Posts tagged with "Krishan Narsinghani"

Nic's on Beverly, 360 MAGAZINE, vaughn lowery, vegan

Nic’s On Beverly

By Krishan Narsinghani

(photos: Vaughn Lowery × copy edit: Paige Gilmar)

360 Magazine had the opportunity to try L.A.’s hottest vegan restaurant, Nic’s on Beverly. Nic’s is a fairly new eatery pioneered by Stephan Bombet and Nic Adler, the man who first opened Monty’s Good Burger and featured his arsenal at Coachella Music and Arts festival in Palm Springs.

Upon entering the establishment, a modern indoor dining area accented with a bar in blues and a patio can be found. The Hollywood heat is cooled by a gaping tree, sprinkled with lights, that shades most of the courtyard. With the smiles of the staff urging its patrons on, picking a seat has never felt more welcoming.

Start your afternoon right with handcrafted cocktails, a signature frozé or a Bloody Mary (for you spice lovers). Vegan waffles, tofu eggs benedict, and falafel burgers are just the start of Nic’s madness. The falafel burger particularly has meat-eaters covered and gets health nuts just a little more nutty. What means the most is the craftsmanship of each dish whether it be the four-step process fries or an in-house jelly. Farm-to-fork is deemed an understatement and perhaps the most overlooked dish would be the summertime peach salad which leaves your pallet refreshed with aromatic tomatoes.

At the end of the day, a foodie trying this establishment won’t care whether they are eating meat or not – the flavor says it all. The fresh gem can be found at 8265 Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90048, and their Instagram here.

Nic's on Beverly, 360 MAGAZINE, vaughn lowery, vegan

Nic's on Beverly, 360 MAGAZINE, vaughn lowery, vegan

Nic's on Beverly, 360 MAGAZINE, vaughn lowery, vegan, pet-friendly

Nic's on Beverly, 360 MAGAZINE, vaughn lowery, vegan

Nic's on Beverly, 360 MAGAZINE, vaughn lowery, vegan

Nic's on Beverly, 360 MAGAZINE, vaughn lowery, vegan

Nic's on Beverly, 360 MAGAZINE, vaughn lowery, vegan

Nic's on Beverly, 360 MAGAZINE, vaughn lowery, vegan

2019 EAT DRINK VEGAN

Written by Krishan Narsinghani × Vaughn Lowery

360 Magazine had the opportunity to cover the 2019 Eat Drink Vegan Fest in Pasadena, CA. With ample amounts of curated vendors, it was a food and drink galore that left guests feeling energized and healthy. Thirst on a ‘Saturday Funday’ was overkill.

Foodies (rather drink connoisseurs) could sample over 250 beverages including kombucha (alcoholic and non-alcoholic), smoothies, beers, wines, blended spicy margaritas, and organic spirits. Talk about quenching your pallet.

Delectable bites from buffalo chicken sandwiches made from soy beans, kimchi fries and chocolate cakes stole the show. Kids enjoyed a playground area while families sprawled across the lush yards within the Rose Bowl Stadium.

For real, an experience that conformed meat-lover tastebuds to a plant-based wonderland.

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

Margot

By Vaughn Lowery × Krishan Narsinghani × Michael Moadeb × Anthony Sovinsky

Restaurateur Rohan Talwar helms IB Hospitality and owns the illustrious West Hollywood gem, Norahs. A few months ago, he opened the doors to modish and culinary oasis, Margot – complete with exotic dishes, regional wines and special drink menu.

Margot, a Mediterranean infused restaurant composed of various seating and dine-in areas with 360 degree views of West LA, in Culver City is a diamond in the rough. The rooftop (indoor and outdoor seated venue) nests at the top of the PLATFORM (a boutique shopping experience with fashion/pop-ups, wellness and bites) and borders tons of retail, commercial and a new hotel soon erupting. The speedy Expo line train can be seen swiftly running east to west while you sip and/or dine outside and mimics the likes of some of the more prestigious eateries within Brooklyn’s Dumbo area. Similar to the train, rumors have quickly traveled throughout the city that Amazon will begin developing a new location nearby.

