Posts tagged with "multimedia"

JEANETTE HAYES

(hot girl) summer featuring (hot girl) summer art by Jeanette Hayes

A Solo Exhibition Curated by Indira Cesarine

OPENING RECEPTION: July 23rd

EXHIBITION ON VIEW: July 23th – August 13th

THE UNTITLED SPACE

45 Lispenard Street, NYC 10013

RSVP events@untitled-space.com

The Untitled Space is pleased to present solo exhibition, “(hot girl) summer featuring (hot girl) summer art by Jeanette Hayes”. Curated by gallery director Indira Cesarine, the exhibit will open on July 23rd, 2019, and be on view through August 13th, 2019. Jeanette Hayes is a multidisciplinary visual artist known for her collage-like aesthetic. Her works address pop culture imagery with an adventurous style, often juxtaposing high and popular culture with images of the female form that provoke stereotypes with a mischievous liberation. “(hot girl) summer featuring (hot girl) summer art by Jeanette Hayes,” a title inspired by HOT GIRL MEG, explores a playful and light-hearted mentality about summertime through a series of graphite on paper drawings and oil paintings. Featuring conglomerated collages with iconic images spanning from Frida Kahlo to Minnie Mouse, each work speaks to her vision of a “hot girl summer.” 

Hayes stated of the exhibition theme, “With everyone currently entrenched in daunting political times, I decided to delve into a body of work that would be amusing and could give the viewer a break from real life. These fantasy collages are composed with art historical/ pop culture references and memes/imagery found on Instagram and TikTok laced together with my own unique creations. The viewer is encouraged to explore these works and discover details that invoke (or trigger) happiness and nostalgia, hope for a fun future (maybe a future as soon as later tonight) or even rage, if that is what you enjoy.” 

Hayes has participated in a number of successful solo and group exhibitions, including The Untitled Space group shows, “IRL: Investigating Reality” 2019, “EDEN” at SPRING/BREAK ART SHOW 2019, “SECRET GARDEN: The Female Gaze on Erotica” 2017, and “LIFEFORCE” 2016. This will be her first solo exhibition at the gallery. 

Jeanette Hayes (b. 1988) is a painter/multimedia artist based in New York. Originally from Chicago, Hayes moved to NYC and received a BFA from Pratt Institute. Her work addresses the traditional preservation of non-traditional technological and pop imagery through painting, video, digital manipulation, and Internet collages. Hayes’ interests include cultural phenomena and the confrontation of conventionality and subject matter. Her fascination with the amalgamation of images we each navigate through everyday and their correlations to civilization and ownership in 2019 has propelled her practice. With international solo shows in Sweden, Italy and Belgium, Hayes has also shown in New York Hayes at Half Gallery, the Hole, Regina Rex, Castor Gallery, Romeo, Bleecker Street Arts Club, the National Arts Club and more. 

Most recently, Hayes was curated by the Culture Corps to create a public art installation at the Hudson Yards, which is currently on view until November, 2019. Jeanette Hayes has made animated GIFs and videos for Proenza Schouler, CHANEL, Alexander Wang, Cynthia Rowley, Vogue and Opening Ceremony. She has received artist sponsorships from BlackBerry and Blick Art and was chosen by Purple magazine to create their artist book in 2016, which she titled “five”. Hayes has been featured in the New York Times, Vogue Japan, i-D, Complex Magazine, Interview Magazine, Dazed, the Coveteur, Purple Magazine, Paper Magazine, Playboy and TimeOut New York chose Hayes as one of the “5 most important new artists in New York City.” Jeanette Hayes lives and works in New York City. 

ABOUT THE UNTITLED SPACE:

The Untitled Space is an art gallery located in Tribeca, New York in a landmark building on Lispenard Street. Founded in 2015 by Indira Cesarine, the gallery features an ongoing curation of exhibits of emerging and established contemporary artists exploring conceptual framework and boundary pushing ideology through mediums of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video and performance art. The gallery is committing to exploring new ideas vis-à-vis traditional and new mediums and highlights a program of women in art as well as special events aligned with our creative vision. 

ABOUT CURATOR INDIRA CESARINE

Indira Cesarine’s work as a curator for The Untitled Space gallery includes solo shows for artists Sarah Maple, Rebecca Leveille, Alison Jackson, Fahren Feingold, and Kat Toronto aka Miss Meatface as well as group shows “EDEN” and “(HOTEL) XX” at SPRING/BREAK Art Show; ”SECRET GARDEN” presenting the female gaze on erotica; “SHE INSPIRES,” a group show of 60 artists exhibiting works honoring inspirational women; internationally-celebrated group shows “UPRISE/ANGRY WOMEN,” and “ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE” responding to the political climate in America since the election of Trump, as well as numerous other critically-acclaimed exhibitions.

