Posts tagged with "liquor"

Napa Valley’s First Wine History Museum and Tasting Salon

Jean-Charles Boisset Introduces Napa Valley’s First Wine History Museum and Tasting Salon: 1881 Napa  

1881 Napa Showcases Napa Valley Wines and History in Historic Victorian Home Adjacent to the Oakville Grocery

Napa Valley’s first wine history museum and tasting salon, is now open. Jean-Charles Boisset, proprietor of Boisset Collection, has created an homage to Napa Valley, with a tasting room that showcases wines from Napa Valley’s distinct sub-appellations, a museum where guests can explore Napa’s rich wine history, an extensive collection of historic wine relics from Europe and the United States and original artifacts from the Early California Wine Trade Archive. 1881 Napa is located in a historic Victorian home built in 1874 next to Oakville Grocery (founded in 1881) in Oakville, California, both of which were purchased by Boisset Collection at the beginning of the year.

“Napa Valley has a powerful place in American wine history and 1881 Napa puts the region in perspective on the world stage,” said Boisset, who grew up in Burgundy, France imbued with a passion for wine and learning as the son of vintners and the grandson of educators. “An extraordinary amount has been accomplished in this enclave in a short amount of time and we want to create a destination that celebrates Napa’s long history and its pioneering founders while exploring Napa’s incredibly diverseterroir in one destination.”

The gateway to Napa Valley, 1881 Napa is must-stop for wine enthusiasts, providing guests the opportunity to discover Napa Valley’s AVAs for the first time, or to explore some of their favorite appellations more deeply. Napa Valley was the first AVA designated in California in 1981 and within the region are 16 sub-AVAs that contain more geological diversity than any other wine region, leading to dramatically different wines within Napa Valley.

Located in a building more than 140 years old that was reimagined by renowned architect Howard Backen, 1881 Napa is next door to Oakville Grocery, the oldest continually operating grocery store in California. The two centerpieces of the space — a 48-light Baccarat crystal Zenith chandelier and a reproduction of an 1895 map of Napa County on canvas hanging from the ceiling — provide a dramatic environment to explore the varied wines of the valley, while displays highlighting the unique stories and soils of each appellation surround the tasting room.

The wine museum in 1881 Napa is open to the public with complimentary visitation. A self-guided tour up to and along the museum’s second-floor mezzanine tells the history of Napa Valley, introduces the founders and influential early pioneers  of the region and presents a robust collection of wine ephemera, including historic winemaking, vineyard, nursery and cooperage as well as displays curated and organized by the Early California Wine Trade Museum featuring local historic wine artifacts from the collections of Dean Walters and John O’Neill. From the mezzanine, guests have an open view to the tasting room below.

Alcoves hold soil samples from the various regions, along with 1881 Napa wines and descriptions of the appellations written by best-selling and award-winning author of The Wine Bible and wine expert Karen MacNeil. MacNeil also helped develop the various tasting options, which include comparative flights such as “Majestic Mountains Versus Plush Valley” and “Is it Cool to be Hot or Hot to be Cool?” as well as an option to “Embark on a Journey Throughout the Valley” by tasting Cabernet Sauvignons from 12 different sub-AVAs. In addition to the site-specific Cabs, guests can enjoy wines from a blend of Napa Valley grapes, including a sparkling wine, Sauvignon Blanc, rosé, Chardonnay, red blend, Merlot and a Cabernet Sauvignon — all wines crafted exclusively for 1881 Napa by Winemaker Thane Knutson to reflect the diversity of Napa Valley. After sampling the broad range of Napa Valley styles, guests can discover which AVAs they like the most and purchase wines from 1881 Napa as well Oakville Grocery.

1881 Napa is located at 7856 St. Helena Highway in Oakville and is open daily from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Reservations are recommended and can be made here.