‘Hot like fire’ understates the atmosphere at night as the outside appears to be torched with tons of heat lamps in tow. With fresh farm-to-fork ingredients and handmade pastas (try the spaghetti), this place is a soon to be staple within the LA area. The menu constantly changes for an all-inclusive dining experience, including those with strict plant-based diets. Great for romantic dates, celebratory moments and family gatherings on ‘Sunday Funday’ largely due to their tapas as well as fresh raw seafood bar. Talk about delectable oysters. Step foot inside to find every inch of this establishment scream social media engagement wall. Note murals and tapestries all aligned in tune with a modernistic and contemporary ambiance. Service is extremely courteous, helpful and hospitable. And if that’s not enough to keep you coming back, the handcrafted cocktails will. Try their refreshening grapefruit gin and juice or a fruity frosé – worth every penny. It’s about time Culver City got what it deserved – a casual dining experience with budding professionals who seek something edgy, youthful and tasty.

Boost your metabolism before you eat, as SoulCycle is located on the second floor right underneath Margot. Or, after a zesty salad and sandwich at Margot, you may want to head down to the first level to the cozy ice cream shop with a menu of small-batch flavors, Van Leeuwen Ice Cream.

*Margot is open daily from 11am-2am.

Highlights
• Accommodates approximately 150 seated or 350 for reception
• Rooftop patio with dedicated bar accommodates approximately 120 seated or 150 for reception
• Intimate private dining terrace available for approximately 25 seated or 40 for reception
• Social dining options available for weekend brunches, lunch and dinner
• Market driven menu inspired by coastal mediterranean cuisine
• Full service bar with handcrafted cocktails made with fresh ingredients
• Stunning beach and city views throughout

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

360 MAGAZINE, Margot Restaurant, LA, Los Angeles, Vaughn Lowery

Austin Eldred

With over 230,000 Spotify streams on his single, ‘Are You Down,’ the people of Los Angeles keep buzzing around a fresh urban vibe named Austin Eldred.

The Orange County native is a show-stopping recording artist paving a name in the music world. Eldred has officially been releasing music for two years with hits featuring the noteworthy likes of Eric Bellinger and Problem. Eldred draws inspiration from his eclectic childhood upbringing in Southern California where he infuses R&B and Hip-Hop into a unique sound. His upcoming debut album, “1997” (executively produced by Ned Cameron) is soon to release and will showcase new sides of the performer. With ten new hand-written tracks, Eldred looks to put a permanent imprint on the industry.

Michael Evans Behling

By Krishan Narsinghani

As of late, 360 Magazine sat down with actor, Michael Evans Behling, to discuss his story on becoming a series regular on the hit CW tv-show “All American.”

Behling was born in Columbus, OH but raised in Columbus, IN. Growing up, he played football, volleyball and ran track & field. Before pursuing college for track, Behling’s mother pushed him to try his hand at modeling. Flash forward one year, the biracial newcomer shot for notable brands like Nike, Finish Line and White Castle. Discovering a passion for comedic shorts via social media, Behling paved a career path that created an escape from negativity and depression. His personal life in a funk, acting molded that release and in return, made himself and others feel better. A bold move to LA quickly proceeded and transformed his life.

What do you think been your favorite part of shooting All American?

An outstanding cast. People-wise, we are a family that clicked from the beginning. There’s such a nice atmosphere including the production! Whether in the morning or night, I’m smiling going in.

Being relatively new to working the industry, what is one thing you would work on more?

To continue working even more and getting out on stage. Whether it means taking more classes and working as much I can to get even more comfortable doing my job.

One thing you’d work on less:

Before going into work. Whenever you get to set, you make something fun. The challenging part is when you get home at 3AM after a sixteen hour day and you have to prep for the next day. During the past 8 months, I didn’t sleep but it’s worth it. Being on stage, I’m still new and have a lot to learn. There are still moments where I felt like I could have done something better but it’s this feeling of “unsure” where I hesitate.

