Posts tagged with "millennials"

Wlabs smart oven, food network, kim sing theatre, 360 MAGAZINE, vaughn Lowery, katie lee

WLabs Smart Oven w/ Katie Lee

By Krishan Narsinghani × Vaughn Lowery

As of late, 360 MAGAZINE paid a visit to the newly imagined Kim Sing Theatre (once the 1926 Vaudeville), which houses an event space, gallery, courtyard as well as hotel.

At this venue, we joined Food Network star, Katie Lee, for the WLabs’ smart oven first look and tasting. Try cooking with an appliance that manages it all for you. Literally, the smart oven can tell what’s inside and let you know when it’s done using a new camera and sensor detector technologies. Witnessing Katie Lee fit a whole chicken inside this 13.5” H x 19.5” W x 21” with a magnetic thermometer (conveniently sticks on the side of the unit) was a shock, more so, that she was alerted by the app on her phone it was ready. Not to mention, the counter space you’ll save in a small galley kitchen within an urbane habitat. De-hydrate limes for handcrafted cocktails, roast asparagus or reheat/bake a 12″ pizza. The personal assistant makes your life in kitchen that much easier. So, take a long shower or a soothing bath with no worries.

In short, the innovative WLabs Smart Oven is ideal for a budding executive who resides in a metropolis and is always in transit swinging from city to urban center while on various assignments. Or, for empty nesters who like to entertain intimate yet memorable parties where this appliance will surely be the center attention.

Merely 2,000 of these bad boys are available for pre-order here.

Wlabs smart oven, food network, kim sing theatre, 360 MAGAZINE, vaughn Lowery, katie lee Wlabs smart oven, food network, kim sing theatre, 360 MAGAZINE, vaughn Lowery, katie lee Wlabs smart oven, food network, kim sing theatre, 360 MAGAZINE, vaughn Lowery, katie lee Wlabs smart oven, food network, kim sing theatre, 360 MAGAZINE, vaughn Lowery, katie lee

Rnw garments, 360 magazine,Raphael Na’te Walton

RNW Garments

RNW Garments is a Los Angeles based independent street wear label founded in 2011. The brand philosophy “Since Birth” is born out of their tagline NO GUTS, NO GLORY. Hailing from South Central LA, designer Raphael Na’te Walton has organically grown RNW Garments to be a brand for people of all walks of life no matter their ancestry or background.

For all the old and young souls still chasing their glory, to those who have achieved the greatest achievements, but strive for more; RNW Garments embody the hustler spirit and serves as a symbol of that fire within all of us to chase our own glory.

RNW currently offers traditional street wear pieces such as tees, hoodies, jackets and headwear but will soon transition into cut and sew production which will allow founder Raphael Na’te Walton for the opportunity to bring the brand to new heights.

www.rnwgarment.com
@rnwgarments

Ethan solu, 360 MAGAZINE

Ethan Solu

A Model To Watch

Ethan Solu, half Turkish and half American, was born on March 6, 2000. He was brought up and raised in Morro Bay, California on the Central Coast with three brothers. His friends refer to him as ‘E-Sol.’

As of late, Ethan has extensively traveled (to Turkey and many divisions of Europe).

Ethan spends most of the year attending a local junior college where he takes core curriculum classes.

In his spare time, he spends most of it outdoors or near the ocean. He enjoys surfing, kayaking, fishing and diving. He also enjoys exploring California and spends time searching for new surfing and camping spots which he has never experienced. One of his favorite places to explore is Big Sur. He reckons it his backyard due to its proximity to his hometown.

Besides surfing, Ethan likes playing team sports – water polo, volleyball and swimming. He and his brother spend a heap of time in the gym playing basketball and working out.

Measurements:

Height: 6’3

Weight: 170lbs

Jacket: 40L

Shirt: Large

Neck: 15.5

Sleeve: 27

Waist: 32

Inseam: 34-35

Shoe: 12.5

Look Model Agency [SF]

Swatch, 360 MAGAZINE, swatch watches, 360

SWATCH BIG BOLD

Inspired by bold ideas, designed for even bolder personalities: We are proud to introduce our brand new Swatch BIG BOLD collection featuring six different watch models. With a kick from urban streetwear, each BIG BOLD is a statement piece boasting a striking 47mm watchcase. This product line calls out for those who are not afraid to put themselves upfront and who are proud to be different. Swatch BIG BOLD is an attitude, a mindset, a way of being in the world. It is a kind of swagger that is irreverent, confident, and entirely unexpected. It longs for those that embrace being noticed.