About Boisset Collection
Boisset is a family-owned collection of historic and unique wineries and lifestyle destinations led by Jean-Charles Boisset and bound together by a common vision: authentic, terroir-driven wines in harmony with their history, their future and the land and people essential to their existence. With more than 25 historical and prestigious still and sparkling wineries in the world’s preeminent terroirs, including Burgundy, Beaujolais, Jura, the Rhône Valley, the south of France and California’s Russian River Valley and the Napa Valley. Its California wineries include DeLoach Vineyards, Raymond Vineyards, Buena Vista Winery and JCB by Jean-Charles Boisset; its French properties feature Domaine de la Vougeraie, Jean-Claude Boisset, Bouchard Aîné et Fils, J. Moreau et Fils, Louis Bouillot, Domaines Henri Maire, Fortant and Bonpas. Each house retains its unique history, identity and style, and all are united in the pursuit of fine wines expressive of their terroir. Wine is at the center of Boisset’s mission, and is complemented by spirits, beer, cider, gourmet foods and luxury goods, both of its own design and from partnerships with historic companies such as Baccarat, Lalique, St. Louis, Riedel, Christofle, and Bernardaud. To learn more about the Boisset Collection, please visit www.boissetcollection.com.

Featured image credit: Alexander Rubin

The Taste Returns

Los Angeles Times’ annual celebration of the Southern California culinary scene returns with events in L.A. and Costa Mesa. The pop-up block parties will take place at the Paramount Pictures Studios backlot over Labor Day weekend (Friday, Aug. 30 through Sunday, Sept. 1) and The MET over two days in October (Friday, Oct. 18 and Saturday, Oct. 19).

Hosted by The Times’ Food staff, each edition of The Taste will include three individual events. Unlimited tastings from the region’s best restaurants, a variety of wine, beer and seasonal cocktails, plus access to cooking demonstrations and talks by renowned chefs are included with admission. Tickets, ranging from $80 to $115, are on sale now at latimes.com/TheTaste. Early birds can take advantage of $20 off the ticket price with offer code SAVE20.

Photo credit: Courtesy of LA Times The Taste

Alcohol Brands from India That You Need to Try!

Are you someone who loves to experiment with taste, especially the taste of alcoholic beverages? If yes, we bet that after reading this article you will have a new list of alcohol brands from India to try next time.

Not many of you may know, but when it comes to alcohol brands, India is home to some of the top-selling brands across the world. Indian market in itself is one of the largest liquor markets in the world with plenty of brands coming up to meet the demands. Some of them have even gathered a significant fan base even in international regions.

Here are some of those top alcohol brands in India you should pick up for your next party. Take a look!

• Amrut Single Malt
If you haven’t tasted the single malt whiskey of Amrut, you are missing on something great. Best known for its amazing quality, Amrut Fusion Single Malt gives delicious notes of fresh fruit followed by a smoky finish. Prepared with a mix of unpeated Indian barley and peated Scottish barley, this single malt whiskey is aged in oak barrels. Interestingly, this brand was also listed as the world’s third finest whiskey by Jim Murray. All the more reason to try it soon, isn’t it?

• Rockdove
Though a new entrant but definitely a strong one on the list, Rockdove is a premium whiskey brand that offers exquisite flavours which are well suited for the sophisticated new generation. Manufactured by Hermes Distillery, Rockdove has started garnering a number of lovers in quite a short span of time. Be it its colour, aroma, fine aftertaste, everything about Rockdove will make you take another glass of this flagship whiskey and enjoy the evening a little more.

• Paul John Single Malt
Another award-winning whiskey brand, this Indian single malt by John Distilleries was launched in 2012 and has remained one of the popular alcohol brands in India. This single malt whiskey is prepared with 6-Row Barley which is specially grown in the foothills of Himalayas and matured enough to get the best taste. It comes in 7 variants include Brilliance, Edited, Bold, Classic Select Cask, Peated Select Cask, Kanya, Oloroso and Single Casks to suit your different tastes.

• DesmondJi
Made from blue-green agave sourced from the Deccan Plateau, DesmondJi is a homegrown liquor brand which would have been labelled as tequila if it were not for the geographical indication system associated with it. The brand offers five agave-based spirits, namely, Agave (100%), Agave (51%), Agave Gold with an oak finish, Margarita and Blue Margarita blend. If you are interested in tasting something authentic and Indian, DesmondJi is just for you.

