Posts tagged with "modeling"

Int’l Model + Influencer Angelina Galt

Q: How difficult was it to get signed to a major agency?

A: In some ways it was difficult and, in some ways, not. When I was starting my carrier and nobody has heard my name, it was difficult to get in the loop. But having worked really hard and built up a large portfolio I was able to sign with my first agency. After that first agency, other agencies have opened up doors to me. It all depends on the amount of work that you are willing you put in.

Q: Have you always had a mother agent? If so, what are the advantages of having one?

A: I didn’t always have a mother agency, but I am now signed to one on a short contract. Having a mother agent is very helpful in the beginning as it can connect you to agencies around the world. They are like the middleman.

Q: Where did you inherit your innate style?

A: I have always experimented with style from a young age. I went through almost every “phase” of dressing up that you can imagine and, in the end, found my sweet spot. My current style is a mix of everything I have tried and truly reflects my inner self. Style isn’t money and it can’t be bought with it.

Q: What was it like growing up in your hometown? Do you ever visit and do they recognize you?

A: I never quite got to grow up in my hometown. I was born in Russia then moved to Thailand at the age of 2. Thailand is a beautiful and unique place that has thought me things I would have never learned elsewhere. Sadly, I have not gotten a chance to Visit since we left to come to America. I hope to go back for a trip in the near future.

Q: How did you book your first cover? Through agency or publicist?

A: Neither, I booked my first cover through my manager. While we were building up my portfolio, a magazine reached out to us asking to have a shoot and interview, to which of course I said yes!

Q: What’s next for you?

A: I plan to sign with multiple agencies around the world. I also am currently working on my Angelina Galt foundation, that helps talented children reach their goals.

Q: Any community service involvement?

A: The Angelina Galt Foundation is a non-profit organization made only to raise money for children. While doing community service is a great way of giving back to the world, I wanted to start my own foundation.

Q: What words of advice would offer aspiring talent and models?

A: First of all, believe in yourself. Seriously. No matter what anybody says and no matter how many times you think you have failed. Keep fighting for it and it will be yours. Enjoy yourself at all times and be the best that you can. Don’t pretend to be anyone else to get noticed because you want people to fall in love with you. If you become your authentic self, people will be drawn to that kind of energy.

 

Angelina’s bio:

Angelina was born in Nokhodka, a port city in the Russian Far East. In her lifetime, she traveled a lot and even lived in different parts of the world. At the age of 1, Angelina moved with her parents to Thailand, where she studied two languages; English & Thai. Ever since she was a small girl, she has absorbed the culture and manners of high society from the nanny who used to work in the Royal family of Thailand.

Beginning at 7, Angelina studied in a British school. After moving to the US, she attended a private school that allowed her to balance school and her burgeoning modelling career. In addition to modelling, Angelina is actively involved in extracurriculars like swimming, dance, singing and horseback riding.

At 15, Angelina signed an exclusive contract with a modelling agency, while already having some major fashion bookings prior to that. As her star continues to rise, Angelina has a slew of major covers and spreads coming up. Angelina is looking forward to signing with a major agency, and developing her foundation for the arts, and announcing major projects on the horizon! For the latest updates and information, please log on to https://angelinagalt.com

Follow Angelina Galt on Instagram

Photo credit: JEAN-BAPTISTE FORT – @jbfort_photography

Cultivating Company Culture

TRAVEL JOURNALIST THOMAS WILMER INTERVIEWS 360 MAGAZINE PUBLISHER VAUGHN LOWERY

Small to medium sized business often fall short due to high turnover. Vaughn Lowery, Publisher of 360 Magazine, provides listeners with first-hand knowledge on the ever-shifting world of digital publishing and content creation through a youthful lens. Likewise with his innate ability to be accessible, he speaks to working in tandem with emerging generations and how their input could be detrimental to the survival of a brand.

LISTEN HERE

An Additional Conversation with 360 Magazine’s Publisher Vaughn Lowery

By Tara McDonough

If Vaughn Lowery was asked what his idea of success was 10 years ago, his answer would be very different from what it is today. He may have said that success means doing what he loves to do, being accomplished, or having a certain amount of material things.

“Success to me now is having a purpose in life and feeling passionate and fulfilled by it,” says Lowery.

Lowery got his first taste of the industry while interning for Vibe Magazine while on Summer vacation from Cornell University. His sister drove him into New York City every morning to drop him off and always advised him to be the first one at the office. One morning Lowery found himself alone with the publisher of the magazine at the time, Keith Clinkscales, which gave him the opportunity to speak with him one-on-one. It was due to his sister’s advice that he got the chance to do what no other intern would normally get to do.

After finishing up at Cornell in just three years, Lowery became an executive trainee with Saks Fifth Avenue. He was able to get along with everyone in the office and was doing great when he was called into his boss’s office one afternoon.