Describe your role and thoughts on your character Jordan:

Jordan is a cocky, confused, angsty high schooler who is the Beverly Hills High School quarterback. He’s dealing with some major identity issues, especially when Spencer comes to town and sees how his father and him connect – I think he’s got a really good heart and a lot of love for his sister and mom, but wants to connect with his Dad and fill his shoes. He’s slightly a jock with underlying actions and a lot of pain I have to hit while on set. Jordan’s a mixed kid who’s struggling to find himself but vicariously living through his dad. We’re both mixed so there’s a strong connection.

What advice to you have for minorities and kids of color breaking into the industry?

Right now we have an advantage – use this time now to get your training, get headshots and get whatever you need to get into the room. What’s the number one thing you could do before you get in? Ask yourself why you want to be in the industry. Do you know why you want to get into the industry for the right reasons? It’s because you want to make a change and love the craft. You love entertainment and make a positive change in somebody’s life.

One you get into the room, and you perform it’s out of your control. The door is going to open at some point. Stay positive and don’t get discouraged.

BFUNK

BFUNK DANCE

Chaya Kumar and Shivani Bhagwan, the creators and founders of BhangraFunk and BollyFunk, have quickly become a worldwide phenomenon, known as BFUNK. Their viral YouTube dance videos featuring students from their sold-out classes in Los Angeles have caught the attention of many. They have collaborated with the King of Bollywood, Shah Rukh Khan and received co-signs from other Bollywood superstars like Diljit Dosanjh, Arjun Kapoor and esteemed choreographers Geeta Kapoor and Tricia Miranda. With over 200 million cumulative views on their dance videos, Shivani and Chaya have built an enormous fan base around the world. (#FUNKFAM) This has allowed them to travel and teach workshops internationally and bring a new style of dance to many renowned dance studios. They are pushing boundaries with their messaging and proving that dance can be a career.

360 had the opportunity in joining #BFUNK for a special dance class focused on crafting background dancers and the proper techniques during an on-stage live performance. The crossover between Bollywood and Hip-Hop formed powerful combos and an overall fluid routine that both choreographers taught. The whole experience felt like joining a family dance camp. Kumar and Bhagwan made it comfortable to ask questions, repeat steps and took the time to identify common mistakes. Hearing how proud they were of the class and watching them interact with familiar and unfamiliar faces showcased their passion for others to succeed. Classes are perfect for dancers of any experience and background, with this class emphasized on dancers breaking into the industry. Surprise guest and recording artist, Raja Kumari (whose song the routine covered), was invited as an example of how one should perform alongside a known performer.

“As South Asians, there exists no system of representation for an industry dancer to be booked on a professional job within their niche. In this class, we provided our students the opportunity to back up an artist, as it would be on stage.  It is our hope that this venture will create a clatter and foreshadow new beginnings for South Asian dancers.”

Kumar and Bhagwan will continue to foster a positive environment in their classes and relentlessly strive to change the conversation, eliminating labels and discussing dance as simply, dance. At age 26, their careers only continue to skyrocket into new heights.

RAJA KUMARI

Indian-American rapper, singer, songwriter and dancer Raja Kumari is a force of nature. She’s a fearless, charismatic personality and natural-born storyteller whose mission is to create art that blends her Indian roots with her American upbringing. Her music is a sonic bridge between East and West that fuses the rhythms she absorbed as a trained classical Indian dancer with her love for hip-hop. Through singles “Mute,” “City Slums” (featuring Mumbai rapper Divine), “Believe In You,” and her latest “I Did It,”as well as her debut EP, The Come Up (the cover features an image of Kumari with her head draped in both a gold tikka and an American flag), Kumari announces that this is the new face of America. “I want my fans to feel one hundred percent seen and to have a safe space to be themselves,” she says. “Because those were the onlydesires I had as a child.”

