitors come to pay respects every day, and the most interesting fact is that not everyone who comes here is a Muslim. The causeway to the Dargah is not bound by any kind of railings. So the access to the spot majorly depends on the tides. During high tides, the causeway gets completely submerged in water making it inaccessible from the city.
  • On 26th July 1949, a storm hit the Mumbai city causing a great amount of destruction, but Haji Ali Dargah stood unharmed. Every building of the city suffered harm and loads of damage. Waves kept crashing the shore, and the people inside the dargah were scared that they would drown. But with the blessings of the saint, the waves bowed the walls without harming a single person in the dargah, and people returned back to their homes without any damage.
  • There is a story called the Pothole Story, which revolves around a miracle which happens every year. During the monsoon time, the city is all covered with potholes and rough roads. But the path of the mosque has never seen any damage for people to reach and pay tribute.
  • A feminist movement called ‘Haji Ali for all’ was launched by Bharatiya Muslim Mahila Andolan and Bhumata Brigade. The movement aimed to secure equal rights to pray. With the persistent efforts of the people, Supreme Court on 26th August ruled that women could enter the sanctum sanctorum.
  • There is lesser known tale surrounding the almighty’s dargah. Once the saint saw a poor woman holding a vessel and crying. She was crying because she had accidentally spilt the oil and was scared that the husband would beat her. To this, Haji Ali asked her to take him to that spot where she had spilt the oil. Upon reaching there, the oil came oozing out from the soil as soon as he jabbed a finger into the soil. The woman was overjoyed and filled her vessel. Later, Haji Ali Shah had a disturbing dream that he injured the Mother Earth. Soon after this, he got ill and asked his followers to put the coffin into the Arabian Sea. Miraculously, his casket just got stuck offshore of Worli where the Dargah was constructed. Haji Ali Dargah is one of the most visited mosques in Mumbai, and the history attached to the place is significant. So it’s your chance to see for real the purity of the place.