“She told me I was in the wrong business; that I was very charismatic and should try acting,” Lowery says, “but, I liked the path I was on at that time.”

It wasn’t until Lowery was asked by someone connected to the talent industry if he was a model that he truly considered breaking into the talent industry. Shortly after taking professional photos and getting them out to agencies, Lowery ended up with Ford Models. From there he did photoshoots, tv commercials, and ad campaigns, all while still working in outside sales at Aetna US Healthcare. Once he began modelling full time his face was in the pages of GQ, Harper’s Bazaar, Vogue, and Gap. By being around people of all different positions, primarily in the magazine publishing industry, Lowery came to understand how content was produced. It was right before the recession hit while he was living in LA that Lowery made the transition from modelling to the publishing industry.

It was his experience in modelling that inspired Lowery’s creation of the 360 Magazine. While working on any given shoot, Lowery was often one of just three or less black men. Often times he was the only black man on a set which drew his attention to the lack of representation in the media industry. Lowery’s goal for the 360 Magazine was that it would fill this niche and promote diversity across the publishing world, specifically the covers of its magazines.

For those wanting to work in the media industry, specifically in the publishing world, Lowery suggests starting from the ground up.

“Being self taught and learning as you go is something you need to be open to,” says Lowery, “Ask tons of questions, and learn everything you can from every position.”

Lowery warns that it’s important to be open and cordial to everyone, because you don’t know when your paths will cross again. Making connections and using them is how most people gain opportunities. He also adds that just by hanging out with people you’ll always learn something that you can apply to aspects of your work.  

Things in the industry have been changing and becoming more digitally focused since the beginning of 360 Magazine’s launch. The magazine was started during a time of e-zines, so it’s not a surprise that the website came first. Lowery had experience with creating websites from a young age so the move from print to digital was natural for him. It was clear to him where the industry was going.

“Print was getting costly, bookstores were looking dilapidated and even Barnes and Noble was focusing on their version of the tablet, the Nook,” says Lowery, “All the magazines were looking alike anyway.”

Print was still important though. Besides the fact that advertising agencies want to see a physical copy of a magazine before working with them, print is taken more seriously due to its cost. Other companies will be aware that a certain magazine has the funds to support itself if they have a print copy to show for it.

360 Magazine printed their first issue in 2009, but it was costly. Lowery began thinking that there had to be some other way to work with print. It was then that he decided to do print on demand publications. 360 Magazine linked with Blurb, which allowed anyone to order a print copy of the magazine right from our website. They’ve been distributing to them for 9 years now.

The magazine’s estimated circulation, which is based on print, is 110,000 from print on demand. This number doesn’t tend to move much, but most people end up reading 360 Magazine’s online articles through WordPress.

When asked what makes a media contributor most marketable, Lowery says that in this industry you need a social following and the ability to network. Being accessible and having a portfolio of published work is a great place to start as well.

Do it all,” Lowery says, “monetize, write, take photos, be on time, and take initiatives.”

The hardest thing about the industry in Lowery’s opinion is breaking into it and surviving on freelance jobs along the way. Writers should be prepared to sacrifice mentally, physically and financially. While working for a publication, Lowery says that writers need to do what they can to become a valuable asset to them. That way, a publication will be more likely to keep you on board and help you in the future.

As for internship positions at 360 Magazine, Lowery aims to teach interns everything that he didn’t learn. He’s assigns articles for interns to write, pushes them to network, has them do coverage and teaches them how to get published or to self-publish.

“We teach interns how to be resourceful and find themselves in the organization,” says Lowery.

When interns can bring business to the magazine, the magazine will bring business to them. Special assignment opportunities are available for interns who finish their program and are still looking to remain involved. Lowery says that while the magazine is specifically looking to groom editors, that if a publication wants to really pop, then they have to have a revolving door.

When asked what goals he has for the future of 360 Magazine, Lowery responded that he aims to keep it three dimensional with podcasts and web series.

“I want to be able to put the brand out to different countries and places in America,” says Lowery, Local presences would strengthen us.”

He also says that he’s interested in the possibility of a reality spin off or docu-series, as well as introducing more formal programs for educational purposes.

VAUGHN LOWERY:
360 Magazine
LinkedIn
Joe boxer TV Appearance
America’s Next Top Model Appearance
Sundance Film Trailer Appearance

Vaughn Lowery, art, 360 magazine, design, entertainer, Male model

Vintage Vanity

By Hannah Audrey Lowe x Vaughn Lowery

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Accessories by: April Lemmon, Yvonne Shultz, Treska, Judy Doyle, Pixie Mood, Trendz

Clothing by: Oddy, Mod Ref, Emtro, Umgee, Violet & Claire, Premise, Zanzea, Ark n Co

Creative Director, Wardrobe & Hair stylist: Hannah Audrey Lowe

Assistant to Creative Director: Seraphina Lowe

Photographer: Brody Calix

Makeup artist: Chelsea Miles

Models: Caitlyn Smith, Grace Offerdahl, Destiny Callahan

Design Studio: Alter’d Relics (Pamela Andrella)

HENRY FORD MUSEUM × PIXAR

Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation Presents The Science Behind Pixar Exhibition Offers A Unique Look Into the Pixar Process

Beginning October 14, 2017, visitors to Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation will be inspired by the science and technology behind some of the most beloved animated films and their characters, with The Science Behind Pixar. This interactive 10,000 square foot exhibition showcases the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) concepts used by the artists and computer scientists who help bring Pixar’s award-winning films to the big screen.