GoLite

Winner of a Backpacker® Editors’ Choice Green Award and an Outdoor Industry Innovation Award for sustainability! The GoLite ReGreen Windshell leverages 100% recycled polyester made from Da.Ai -Certified green bottles (which typically end up in landfills). By making the fabric from recycled bottles we save over 50% of the energy which would normally have been required to make fabric. By not dying the fabric, we further reduce water consumption by up to 80%.

BOTTLE COUNT: 20

Why having a social media platform is right for your business

The one thing entrepreneurs, small business owners, large and small corporations around the globe have in common is the desire to grow and thrive in their line of business. In the last decade alone social media has significantly changed how people connect and communicate, with approximately over 2.4billion users worldwide. Keeping this in mind, growing one’s business simply boils down to building a strong brand online because that’s where the consumers are.

Let’s go through a few ways in which social media is good for business.

Allows you to adapt to shifts in consumer attention

Prior to the social media boom, businesses would communicate to their potential customers by paying to have their commercial ads on magazines, radio, and television. The non-free element of these platforms made it more difficult for startups to reach an audience and most would rely on ‘word of mouth’ to market their business. Today, online platforms are free, interactive and have an uncanny ability to reach a niche audience. As a business, you can constantly use surveys to find out if the consumers’ needs have changed or evolved and develop a marketing strategy to target your audience and meet their needs.

There is a lot of demographic data readily available on social media networks; analyzing this data can help you develop marketing tools that your audience is better likely to receive.

Social media is interactive

Social media allows you to have real-time interactions with your customers, and you can respond to comments and questions on your brand while on a grocery line or having a coffee. There are many existing online platforms which one can use to interact with consumers making it difficult for businesses to survive on all of them as this requires time. Which begs the question, how do I identify the right social media platform to use?

• Choose a platform your customers are on: A business should only exist on a platform that their audience is in to ensure value adding interactions. This allows you to ‘cull the herd’ in a manner of speaking, access and respond to your target consumer needs

• First, ensure your marketing strategy is better than your competitors and apply it on a platform that is comfortable for you. For example, if you are unable to create compelling short ads or hire someone to do it for you then twitter may not be the best platform to use; a business needs to play to its strengths. However, one cannot ignore core platforms which are essential for your business to be on such as LinkedIn and Instagram because of the attention such platforms receive.

• Choose a platform that allows you to have real-time interactions with people either through face to face marketing of group chats. This could be a strategic way to building lasting relationships and connections and leverage these connections for your business.

Interactive features like monitoring apps alert you to any bad reviews your business may be getting and allows you to respond adequately and promptly to avoid loss of sales and brand damage. It also lets you know how your competitors are doing, and this will enable you to make strategic business decisions if niches have been identified.

Offers many features

Popular social media platforms require the user to be active in order to gain a large following and subsequent likes. So, if you are unable to continually have an online presence, ‘cheat apps’ are your best bet. Let’s use the example of Instagram which is currently the most visited social network. The app offers individuals and businesses services such as Insta likes free which gives the perception that your posts are popular and value adding to your audience. Instagram auto likes are a good marketing technique in the sense that it is easy to use and time-saving. A business simply has to submit an Instagram photo or URL and go about day-to-day activities while the system ensures that you receive as the number of like you requested. This feature not only brings traffic to the products and services your business offers but also gives you an edge over your competitors.

Advantages of auto like services

• It is time-saving. Once you subscribe and choose a package that works for you, the system does the rest while you can focus on other ways of growing your brand

• It is a great tool for entrepreneurs. It helps build the client base as people are more likely to take time to look and follow URLs of popular posts.

• It allows a business to increase sales while growing and promoting it’s their brand. The free auto likes will get the attention of consumer who will in turn like and sometimes share the post. This increases the likelihood of getting lifetime customers and reaching new audiences.

• It is affordable. Some packages are free allowing business to save on monetary resources while steadily growing their brand.