Born Svetha Rao in Claremont, Calif., to Indian parents who emigrated to the U.S. in the ’70s, Kumari was 13 when she had a vision that she calls “a memory of the future.” “I was in my room and I had this image of me standing on a stage,” she recalls. “I couldn’t see myself. I was looking out from my own eyes at a sea of 100,000 people and I could feel their energy. Suddenly I snapped out of it and said out loud, ‘How do I get there?’ My entire career has been about trying to answer that question, ‘How do I become that woman and how do I touch people?’ That became my life’s purpose.” Her answer is music and dance. “I feel like I’m a seed from the motherland that was sent across the world,” she says. “Culture is part of my identity because we, as Indian-Americans who grew up away from India, have to be the vessels of culture. We have to hold on because it’ll be lost within one generation. That’s why it so heavily influences my music and look. It’s not a gimmick to me. It’s an expression of a lifetime of trying to preserve it.”

Kumari set upon her artistic journey at age five when she began learning classical Indian dance, spending seven hours a day practicing with a dance guru who lived with her family for 10 years. Kumari studied several styles and, at age seven, made her debut in front of an audience that included Indian music legend Ravi Shankar, who declared her a child prodigy. By the time she was ten, Kumari was touring the U.S. and India, performing for massive audiences and raising substantial sums of money for charity, including enough to build a meditation hall and a new wing for a hospital in India.

Kumari listened to nothing but classical Indian music until she was nine, but then her older brother gave her a copy of The Fugees’ The Score, and her love for hip-hop was born. “That was the genesis of me as an artist,” she says. “Indian music is based on the mathematics of rhythm, so very quickly, as a little Indian kid who was not using her brain to be scientist, I used it to decipher the mathematics of hip-hop and realized that the rhythms of rap felt similar to the jathis and taals of Carnatic music. Hip-hop felt like a bridge.” Kumari also noted the large platforms that her favorite pop acts, like Britney Spears and *NSYNC, had to reach fans. “I was like, ‘How do I get my dance on that type of stage?’ And I realized that the only people who have stages like that are pop stars.”

At 14, Kumari recorded her first song professionally, started a hip-hop duo with a friend, and adopted her stage name, which means “princess” in Sanskrit. “That’s when I personified this strong, female goddess character called ‘Raja Kumari,’ the daughter of the king, and the king was God. So in my mind, I was the daughter of God.” She began writing her own songs as an act of rebellion. “I felt that everybody was expecting me to continue dancing and,like every other good Indian girl, marry a doctor,” saysKumari, whose father is a radiation oncologist. “I felt this path being set up for me and music became my way of doing something that was just for me.”

Kumari developed her writing skills and spent every day instudio sessions and attending songwriting camps all over the world. As she tried to crack the music industry code, she realized that the artists she looked up to started out as songwriters. “They had to prove they could sell millions of records, so that became my focus, too,” she says. “I put my artist project aside for two years to concentrate on learning.” As she found herself in in rooms with such heavyweights as Timbaland, Polow Da Don, Tricky Stewart, J.R. Rotem, and, at one point, Dr. Dre, Kumari soaked up everything she could about writing and vocal production. Her first placement came in 2012 when a song she co-wrote called “Change Your Life” wound up on Iggy Azalea’s Grammy-nominated album The New Classic. “Suddenly, I had credibility,” Kumari says.

Kumari signed with Pulse Recordings and went on to co-write hit songs for Fall Out Boy (the 4x-Platinum “Centuries,” which earned her a 2015 BMI Pop Award), Fifth Harmony, Twin Shadow, Knife Party, Dirty South, Lindsey Stirling, and Gwen Stefani (Kumari co-wrote six tracks on Stefani’s most recent album, This Is What The Truth Feels Like). Ironically, it was seeing Iggy Azalea wearing a gold kiritam in her “Bounce” video that fueledKumari’s determination to introduce authentic Indian culture to the masses. “To see my culture being put on as a costume — it woke me up,” she says. “I realized that if I didn’t do it, no one will.” Along the way, Kumari earned a degree in comparative religious studies at the University of California, Riverside.

In 2015, Kumari signed to Epic Records and released her debut single “Mute,” which addressed the challenges she faced when people in the industry advised her to tone down her ethnicity. (In the song’s opening line, she declares: “I had to put ‘em on mute / Thought that the curry was soup / I had to feed these fools / Had to go home and regroup.”)Kumari felt she had hit a roadblock in America and decided to decamp to Mumbai, where she was based for two years.