Recent press on Indira Cesarine & The Untitled Space includes Vogue (US), Vogue Italia, CNN, Forbes, Newsweek, W Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, Teen Vogue, New York Magazine, i-D Magazine, Dazed and Confused, and The Huffington Post among many others. http://untitled-space.com/featured-press/

Exhibit link: http://untitled-space.com/hot-girl-summer-art-by-jeanette-hayes-a-solo-exhibition/

AMERICAN ART TO WEAR

Museum Presents Major Exhibition of Art to Wear

Off the Wall: American Art to Wear – November 10, 2019 – May 17, 2020

This fall, the Philadelphia Museum of Art presents Off the Wall: American Art to Wear, a major exhibition that highlights a distinctive American art movement that emerged in the late 1960s and flourished during the following decades. It examines a generation of pioneering artists who used body-related forms to express a personal vision and frames their work in relation to the cultural, historical and social concerns of their time. Focusing on iconic works made during the three decades between 1967 and 1997, the exhibition features over one hundred one-of-a-kind works by more than fifty artists. Comprised primarily of selections from a promised gift of Julie Schafler Dale, it will also include works from the museum’s collection and loans from private collections. Off the Wall: American Art to Wear is accompanied by a new publication of the same title, co-published by the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University Press.

Timothy Rub, the George D. Widener Director and CEO, said: “This exhibition will introduce to our visitors an exceptionally creative and adventurous aspect of American art which took the body as a vehicle for its expression. We are not only deeply grateful to Julie Dale for her extraordinary gifts and support of the museum but also see this as an opportunity to acknowledge the dynamic role she played in nurturing the growth and development of this movement.”

The champions of Art to Wear during the early years were a few forward-thinking museums, among them New York’s Museum of Contemporary Crafts (Museum of Art and Design), collectors, and galleries such as Sandra Sakata’s Obiko, founded in 1972 in San Francisco, and Julie Schafler Dale’s Julie: Artisans Gallery, which opened the following year on Madison Avenue in New York. For over 40 years, Dale’s gallery was a premier destination for presenting one-of-a-kind wearable works by American artists. Through her gallery installations and rotating window displays, she gave visibility to the Art to Wear movement. In 1986, she brought further recognition to the art form by publishing the seminal book Art to Wear—from which the title of this exhibition is taken—which provided in-depth profiles of artists alongside photographs by Brazilian fashion photographer Otta Stupakoff. Dale’s gallery closed in 2013.

Off the Wall is arranged in nine sections; the titles of some are derived from popular music of the ‘60s and ‘70s to suggest the wide-ranging concerns of the artists. The introductory section, The Times They Are A Changin’ (Bob Dylan, 1964), contains works by Lenore Tawney, Dorian Zachai, Claire Zeisler, Ed Rossbach, and Debra Rapoport to illustrate how textile artists in the late ‘50s and ‘60s liberated tapestry weaving from the wall, adapting it to three-dimensional sculptural forms inspired by pre-Columbian weaving. In 1969, a group of five students at Pratt Institute studying painting, sculpture, industrial design, multimedia, and graphic design taught each other how to crochet, leading to remarkable outcomes. Janet Lipkin, Jean Cacicedo, Marika Contompasis, Sharron Hedges, and Dina Knapp all created clothing-related forms that they would describe as wearable sculpture, thus establishing a cornerstone of the Art to Wear movement. A highlight in this section is a wool crochet and knit Samurai Top, 1972, by Sharron Hedges, modeled by the young Julie Dale for the book Creative Crochet, authored by two of the artist’s friends, Nicki Hitz Edson and Arlene Stimmel.

The next section, Good Vibrations (Beach Boys, 1966), traces the migration of many of these young artists from the East Coast to the West Coast where they joined California’s vibrant artistic community and connected with Sandra Sakata’s Obiko. A pair of colorful denim hand-embroidered mini shorts by Anna VA Polesny embroidered while traveling conveys this new youthful spirit. Pacific Rim influences are evident in the Japanese kimono form as a blank canvas offering infinite possibilities for pattern and design. Katherine Westpahl’s indigo blue resist-dyed cotton work, A Fantasy Meeting of Santa Claus with Big Julie and Tyrone at McDonald’s, 1978, and Janet Lipkin’s Mexico at Midday, a coat made in 1988 are exceptional examples. A range of counter-culture influences, evoking ceremony and spirituality, pervade this section.