Allows you to partner with influencers

A social media influencer is an individual with a large online following that trusts their judgment and can easily help you improve brand visibility. These group of people often guide their followers purchasing choices by simply talking or sharing links and images about the products and services you offer. Since their opinions are trusted, your brand credibility soars, and this translates into sales.

In some instances business hit the gold mine and go viral through these partnerships. Consumers will share content they deem worthy with their friends and followers who will also do the same and before you know it your business has been exposed to millions of people online.

In conclusion

A lot has changed over the years; a business’s ability to adapt to these changes will determine whether it will succeed or fail. The use of social media to market one’s business is one such change. Social networks undoubtedly have a wide range of benefits to a company from increasing brand awareness to increased sales, and this makes it a vital component to business continuity.

Cultivating Company Culture

TRAVEL JOURNALIST THOMAS WILMER INTERVIEWS 360 MAGAZINE PUBLISHER VAUGHN LOWERY

Small to medium sized business often fall short due to high turnover. Vaughn Lowery, Publisher of 360 Magazine, provides listeners with first-hand knowledge on the ever-shifting world of digital publishing and content creation through a youthful lens. Likewise with his innate ability to be accessible, he speaks to working in tandem with emerging generations and how their input could be detrimental to the survival of a brand.

LISTEN HERE

An Additional Conversation with 360 Magazine’s Publisher Vaughn Lowery

By Tara McDonough

If Vaughn Lowery was asked what his idea of success was 10 years ago, his answer would be very different from what it is today. He may have said that success means doing what he loves to do, being accomplished, or having a certain amount of material things.

“Success to me now is having a purpose in life and feeling passionate and fulfilled by it,” says Lowery.

Lowery got his first taste of the industry while interning for Vibe Magazine while on Summer vacation from Cornell University. His sister drove him into New York City every morning to drop him off and always advised him to be the first one at the office. One morning Lowery found himself alone with the publisher of the magazine at the time, Keith Clinkscales, which gave him the opportunity to speak with him one-on-one. It was due to his sister’s advice that he got the chance to do what no other intern would normally get to do.

After finishing up at Cornell in just three years, Lowery became an executive trainee with Saks Fifth Avenue. He was able to get along with everyone in the office and was doing great when he was called into his boss’s office one afternoon.

“She told me I was in the wrong business; that I was very charismatic and should try acting,” Lowery says, “but, I liked the path I was on at that time.”

It wasn’t until Lowery was asked by someone connected to the talent industry if he was a model that he truly considered breaking into the talent industry. Shortly after taking professional photos and getting them out to agencies, Lowery ended up with Ford Models. From there he did photoshoots, tv commercials, and ad campaigns, all while still working in outside sales at Aetna US Healthcare. Once he began modelling full time his face was in the pages of GQ, Harper’s Bazaar, Vogue, and Gap. By being around people of all different positions, primarily in the magazine publishing industry, Lowery came to understand how content was produced. It was right before the recession hit while he was living in LA that Lowery made the transition from modelling to the publishing industry.

It was his experience in modelling that inspired Lowery’s creation of the 360 Magazine. While working on any given shoot, Lowery was often one of just three or less black men. Often times he was the only black man on a set which drew his attention to the lack of representation in the media industry. Lowery’s goal for the 360 Magazine was that it would fill this niche and promote diversity across the publishing world, specifically the covers of its magazines.

For those wanting to work in the media industry, specifically in the publishing world, Lowery suggests starting from the ground up.

“Being self taught and learning as you go is something you need to be open to,” says Lowery, “Ask tons of questions, and learn everything you can from every position.”

Lowery warns that it’s important to be open and cordial to everyone, because you don’t know when your paths will cross again. Making connections and using them is how most people gain opportunities. He also adds that just by hanging out with people you’ll always learn something that you can apply to aspects of your work.  

Things in the industry have been changing and becoming more digitally focused since the beginning of 360 Magazine’s launch. The magazine was started during a time of e-zines, so it’s not a surprise that the website came first. Lowery had experience with creating websites from a young age so the move from print to digital was natural for him. It was clear to him where the industry was going.

“Print was getting costly, bookstores were looking dilapidated and even Barnes and Noble was focusing on their version of the tablet, the Nook,” says Lowery, “All the magazines were looking alike anyway.”