• Solan No. 1
Brewed in the foothills of Himalaya by Mohan Meakin Limited, Solan No. 1 has been in the market for a long time. The whiskey was even listed among the best whiskeys across the world by Serge Valentin. Blended with mature Malt spirits, Solan No. 1 is aged in oak barrels and has a strong visual appeal and gives a delicious aroma of sweet malt and butterscotch. Not just this, the taste of this whiskey is quite different, smooth and pleasant which will easily make you its fan after just one drink.
Read it all? Well, then don’t forget to try them all when you party next time. And we bet that once you have relished the taste of these top alcohol brands in India, you will not want to go back to your old collection.

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

BLAKE ANDERSON GIFTS GSW

As the Golden State Warriors continue their celebrations as Kings of the city, Warriors super fan and actor/comedian Blake Anderson, gifted bottles of Crown Royal XR to the entire 2018 championship team. The bottles of $130 whisky come enclosed in a velvet, blue bag that were embroidered to reflect the team’s achievement.

The team received the bottles from Anderson this week, and he had the following to say about their accomplishment:

 

“Congratulations on a season fit for a king. As a California native and a Golden State Warriors super fan, I’m stoked to gift every member of the organization with a bottle of Crown Royal XR to celebrate your back-to-back championships like royalty. Cheers, champs!”

Crown Royal Releases New 13-Year-Old Blenders’ Mash

Crown Royal just released the third expression in its Noble Collection, Crown Royal 13-Year-Old Blenders’ Mash, a rare stock of the Canadian whisky made with a corn-forward mash bill. Carefully aged in new, charred American oak barrels for no less than 13 years, this is the first age statement offered from the Canadian whisky brand, the world’s bestselling Canadian Whisky. The complexity of the liquid intensifies with the aging process, bringing out richer and deeper notes of caramel and fruit.

Crown Royal 13-Year-Old Blenders’ Mash was named Best Canadian Whisky and received a Double Gold Medal at the 2018 San Francisco World Spirits Competition.

Browse or purchase at Crown Royal Blenders’ Mash

Cocktails Around the World

There are many different alcoholic drinks that you can enjoy these days, from premium beers and ales to fine wines, spirits, and liqueurs. Another thing that you can indulge in is one of the wide variety of delicious cocktails, which can be easily created at home. The choice of cocktails that you can rustle up these days is immense with something to suit all tastes and preferences.

In fact, you can enjoy sampling cocktails from around the world with some simple cocktail recipes. Lots of countries have their own signature cocktails so you can travel the world from the comfort of your own home by creating some of the cocktails from around the globe. You could even make an event of it with friends and family by also creating dishes from the same destination and getting a theme going.

Some of the great cocktails you can enjoy using signature drinks from around the globe

Many countries have their own signature drinks, and with these you can create a host of sumptuous cocktails that are perfect for any occasion. For instance, let’s take Russia as an example. Russian vodka is the perfect addition for many wonderful cocktails including Bloody Mary, vodka martini, and the White Russian. This is a very versatile drink that can actually form the alcoholic basis for many wonderful cocktails making it perfect if you enjoy a refreshing alcoholic beverage.

If you want something with plenty of kick and bite to it, Tequila is an excellent choice as the basis for your cocktails. Originating from Mexico, this super strong drink can be used in a variety of popular cocktails including the popular margarita, the Tequila Slammer and the Matador amongst others. You can also create the national drink of Mexico with tequila – the Paloma, which tequila combined with grapefruit soda and garnished with lime.

For those looking for a more refined and elegant cocktail, we turn to France which is where champagne originates from. While champagne is great to drink on its own, it can also create some wonderful cocktails such as mimosas and the delicious Kir Royale, which is made from a combination of champagne and cassis. This is a great way to add sparkle to your cocktails and add a touch a luxury to any event.

If you prefer something that is warming and distinctive, you can create cocktails from Scotch whisky, which hails from Scotland. This whisky is aged in oak barrels for several years to create that distinctive flavor and taste. There are many cocktails you can create that will make you fall in love with this beverage including the Rob Roy, the Rusty Nail, and the Godfather.