Come Together (The Beatles, 1969) responds to the popular use of assemblage in art-making, especially the use of nontraditional materials. It also looks at the art of performance, reflected in Ben Compton and Marian Clayden’s Nocturnal Moth, 1974, inspired by Federico Fellini’s film La Dolce Vita (1960). “Mother Earth,” a nod to the publication Mother Earth News Magazine, looks to nature and environmental concerns while This Land is Your Land (Woodie Guthrie, 1940) explores iconic American imagery including reference to the American West and Native American cultures. Examples in this section include Joan Ann Jablow’s Big Bird cape, 1977, made entirely of recycled bird feathers, and Joan Steiner’s Manhattan Collar, 1979, which reimagines New York’s skyline in miniature.

Other Worlds explores fantasy and science fiction, two genres that offered young people an escape from the period’s cultural and political upheavals. Noteworthy here are works by Jean Cacicedo and Nina Huryn, both of whom riff on one of the most widely read English language books at the time, J.R.R. Tolkien’s trilogy Lord of the Rings (1965). Cacicedo responded with a portrait of Treebeard, 1973, a Tolkien character, while Huryn created her own fantasy world in Tree Outfit, with its flowing pants, loose shirt and leather sleeveless jacket containing forest and folklore imagery, a work made especially for Julie: Artisans Gallery in 1976. Other artists turned to dreams, such as Susanna Lewis, who created Moth Cape, 1979, in response to a nightmare that she had of a giant moth enveloping her body.

A section called I Am Woman (Helen Reddy, 1971) underscores the ways in which artists invoked feminism directly and indirectly in Art to Wear. Janet Lipkin, for example, invested her works with symbols of freedom while searching for new directions in her life, as seen in Bird Coat, 1972, Flamingo, 1982, and Transforming Woman, 1992. Other works like Combat Vest, 1985, by Sheila Perez, feature plastic toy soldiers as protective armor for the chest area, while Nicki Hitz Edson’s Medusa Mask, 1975, is a wild expression of fraught emotions surrounding the breakup of her marriage.

Colour My World (Chicago, 1970) reflects the buoyant rainbow color spectrum that was ubiquitous during this era. Recently published works on color theory by Johannes Itten and Josef Albers provided a cornerstone of the new art education. For Linda Mendelson, color, typography, and text became inseparable. She adapted Albers’s ideas relating to after-images in Big Red, and linked color progression with lines from a poem titled Coat by William Butler Yeats from which she drew inspiration. Other artists such as Tim Harding created an effect similar to impressionist brush strokes by slashing and fraying dyed fabrics, as seen in his colorful coat Garden: Field of Flowers, 1991.

The final section Everybody’s Talkin’ (Harry Nilsson, 1969) explores the use of text in Art to Wear. JoEllen Trilling engages in visual word play using common prepositions on a jacket, while Jean Cacicedo channels her grief over her father’s death using words taken from the bible that celebrated his life in My Father’s House, 1994.

Dilys Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costumes and Textiles, who organized the exhibition, said: “We are looking back at this period with a fresh lens through which to consider a uniquely American art form that continues to have a worldwide influence. With roots and connections in fine arts, fiber art, craft, performance and fashion, there are so many important artists to appreciate. For this reason I am delighted by the opportunity to cast a light on such extraordinary talents, including so many adventurous women who deserve much greater recognition.”

Publication
Off the Wall: American Art to Wear is accompanied by a new publication of the same name co-published the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University Press, co-authored by exhibition curators Dilys E. Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costumes and Textiles at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and independent textile scholar and curator Mary Schoeser, with a contribution written by Julie Schafler Dale. The volume provides the social, political, and artistic context for Art to Wear. ISBN 9780876332917.

Curators
Dilys Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costume and Textiles and Mary Schoeser, Independent Textile Historian and Curator

Support
This exhibition has been made possible by Julie Schafler Dale, PNC, The Coby Foundation, the Arlin and Neysa Adams Endowment Fund, the Center for American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and other generous donors. Credits as of July 8, 2019.

Social Media @philamuseum

Romy Nordlinger Is Alla Nazimova

NYC—PLACES! The Alla Nazimova Story will show at HERE’s Summer SubletSeries: Co-Op in New York City, at the HERE Mainstage Theatre on 145 Sixth Avenue whose entrance is on Dominick street. The event is from June 11th-15th at 8:30 pm with another showing on the 16th at 4 pm. General Admission tickets are $20.