Print was still important though. Besides the fact that advertising agencies want to see a physical copy of a magazine before working with them, print is taken more seriously due to its cost. Other companies will be aware that a certain magazine has the funds to support itself if they have a print copy to show for it.

360 Magazine printed their first issue in 2009, but it was costly. Lowery began thinking that there had to be some other way to work with print. It was then that he decided to do print on demand publications. 360 Magazine linked with Blurb, which allowed anyone to order a print copy of the magazine right from our website. They’ve been distributing to them for 9 years now.

The magazine’s estimated circulation, which is based on print, is 110,000 from print on demand. This number doesn’t tend to move much, but most people end up reading 360 Magazine’s online articles through WordPress.

When asked what makes a media contributor most marketable, Lowery says that in this industry you need a social following and the ability to network. Being accessible and having a portfolio of published work is a great place to start as well.

Do it all,” Lowery says, “monetize, write, take photos, be on time, and take initiatives.”

The hardest thing about the industry in Lowery’s opinion is breaking into it and surviving on freelance jobs along the way. Writers should be prepared to sacrifice mentally, physically and financially. While working for a publication, Lowery says that writers need to do what they can to become a valuable asset to them. That way, a publication will be more likely to keep you on board and help you in the future.

As for internship positions at 360 Magazine, Lowery aims to teach interns everything that he didn’t learn. He’s assigns articles for interns to write, pushes them to network, has them do coverage and teaches them how to get published or to self-publish.

“We teach interns how to be resourceful and find themselves in the organization,” says Lowery.

When interns can bring business to the magazine, the magazine will bring business to them. Special assignment opportunities are available for interns who finish their program and are still looking to remain involved. Lowery says that while the magazine is specifically looking to groom editors, that if a publication wants to really pop, then they have to have a revolving door.

When asked what goals he has for the future of 360 Magazine, Lowery responded that he aims to keep it three dimensional with podcasts and web series.

“I want to be able to put the brand out to different countries and places in America,” says Lowery, Local presences would strengthen us.”

He also says that he’s interested in the possibility of a reality spin off or docu-series, as well as introducing more formal programs for educational purposes.

VAUGHN LOWERY:
360 Magazine
LinkedIn
Joe boxer TV Appearance
America’s Next Top Model Appearance
Sundance Film Trailer Appearance

Vaughn Lowery, art, 360 magazine, design, entertainer, Male model

GiGi Cesare

GiGi, is a passionate award-winning actress and recording artist with multicultural roots. She is currently in the studio recording her debut tracks with hopes to emerge as the first teen EDM Trap Pop recording artist. GiGi’s sound is unique and captivating and her stunning vocals are just as intuitive. Influenced by pop stars as diverse as Lil Miquela, Post Malone and George Michael, GiGi has conceived a unique blend of R&B, soul and trap pop music with a twist. Even at the young age of 13, she is already making headlines, not only as a musician, but also as an actress. Last year, she received an unprecedented nomination at the Imagen Awards for Best Actress in a feature film competing against fellow nominees Salma Hayek and Eva Longoria. She plays principal roles in two films currently in post production, a dramatic comedy Space Captain and Callista and comedy, Go With The Flow. Learn more about GiGi, and do not miss out on her upcoming releases.

For all things GiGi go here.

Young Bae

A native of Seoul, South Korea, Young Bae’s childhood reads like a painful chapter of Oliver Twist. Using her innate talent – art – to overcome years of poverty, homelessness and abuse, Young managed to escape.

Young’s mom, an artist herself, was consistently unable to provide and care for her children and members of their community refused to volunteer assistance. Young recalls the cultural reaction to her family’s suffering with clarity,

“Korea is a materialistic country,” confides Young, now proprietor of the marquee Diamond Tattoos shop in New York City’s Times Square. “No matter how hard you work, it is hard to break away from poverty – nobody gives you an opportunity. If you’re poor, you’re poor for life. They treat the less fortunate like shit, hence I couldn’t talk to anybody about how I was living – not even my best friend. So I kept it all a secret, as best I could.”

Young did her best to mix in with other more privileged kids, even as she and her family moved around in church basements, abandoned houses and even a shipping container throughout her teenage years. “I may have been homeless with no money, but I was always fresh and fashionable,” says the self-taught tattoo queen has come a long way to now ink high-profile clientele and eager fans of the drama-filled show, “Black Ink.” “When my family didn’t have access to a shower I would clean up at public restrooms every morning. I’d also get hand-me-down-clothes from church and create my own fashions, or at least I tried to. My teachers suspected I was poor because there were things I couldn’t pay for, but for the most part I think I flew under the radar.”

