Posts tagged with "Mexican"

Refinery29’s Style Out There

WATCH NOW: EPISODE FOUR OF REFINERY29’s ORIGINAL SERIES

Style Out There

Style Out There, Refinery29’s award-winning video series is back with the fourth episode of season 3. With over 26 million views, host and journalist Connie Wang digs into the way clothing has given women a way to speak out, look within, and identify the forces that limit their potential. Through these stories, Wang discovers the powerful way fashion illuminates social and political issues, ranging from the connection between sexy clothing and sexual assault to instances when cultural appropriation can actually be both useful and productive.

Episode Four of Style Out There is Now Available on Refinery29.com

In episode four, Connie Wang explores the all-female teams in the equestrian sport Escaramuza, which is a treasured Mexican tradition melding riding, fashion, and national identity. But for the athletes living in America, there’s an added vulnerability in literally wearing their Mexican pride on their sleeves.  

Episode Four Highlights

On Making Women Confident

“I say it’s contributed because practicing Charrería, and more in the United States, it magnifies and gives you a confidence as a Mexican to be able to open all the doors, remove all the barriers and not fear anything.” – Frine, Coach, Real De Valle

On Escaramuza Telling a Story from the Past

“Charging through the arena like true warriors Las Coronelas De Illinois are poised, powerful and in control. As I watch them spin in layers of crinoline Vision of Adelitas from centuries ago it occurs to me that, today, this sport and its pageantry really tells a story about the grace and bravery of these women who dedicate their lives to it.”

“On top of their horses, in these dresses, Escaramuza like Mireya are proudly announcing who they are and where they belong.” – Connie Wang, Host

On the Dress Being a Symbol of Pride

“Ever since the elections,  I do feel that wearing the Escaramuza dress is more than just  wearing team gear it’s more like sending a message and proving that I am proud of being Mexican-American .” – Mireya, Las Coronelas De Illinois

Style Out There will premiere new episodes every week on Refinery29’s YouTube channel, exploring Japanese Cholas subculture in Nagoya, the rise of Afrofuturism across the globe, the American Escaramuzas, and Jamaica’s dancehall queens.

Please let us know if you are able to share this with your readers or if you would like to speak with Connie about the series or the reporting.

About Refinery29

Refinery29 is the leading media and entertainment company focused on women. Through a variety of lifestyle stories, original video programming, social, shareable content, and live experiences, Refinery29 provides its audience with the inspiration and tools to discover and pursue a more independent, stylish, and informed life. Please visit www.refinery29.com/en-us, www.refinery29.com/en-ca, www.refinery29.uk and www.refinery29.de for more information and to browse content.

Mojo Nomad Central

Mojo Nomad Central – a ground-breaking concept designed to turn the traditional hotel model on its head- will open this September on Queens Road Central in the heart of Hong Kong. The property is the second to open from the Mojo Nomad brand, Hong Kong’s first hotel concept with shared working spaces, and a member of the Ovolo Hotels group.

“Following the unprecedented success of Mojo Nomad Aberdeen, on the western shore of Hong Kong Island, we’re excited to unveil a second Mojo Nomad property in Hong Kong, this time in the city’s bustling Central District,” says Girish Jhunjhnuwala, the visionary behind the Mojo Nomad concept, and founder & CEO of Ovolo Hotels. The edgy, design-driven concept draws on the hotelier’s desire to make a difference. “We are giving modern travelers access to a multi-use space where they can be productive, collaborate, seek adventure and experience new things,” continued Girish.

The first of its kind in the region, the Mojo Nomad concept combines a mix of designer rooms, from private to accommodation options for families, groups and friends, paving the way for a new type of value-driven design hospitality. Mojo Nomad’s communal spaces encourage guests to connect with new people and ideas, tapping into a thriving demographic of explorers and addressing the changing demands of the ever-evolving traveler.

The new Mojo Nomad Central offers a total of 56 guest rooms ranging from size S to XL; two of the property’s rooms will offer shared accommodations. Adhering to the brand’s commitment to integrating the latest in technology and design, each room is equipped with multiple USB and traditional plug sockets, as well as international adapters. Shared rooms are fitted with individual televisions and Bluetooth headphone capabilities, as well. A flexible-use space on the property’s second floor will offer a refreshment bar and shared kitchen with additional working and lounge areas. On the third floor, the gym offers TRX equipment, punching bags, yoga mats and more.