“By opening our eyes to the past, we are better able to see our present.”-Nazimova

Escaping antisemitic Tsarist Russia, she was able to go on to achieve many artistic milestones. Nazimova starred on Broadway and then became Hollywood’s highest paid silent screen icon. She also went on to become the industry’s first female director and producer with the Shuberts naming a theater after her.

Unfortunately, because Nazimova defied moral and artistic codes of her time, she was forced into obscurity. PLACES!, a theatrical multimedia solo show, tells the story of Alla Nazimova, the forgotten lesbian trailblazer, iconoclast and the greatest star you’ve never heard of. Returning from the grave, Nazimova raises her voice, reclaiming our collective history, lighting the way to diversity.

“Sexism, racism, homophobia, ageism: Nazimova was fighting these contemporary struggles back in the 19th and early 20th Centuries, but alone and without a twitter account. In writing and performing PLACES!, I am setting the record straight and telling Nazimova’s magnificent story. We are all the stories we tell, and an artist is only dead when the last person to remember them dies.” -Romy Nordlinger

Romy Nordlinger wrote and performs The Alla Nazimova Story as a one woman show. The actress is well-known for several roles such as Bull (CBS), Lancelot by Steven Fechter, and, currently, the upcoming Lancelot feature film. Some more recent credits include Florence Foster Jenkins, the web series WOMG and the upcoming Indie short, A Separation.

Talkbacks are after the performances on Tuesday, June 11th, and Sunday, June 16th with Karynne Summars of the Hedonist Magazine as well as on Wednesday, 12 June with Trav SD.

For tickets and information visit www.here.org or call +1 212. 353.3101

11 Facts on CES 2019

11 Facts On The Backstage of CES 2019 Innovation Awards
 
The final list of the CES 2019 Innovation Awards Honorees has been revealed. And “Competition has been especially tough this year”, says one jury member. Here are ten surprising facts that can be deduced from the public data released by CES this year – via Pixminds: 
 
[1] Over 6,000 companies applied – less than 300 made it to the honoree bracket. 
 
[2] As opposed to last year, the CES jury decided to give each product no more than one innovation Award. 
 
[3] 270 honorees out of 300 were awarded one Innovation Award only. Some point out that they are one-shot startup stories that will not make it to the next CES edition, but their award can also highlight their star product promoting a wider range.
 
[4] Companies had to apply for one of the 29 product categories, some tougher than others: the “Computer Peripherals” category awarded 18 products, while only nine made it to the “Computer Accessories” honorees. 
 
[5] Industry leaders got stronger than ever this year, each of them releasing up to 17 award-winning products (see the industry leaderboard at the end of this note). 
 
[6] The industry leaderboard surprisingly misses big, ageless manufacturers (HP) as well as all of the software giants attempting to jump into the hardware field such as Google and Amazon. 
 
[7] Instead, the industry leaderboard is ruled by the usual South Korean and American giants such as Samsung (1st) and Motorola (5th), but Germany stays strong with their champion Bosch (4th).
 
[8] France jumped in the leaderboard above Germany and US with Pixminds (3rd). 
 
[9] Even though their electronics industries are amongst the strongest in the world, China, Japan and Israel did not make it to the leaderboard. 
 
[10] While every other company in the leaderboard has 10,000+ employees, surprisingly Pixminds only got 50. This is one more signal to the industry that innovation tends to come from small companies more than ever.

 
*** [11] With 17 awards, Samsung is the CES 2019 World Champion. The silver medal goes to MSI (12 awards). Finally, the third place goes to Pixminds (France) with 6 innovation awards.
 
ABOUT PIXMINDS
Pixminds is French group working in multimedia, specialized in human – machine interactions, and all their business applications. At Pixminds, we stand for innovation as we believe it is the seed of progress. The projects we develop are tightly linked to augmented reality and gaming. Because we come from gaming, we are convinced that comfort of use is essential for those who use daily digital tools such as computer peripherals, or gaming accessories. We work hard on improving the interface between the man and the machine. Through this point of view, innovation takes place both in the product (hardware and / or software) and in users’ behavior. Once one gets there, they need to step back from the hardware and understand what people truly need to make their day-to-day life a little more comfortable. 

Kevin Bourgeois: Wall Of Sound

Olsen Gruin announces Wall of Sound, an exhibition featuring music-inspired multimedia works by Kevin Bourgeois. The anticipated show comprises a curated selection of collage and acrylic compositions on wood panel.

Music has always been an intrinsic element in Bourgeois’ creative process and daily routine. “I consider it a universal cultural language with many diverse incarnations and forms,” he affirms. Wall of Sound turns its focus toward the visual art that complements the vast lexicon of music.