“I got there and everybody understood me,” says Kumari, who is also signed to Sony Music India. “I didn’t have to explain my bindi. I didn’t have to explain anything, really. People were so open to everything I was doing as an artist.I just wanted to prove that my music is worthy and that there are people who want to hear it. The validation from my people made me no longer crave validation from anyone else. When I walk into a room and someone tells me something can’t happen, I don’t even listen, because I already know what’s possible.”

Kumari wrote her latest single, “I Did It,” about that feeling. “It’s about me taking a leap,” she says. “It’s about how I didn’t do it the way everyone wanted, but I did it with integrity and that can’t be taken away from me. No one can tell me it won’t work, because it is working. I feel that the music is unstoppable now and that’s such a crazy feeling, because even today, my dad will say, ‘You know, you can just go back to medical school.’ They are still waiting for me to take the emergency exit. But I don’t feel like I’m allowed to quit because there are too many people, little girls like me, who didn’t see themselves represented in culture, who need it. I didn’t have anybody like me. I feel like I’m becoming the person I needed when I was growing up.

Harlowe Bar

Harlowe Bar

By Krishan Narsinghani

360 Magazine had the opportunity to join Harlowe Bar for a night out. The speakeasy atmosphere of the venue sets a different mood that one may caption as “A bit of Old Hollywood in West Hollywood.” The look is inspired by social clubs from Hollywood’s 19th century Golden Era. In reality, it’s a rather new establishment that features signature hand-crafted cocktails with whimsical names like “Business Bitch” and “Lizard King.” Food items are also available as well as Happy Hour from 5:00pm to 7:00pm daily.

The nightlife showcases a mix of Top 40 trending music and tables for purchase that include a booth seating approximately six people. Whether you prefer a booth, drink at the bar or dance floor with live DJ, the hidden gem is a 360 favorite. By the end of the night, Harlowe Bar will leave you with a sense of rejuvenation for a well-deserved rendezvous. The hotspot is located at 7321 Santa Monica Blvd, West Hollywood, CA 90046.

Hours

Tues-Sat 5p–2a

Sun-Mon 5p–12a

Happy Hour Every Day 5p–7p

Wisconsin Osthoff Resort

Wisconsin

By Krishan Narsinghani

Wisconsin is known for their cheese and ice creams. A major food one may overlook is the Wisconsin cranberry. 360 Magazine had the opportunity to visit their tourism team for an exploration of lodging, dining, cranberry wonders and more.

The trip began at the Osthoff Resort at Elkhart Lake, a quaint fairytale land that makes a city kid feel free. The plot roots back to the age of the Potawatomi Native American Tribe, where the area still inhibits the same wholistic lifestyle. In 1885, the Osthoff Resort was built by Auto Osthoff and reimagined 100 years later to the four Diamond AAA rated majestic lodge guests see today. The 248 room boasts 1, 2, and 3-bedroom suites that fancy a kitchen (or kitchenette) and an individual private balcony. The grand hotel is the perfect family getaway, especially in the Summer. With a three-tear lake deck and Mirror Lake, there’s no disappointment when it comes to adult and kid-friendly activities.The deck includes a bar, live entertainment along with water sports open to guests and the public – aqua cycles, power boats, sailboats and pontoon cruises.

The resort offers a handful of different restaurants to try, Lola’s On The Lake being the choice for media on their first night. Lola’s infuses their dishes with fresh ingredients from the Osthoff Gardens that harvest over 11,000 pounds of produce including edible flowers available in 2019. It’s a farm to table atmosphere while the menu is consistently changes. 360’s personal favorite was the Rib Eye Steak Special with Potato Donuts. This mouth-watering meal introduced savory and sweet for new flavors that will wow your tastebuds.