A two-story Mexican eatery, Te Quiero Mucho, will serve share-style plates and margaritas alongside a broad selection of artisanal tequilas. The bar, which also serves as the hotel’s reception desk, is decked out with eye-catching neon.

“Our inspirational new hotel collection is designed for those seeking a better way of living. At Mojo Nomad, guests are able to unite around common interests and enjoy a unique style of community living, which values openness and collaboration without compromise. Whether your stay be long or short, you’ll be a part of our community,” concluded Girish.

For more information about Mojo Nomad, visit www.mojonomad.com. For more information about the Ovolo Hotels group, visit www.ovolohotels.com.

ABOUT OVOLO HOTELS

Ovolo Hotels is an independent hospitality company that owns and operates a collection of individually designed hotels. Founded in 2002, the company now runs four hotels in Hong Kong and six hotels in Australia, including in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Canberra. Ovolo also recently launched a new brand, Mojo Nomad, in Aberdeen Harbour, Hong Kong. Mojo Nomad is a cohabitation concept for global nomads that combines travel, lifestyle and community at its core and will be entering the Australian market in the near future.

ABOUT MOJO NOMAD

Established in 2017, Mojo Nomad is a community for global travelers who seek a new way of living. The brand’s vision is to establish a global brand that will consistently go beyond traditional hospitality concepts which allows residents to live, work and travel in an effortless home-feel environment. The Mojo Nomad micro-living hotel concept offers collaborative and fun environments that expose its residents to new people, new ideas and new experiences. Mojo Nomad strives to encourage residents to be active creators and unite them around a common interest to share space, resources, and activities, ultimately inspiring them to contribute creatively and intellectually to the world around them.

DaniLeigh

When the end of Summer hits, the desire to rewind time kicks in, reliving every magical moment from the season’s past. It’s a vibe that newcomer DaniLeigh has managed to encapsulate in her debut EP Summer With Friends, coming soon. The 22-year-old singing and dancing phenomenon cut her teeth in the business when she directed a music video for her late mentor, Prince. She enhanced her buzz with back-to-back jams “Play” (featuring Kap G) and “Lurkin’”, and is here to continue her mission of making music that both sounds and feels good.

The South Florida native had music in her blood, singing from a young age. As an early teen, DaniLeigh recorded YouTube covers of songs like Musiq Soulchild’s “So Beautiful,” though she wasn’t quite ready for the big time. “I was really shy,” she admits, “and I didn’t realize the unique sound of my voice until later on.” It wasn’t until a few years later when she moved to Los Angeles at 16 that DaniLeigh began harnessing her craft. In LA she found her footing in the music industry, starting with dancing. “I was dancing in music videos, commercials, you name it,” she recalls. “From there, I met a lot of producers onset and just networked.” Singing became the secret weapon, as DaniLeigh would reveal her chops and be invited to studios for recording sessions. However, a life-changing encounter with the legendary Prince would be the real catalyst.

After learning of DaniLeigh’s talents as a dancer (through a one-minute video clip), the Purple One reached out to have her direct his video for “Breakfast Can Wait” at just 18 years old. The video hit worldwide, appearing on networks like MTV, BET, and REVOLT. Prince ultimately took DaniLeigh under his wing, mentoring her budding singing career. His untimely death in 2016 left a void in DaniLeigh’s life, though his presence is still felt as DaniLeigh’s star is only getting brighter.

“Play” truly kicked things off. The high-energy single is described by DaniLeigh as an empowering anthem for women. “It’s a bold statement,” she says of the cut, which carries a message of “making a play” in all areas of life. “I’m a very positive person and this song I feel can help motivate people to put in that work,” she says. Bringing Kap G (who is of Mexican descent) into the fold as a feature was her way of uniting more Latinos in music, as DaniLeigh’s Dominican heritage is evident in both her style and sound. The single “Lurkin’” immediately followed, as a slick nod to social those stalkers who don’t congratulate moves, yet look on from the social media sidelines. The song even made its way to the HBO hit series Insecure. The stage is now set for DaniLeigh to show the diverse angles of her talent on a grander scale.