Created by the Museum of Science, Boston and Pixar Animation Studios, and featuring more than 40 interactive elements, The Science Behind Pixar demonstrates the technology that supports the creativity and artistry of Pixar’s storytellers. The exhibition is broken into eight distinct sections, each focusing on a step of the filmmaking process – Modeling, Rigging, Surfaces, Sets & Cameras, Animation, Simulation, Lighting, and Rendering – providing visitors with a unique view of the production pipeline and concepts used at Pixar every day. Visitors of all ages will engage in and learn about the filmmaking process through hands-on activities inspired by some of Pixar’s most treasured films, from the first-ever computer animated feature film Toy Story, which opened over two decades ago, to Pixar’s 2015 film Inside Out.

The Science Behind Pixar is a behind-the-scenes look at how our movies are made,” said Ed Catmull, president of Pixar and Disney Animation Studios. “The interactive exhibition gives people the opportunity to learn about the jobs our filmmakers do every day and tackle similar problems. It’s a great demonstration of how much creativity and imagination is involved in the science, technology, engineering, art and math thinking essential to our filmmaking process.”

The Science Behind Pixar offers a variety of hands-on activities that empower visitors to imagine the STEM concepts behind Pixar’s films in a fun, engaging format. To better understand the science and math that goes into creating the worlds and characters of Pixar’s films, visitors will hear first-hand from members of the studios’ production teams. They will also be invited to experience different roles within the production pipeline, through screen-based activities and physical interactive exhibits. In Sets & Cameras, for example, visitors will discover how a bugs-eye view was achieved for A Bug’s Life, through camera angles and large-set design within the computer. Visitors will envision how digital sculptures are created based on sketches from artists in Modeling, and explore Lighting to solve challenges similar to what Pixar artists faced in creating animated water with virtual light in Finding Nemo. Rigging showcases how the models are given a virtual skeleton to enable the animators to add movement, and in Surfaces, visitors can immerse themselves in the techniques behind adding color and texture to every surface in a film. Visitors will also have the opportunity to take their photo with human-size recreations of many of their favorite Pixar film characters, including Buzz Lightyear, Dory, Mike and Sulley, Edna Mode, and WALL•E.

The Science Behind Pixar is presented locally by Meijer and sponsored by Ford Motor Company Fund and Connections Academy. Tickets for members are $5. Non-member ticket prices include admission to the museum and are $26 for adults (12-61), $20.75 for youth (3-11), $24 for seniors (62+) and children 2 and under are free. To purchase tickets, visit www.thehenryford.org


About The Henry Ford

The Henry Ford in Dearborn, Michigan is an internationally-recognized history destination that explores the American experience of innovation, resourcefulness and ingenuity that helped shape America. A national historic landmark with an unparalleled Archive of American Innovation, The Henry Ford is a force for sparking curiosity and inspiring tomorrow’s innovators. Nearly 1.8 million visitors annually experience its five attractions: Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation, Greenfield Village, Ford Rouge Factory Tour, Benson Ford Research Center and The Henry Ford Giant Screen Experience. A continually expanding array of content available online provides anytime, anywhere access. The Henry Ford is also home to Henry Ford Academy, a public charter high school which educates over 500 students a year on the institution’s campus. In 2014, The Henry Ford premiered its first-ever national television series, The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation, showcasing present-day change-makers and The Henry Ford’s artifacts and unique visitor experiences. Hosted by news correspondent and humorist, Mo Rocca, this Emmy®-winning weekly half-hour show airs Saturday mornings on CBS. For more information please visit our website thehenryford.org.

Support for The Science Behind Pixar

The Science Behind Pixar is funded through support by Google, members of the Science Museum Exhibit Collaborative (SMEC), Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

About Pixar Animation Studios

Pixar Animation Studios, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company, is an Academy Award®-winning film studio with world-renowned technical, creative and production capabilities in the art of computer animation. Creator of some of the most successful and beloved animated films of all time, including “Toy Story,” “Monsters, Inc.,” “Cars,” “The Incredibles,” “Ratatouille,” “WALL•E,” “Up,” “Toy Story 3,” and “Brave,” the Northern California studio has won 30 Academy Awards and its films have grossed more than $10 billion at the worldwide box office to date.
This exhibition was developed by the Museum of Science, Boston in collaboration with Pixar Animation Studios.