360 Magazine enjoyed an afternoon cooking class inspired from their wellness menu that featured nutrient dense and natural sugar items. The foods prepared are purposely chosen so more guests with dietary restrictions can participate and indulge. Courses included a Lemon and Raspberry Chia Seed Pudding, Overnight Oats, Egg Shakshuka (Baked Eggs with Feta, Garden Tomato Sauce and Cilantro) and a Quinoa Salad with Halibut. The Shakshuka wafted aromatic Middle Eastern flavors that start your pallet off right and finishes with a taste of creamy tomato sauce and powerful spices.

Others enjoyed a natural spa and wellness treatment at Aspira, which translates to “infused with spirit.” Guests rejuvenate themselves through a variety of specials such as the meditation sanctuary that binds water from Elkhart Lake and hydrating cranberry facials.

In 1857, Wisconsin birthed Steven’s Point Brewery, the third-oldest independently owned and continuously operating brewhouse in the United States. The guided tour and tasting throughout the facility showcased new craft beers and history that withstood the Civil War, prohibition and The Great Depression. Their pilot brewing system has the capacity to make ten barrels of beer at one time essentially creating a microbrewery inside of a craft brewery. Enjoy a refreshing pineapple flavor, white chocolate stout or Octoberfest.

Ride along Cranberry Highway to Gottschalk Cranberry Marsh to witness a breathtaking sea of red fruits. Throughout the Fall season, visitors can drive around 50 miles of these beds from Wisconsin Rapids to Warrens. This antioxidant rich treat is grown on low running vines at bogs and later flooded with water. The berries float to the top and are harvested by picking machines. Local restaurants like Great Expectations (originally a fully women-owned business) incorporate these cranberries into nearly all their dishes. These partnerships make for signature items like their House-Made Ginger-Cranberry Moscow Mule and Unforgettable Grilled Cheese with Cran-Pepper Jam.

One of America’s favorite juices, Ocean Spray, is headquartered on a 70 acre manufacturing facility. Producing 3.6 millions gallons of concentrate a year, the company utilizes a complex system. Wisconsin will produce 5.9 million barrels of cranberries in 2018 making so called, “America’s Dairyland,” the nation’s No. 1 cranberry producer.

Overall, 360 left with a delightful taste and an aura revitalized. When visiting Wisconsin, come prepared with an empty stomach and an open mind for well-deserved Midwestern hospitality.

travelwisconsin.com

wiscran.org

360 MAGAZINE, Reebok, r58, complexcon

ComplexCon 2018

By Krishan Narsinghani

For the third annual year, ComplexCon takes over the greater LA area. Set in Long Beach, California, major brands and celebrities flooded their convention center to witness spectacular musical acts, speakers, brands and art. Over the two days, 360 Magazine visited various booths – Puma, Champion, Reebok, Pink Dolphin, 1800 Tequila, Cadillac and more. Reebok’s exclusive ComplexCon shoe, the R58 stunted vibrant colors and introduced all three logos shown for the first time.

Takashi Murakami, contemporary artist on the host committee, sprinkled his aesthetics across the summit (in addition to a collaboration with Drake’s OVO). 1800 Tequila partnered with artist Adam Lucas and streetwear designer Nicky Diamonds for custom-made vintage denim jackets which were raffled at this year’s program. Attendees waiting in line for the McDonald’s installation were treated with Mcnuggets and fries before choosing patches to press onto free backpacks and shirts.

Recording artist Tinashe was a 360 favorite. The urban singer performed hits “Company” and “2 On.” Other performances included Lil Baby, Nav and T-Pain while the crowd also bopped to headliners Rae Sremmurd and Future. Duo Sremmurd surprised fans with a special appearance from rapper Tyga.

ComplexCon(versations) topics revolved around today’s thought on politics, culture, fashion and music. Billboard producer of the decade, Pharrell Williams was a host due to his creative sense on the latest pop culture trends. Tommy Hilfiger spoke on his relationships with Hip-Hop and the connections between music and fashion. Jaden Smith and Yara Shahidi discussed growth out of chaos and how youth should address political issues. Rapper and icon, Nas, spoke on the behind-the-scenes of film, “Belly” and how it changed Hip-Hop and Hollywood.