Aptly titled Summer With Friends, the upcoming EP sums up DaniLeigh’s past few months, which she lightheartedly describes as “just having fun and working.” The relatable nature of the project brings forth the aforementioned singles, along with feel good songs that channel the young artist’s inspirations including Aaliyah, Missy Elliott, and Drake while showing her ability to fuse hip-hop and R&B with poppier electronic-driven vibes. Songs like “Questions” playfully target those relationship interrogation sessions (Where were you? Who were you with?), while “Ex” is a self-explanatory track about the now-single artist’s previous romance. “He got one song,” she jokes. Other cuts like the infectious “On” and “All I Know” show DaniLeigh’s versatility within the pop-urban landscape, while “All Day” highlights her Dominican roots. “That’s a bachata beat underneath [the production],” she proudly points out. “The time right now is in alignment, showing that things are going the right way.” As DaniLeigh unveils her debut Summer With Friends and the projects that follow, she maintains her goal of positive music, though has one wish involving one important angel by her side. “I always say I wish Prince was here to see all of this happening with me right now,” she says. “It’s okay though. I know he’s watching.”

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

TEQUILA & TACO FEST × SD

TEQUILA & TACO FESTIVAL RETURNING TO DOWNTOWN SAN DIEGO ON APRIL 21 & 22

The second annual Tequila & Taco Music Festival to bring 2 days of the finest in tequila, tacos and entertainment to beautiful Downtown San Diego

This spring, San Diego’s Tequila & Taco Festival will be returning to the beautiful Embarcadero Marina Park South in Downtown San Diego on the weekend of April 21 and 22, 2018. The festival will feature exclusive tequila sampling exclusively on Saturday, with entertainment, good eats and other libations for guests 21 and up available throughout the weekend.

Performing will be multi-cultural supergroup Patron Latin Rhythms, a collaboration of well-seasoned professional musicians with an equally diverse catalog, ranging from Latin Jazz to old school R&B and back again. Also performing at the festival will be Cumbia and Spanish-language rock outfit Adelaide, whose electrifying performances have become Disneyland’s resident Latin dance and rock representatives, with others to be announced.

Confirmed brands participating in the festival’s Saturday-exclusive tequila tasting include: Hacienda Vieja; Real de Jalpa; Suerte Tequila; Pochteca; Ghost Tequila; Corazon Tequila; Stoller Imports; Tequila Gran Dovejo; La Luna Mezcal; Puente-Internacional; The Bloody Cure; Libre Spirits Company LLC; and Tequila Revolucion – with many more to be announced in the coming weeks. While there will be no tequila tasting for Sunday’s Mas Margaritas, a wide array of delicious margaritas and other beverages will be available for purchase.

Additionally, attendees can expect to enjoy delicious gourmet street tacos from a variety of food vendors, including: VIP Catering; Sandbar Grill; Wedos Tacos; Aqui Es Texcoco; San Diego Taco Company; Baja Style Fish Tacos; Chef TLC’s Sidewalk Café; Famoso Mexican Street Food and more.

About the Tequila & Taco Festival

The Tequila & Taco Festival will take place on Saturday, April 21, 2018 from 12:00 P.M. to 7:00 P.M. (Tequila sampling is 12:00 P.M. to 4:00 P.M.) and Sunday, April 22, 2018 from 12:00 P.M. to 6:30 P.M. Saturday tequila sampling tickets are $40. General admission tickets are $10 per individual Saturday and Sunday ticket. Premiere 2-Day passes are available for $60. Individuals must be 21 years of age or older with a valid ID to enter the festival and to consume alcohol. There is no tequila tasting on Sunday. Tickets will also be sold at the door while supplies last. For more information, please visit www.TequilaandTacoMusicFestival.com.

Ticket holders will have access to delicious gourmet street tacos, craft beers, margarita booths, art vendors and live music throughout the weekend. A portion of the proceeds from this event will benefit the Gen Giammanco Foundation, which provides financial support to deserving college bound student athletes in San Diego.