The phrase “Wall of Sound” was originally devised to describe Phil Spector’s production methods. According to Spector, the aim was “to create a dense aesthetic critical shorthand, mixed well enough that the audience would then perceive each of the different combinations as one distinct sound or form.” This concept mirrors the augmenting process Bourgeois implemented in creating this body of work.

Through collage Bourgeois seeks to transform the literal imagery of each album’s formal narrative. His process of embellishment and jigsaw remixing of multiple record jacket sources results in an alternative visual dialogue and imbues an abstracted or figurative aesthetic to be interpreted by the viewer.

“ONLY YOU” A Multimedia Series by Indira Cesarine

The Untitled Space is pleased to present multimedia series “ONLY YOU” by Indira Cesarine at SCOPE Art Show in Basel, Switzerland in partnership with ArtHelix Gallery and SHIM. Cesarine’s medium format photography, welded steel sculpture and video art will be on view in Booth A43 from June 12th to 17th for the duration of the fair.

“ONLY YOU” is a conceptual narrative portrait series chronicling a woman’s emotions as she traverses a metaphorical landscape of love, loss, abuse and betrayal. Each artwork is part of the greater narrative of her story. The series is based on autobiographical experiences of the artist. It was photographed on a medium format RZ camera as well as on HD video. The limited edition photographs and welded steel sculptures were completed in 2017 and unveiled last November at The Untitled Space gallery along with a dance performance by Bryn Cohn + Artists inspired by the series. Photography from the series was additionally featured at CICA Museum, South Korea as part of their January exhibition “Portrait 2018”.

The video art edition of “ONLY YOU” premiered at Art Basel Miami for an exhibition in collaboration with American Friends of The Louvre and Miami Art Museum. The video has additionally been screened internationally at exhibitions including “Factory Project” at London’s Red Bull Studios in collaboration with Graffik Gallery, at an event for Cannes Film Festival in France, and at the Big Screen Plaza in Chelsea, New York.

Indira Cesarine is a multimedia artist who works with photography, video, painting, printmaking and sculpture. A graduate of Columbia University with a triple major in Art History, French and Women’s Studies, she additionally studied art and photography at Parsons School of Design, International Center of Photography, School of Visual Arts, The Art Students League and New York Academy of Art. Cesarine had her first solo show at the age of sixteen at Paul Mellon Arts Center.

Empowering feminist themes are often the point of departure for Cesarine’s multi-sensory series. Her artwork questions the place of humanity in context with contemporary civilization and is often influenced by autobiographical content and women’s history at large. As a multi-disciplinarian artist she works across several mediums and techniques to convey a rich and diverse narrative, with an emphasis on thematic subject matter that engages a narrative of social discourse and art activism.

Her artwork has been featured internationally at many art galleries, museums and festivals, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Mattatuck Museum, CICA Museum, Getty Images Gallery, French Embassy Cultural Center, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Art Basel Miami, Cannes Film Festival and the International Festival Photo Mode to name a few. In 2014, her public art sculpture, “The Egg of Light” was exhibited at Rockefeller Center as part of the Fabergé Big Egg Hunt. Her work was recently auctioned at Sotheby’s New York for the annual “Take Home A Nude” art benefit.

“ONLY YOU, No 10″

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

“’ONLY YOU’ is an autobiographic series that I photographed and directed, working with a model to reenact sentiments I was feeling. This series tells the story not just of my emotional trauma, but that of many women who have been abused and betrayed by people they trusted, and how difficult it can be to process those emotions. In light of the #MeToo movement, many women are finding the strength to tell their stories. I have had many experiences that have crossed the line, in my personal life as well as throughout my career, and this series resonates with me as particularly relevant, a metaphorical mirror of how many women are feeling right now. You can feel the emotions in this series—they range from anger to sadness to disbelief to shame…frustration, fear— It’s an emotive series that focuses on the eyes as a portal.” – Indira Cesarine

“ONLY YOU, No 26”

ABOUT ARTHELIX + SHIMArtHelix, located in Bushwick, Brooklyn, presents solo and group art exhibitions and hosts lectures, symposia, and other cultural events. ArtHelix creates a meta-art space, a place where art is not only displayed and offered for sale, but also where it can be openly discussed and challenged, a hub or “helix” from which culture can be reimagined.

SHIM is a full service arts management company that helps artists present professional quality exhibitions by and for themselves without gallery commissions or lease. SHIM’s flagship location exists within ArtHelix gallery in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

For more info visit SCOPE-ART.COM