She didn’t fly under the radar though when it came to her talent, her teachers and classmates acknowledged her ability to sketch, draw as well as paint. Young began receiving accolades for her fabrications, using the sales to buy basic necessities.

Young was able to land a partial academic scholarship to a college where she continued to hone her craft until she was ready to leave Korea.

“New York is an artist’s city,” says the Chugye University graduate, “so it just made sense.”

They say if you can make it in New York, you can make it anywhere and the bonafide hustler Young took the motto to heart. In 2007, the 22-year-old made a beeline for Koreatown in Manhattan, touching down with just $80 and a student visa to study English, she landed a job at a local nail salon.

Despite a language barrier, she wouldn’t stop there. Young continued job hunting, getting jobs at restaurants, jewelry shops, even illegally hawking her art in New York’s famed Union Square. All this to make her share of the rent for a small place with roommates in New Jersey.

On the way to the tattoo shop in NYC, the neon lights of New York City brightly shined on the other side of the Lincoln Tunnel.

Tattooing was illegal in South Korea so Young had no experience. “I walked in, took a look around at the tattoo sketches on the wall, and thought, hey, I could do this. So I offered the shop owners a barter: in exchange for giving me a shot I would clean their shop for free. They agreed.” With that, her apprenticeship commenced.

In no time, Young became confident in her skills and moved to another shop where she could demand a tattoo artist’s wages. Quickly becoming the most requested artist in the shop, Young decided look into owning and operating her own business.

“I rented this little ratty spot on 46th Street in Times Square. It was literally a storage room in the back of an eyebrow threading shop. I got licensed, worked like three additional jobs to afford the $1000/month overhead and scoured the area to find shelves, paint and other stuff to decorate. I upholstered my first tattoo chairs with fake leather I found on the street. Then every day I’d go hold up this human-sized sign advertising my shop, and miraculously people showed up. Eventually so many showed up, I quickly outgrew the space!”

With Young’s growing credibility and reputation among fellow artists throughout the tri-state area, it was no wonder that reality TV show producers eventually came calling.

“My shop might not have been the fanciest, but my work was good and news about me began to spread quickly. It kept getting bigger and busier every year,” she says.

Young was delighted to join VH1’s popular show “Black Ink Crew: New York” during its fifth season. Heading into its seventh season, Young Bae is a fascinating and loveable character to watch.

Through it all, Young gives God the credit for not just where she is today but where’s she’s headed, “I had faith that poverty, homelessness and abuse wouldn’t be the end of my story. I went through all of what I did so I could come out on top on the other end and eventually go on to help others who are vulnerable like I was. There is greatness waiting for us all and I’m determined to live and share my best life now.”

Currently, Young Bae is working on an athleisure line 2one2 and a book sharing her life experiences.

Additional information can be found on her wikipedia.

Chris Lake × Fisher

By Michelle Pisnoy × Vaughn Lowery

6,000 EDM-loving college students filed into the Shrine Expo Hall Thursday prepared to dance the night away. The floor and balcony were packed as Chris Lake and Fisher took to the stage at their sold out show. Throughout the evening, a horde of fans pulsed to every beat the B2B DJ’s created.

At 10:00 pm, the mob of music lovers got rambunctious in anticipation of their performance. Minutes afterwards, the lights were dimmed and the audience began to cheer. Bright lights flashed, the beat began to intensify and the EDM lovers got even rowdier. Fisher and Chris Lake came out and started to perform mixes of different songs. The duo kept the audience engaged by switching between different beats and songs like “Crowd Control.” As soon as the track commenced, the fans began jumping up and down as well as singing along to the lyrics.

Chris Lake then played hit song, “Turn Off the Lights,” featuring Alexis Roberts. The LED lighting technology was in succinct to every beat of the record. At times, almost blinded the hypersensitive congregation, but they didn’t appear to mind. The night came to a culmination when Fisher played “Losing It.” He added synthetic melodies which made it more enchanting than the studio version. The crowd absolutely lost it, singing at the top of their lungs until the lights turned back on.