This is just a sample of the many drinks from around the world that can help you to create sumptuous cocktails for you and your friends to enjoy. All you need to do is look up some recipes, invest in a cocktail shaker or blender, and then get ready for a great night of cocktail sampling.

Hennessy × Miguel Cotto

The Six-Time Champion and Future Hall of Fame Boxer Recognized for His Success in the Ring and Philanthropy Outside the Ring

Hennessy, the world’s best-selling Cognac, honored six-time championship boxer and philanthropist Miguel Cotto, as the recipient of the 14th annual V.S.O.P Privilège Award. The Privilège Award recognizes Cotto’s mastery in the boxing ring, which has spanned more than 15 years – as well as his contributions and dedication to empowering the Latino community and his home of Puerto Rico.

Now in its 14th year, the Hennessy V.S.O.P Privilège Award is bestowed to individuals who are not only masters at their craft, but have achieved unparalleled levels of accomplishment and use that success to inspire and give back to their community through leadership, service and mentorship.

Cotto, who recently retired after one of the most storied careers in modern boxing, began his professional fighting in 2001 and has since risen above every obstacle, injury and adversary to leave an indelible mark on the sport – with a 41-6-0 record and winning championship belts in four weight classes. In addition to his showmanship in the ring – Cotto has shown just as much passion outside of the ring, empowering Latinos through his Fundacion El Angel de Miguel Cotto charity – where most recently he’s spent his efforts in helping the Hurricane Maria recovery across the island of his home of Puerto Rico.

“It is a true honor to be presented with the Hennessy V.S.O.P Privilège Award,” said Cotto. “Like Hennessy, I am dedicated to empowering future generations, and being recognized for these efforts is both humbling and inspiring.”

During the evening, Hennessy also announced its donation, on behalf of Miguel Cotto, to the Hispanic Federation to help support his continued efforts to rebuild and bring relief to Puerto Rico, and to the Fundacion El Angel de Miguel Cotto to support the boxer’s ongoing community efforts.

About Hennessy

In 2018, the Maison Hennessy celebrates over two and half centuries of an exceptional adventure that has linked two families, the Hennessys and the Fillioux, for eight generations and spanned five continents. It began in the French region of Cognac, the seat from which the Maison has constantly passed down the best the land has to give, from one generation to the next. In particular, such longevity is thanks to those people, past and present, who have ensured Hennessy’s success both locally and around the world. Hennessy’s success and longevity are also the result of the values the Maison has upheld since its creation: unique savoir-faire, a constant quest for innovation, and an unwavering commitment to Creation, Excellence, Legacy, and Sustainable Development. Today, these qualities are the hallmark of a House – a crown jewel in the LVMH Group – that crafts iconic and prestigious Cognacs.

Hennessy is imported and distributed in the U.S. by Moët Hennessy USA. Hennessy distills, ages and blends spanning a full range: Hennessy V.S, Hennessy Black, V.S.O.P Privilège, X.O, Paradis, Paradis Impérial and Richard Hennessy. For more information and where to purchase/ engrave, please visit Hennessy.com.

SOURCE Hennessy

Harikara Sake

Harikara Sake Brings You A Holiday Buzz

Winter Rose

-2 oz Haikara Yuzu or Haikara Momo

-½ oz rum

-1 oz Lime Juice

-Dash of Simple Syrup

-Dash of Rose Water

-Dash of Lavender Bitters

-Ginger Ale for topping

-Cranberries or orange peel (for garnish)

Directions:

-Add all ingredients, except ginger ale, to a cocktail shaker, add ice and shake vigorously until the outside of the shaker is frosted and beaded with sweat.

-Strain into rocks glass. Top with Ginger Ale and garnish.

Created by: Nick Mautone

ABOUT HAIKARA SAKE

Haikara Sake seamlessly brings together Japanese culture with America’s love for it. For the sushi, ramen, and yakitori lover on your list, Haikara will be an appreciated gift! Recently launched this fall, Haikara Yuzu is a Japanese citrus sake with a hint of lemon, while Haikara Momo is a Japanese peach sake. Haikara was created with endless mixing capabilities in mind. Crafted to be enjoyed chilled, over ice, or used to compliment cocktails, Haikara was created to give Americans a new way to appreciate sake.