Posts tagged with "kittens"

Common Misconceptions When it comes to ESAs

Emotional support animals are becoming more popular and accepted as the stigmas surrounding mental health go away, and people prioritize self-care. Millions of people have mental conditions that go untreated for various reasons, whether they can’t afford regular therapy or do not have health insurance. Having a pet is an easy way to improve mental health for anyone, but it’s extra important for those with certain psychological disorders. Emotional support animals are pets that help someone with specific mental conditions, and there are many misconceptions about ESAs. 

Emotional Support Animals are Service Animals

One of the biggest misconceptions when it comes to ESAs is confusing them for service animals. There are many differences between an emotional support animal and a service animal regarding their purpose and where they are allowed. An emotional support animal is a special type of companion animal for those with qualifying psychological conditions. They are different from service animals and therapy pets.

ESA Training

Emotional support animals help reduce stress and anxiety in their owners, through their calming presence. They do not need any formal training besides basic obedience to behave in public. Service animals, on the other hand, go through extensive training to perform specific tasks and functions for their disabled owners, who are typically physically disabled rather than mentally.  It’s much harder to get a service animal, as they must pass many certifications to qualify as a service animal. 

ESA Rights

Another common misconception about emotional support animals is that they’re allowed to accompany their owners into non-pet friendly places like restaurants and grocery stores. Emotional support animals can live in housing that does not permit pets and can fly with their owners in the cabin of an aircraft without a pet fee. They have no additional rights in public areas. Service animals are allowed to accompany their disabled owners in any space open to the general public, including restaurants, movie theatres, schools, and museums. 

Any Type of ESA can Fly with their Owner

While service animals can only be dogs and miniature horses, any animal can technically be an emotional support animal. Many therapists only recognize the therapeutic benefit of dogs and cats, however. For the safety and convenience of other passengers, many airlines are updating their policies to only allow cats and dogs as emotional support animals. Cats and dogs are more easily trainable. In the past, airlines permitted any type of ESA, but this is changing. 

Emotional support animals are an important mental health tool for those with common psychological conditions like anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. They help their owners cope with the symptoms of their disability, reducing stress and anxiety. Many people confuse emotional support animals with service animals, and there are many misconceptions about what an ESA is and where they are allowed to go with their owners. The two main rights emotional support animals have is housing and travel, where service animals are allowed to go nearly anywhere with their disabled owners and are highly trained to perform tasks. 

Traveling with a pet over the holidays?

Make sure you’re up-to-date on all the rules and regulations around travel with your pet! Just this year, Delta revoked a rule that animals could not accompany passengers on flights 8 hours or longer, with the exception of Pitbulls.

“Flying and traveling stirs immense anxiety in some people, and leaving home without their Emotional Support Animal or pet can be traumatizing. It’s great that Delta and other airlines continue to recognize the importance of allowing travel on their aircrafts.” – Prairie Conlon, LMHP and Clinical Director at CertaPet

While the debate wages on over whether Emotional Support Animal’s are considered legitimate, CertaPet emphasizes that their clients must complete a clinical evaluation, as well as a therapy session, before a licensed mental health professional determines whether they need an ESA letter. CertaPet therapists only write ESA letters for dogs, cats, and rabbits. And in fact, CertaPet sees a ~25% increase in the need for an Emotional Support Animal during the holidays. Most airlines charge a fee ($100+) for small, regular pets (non-ESA’s) to fly with you as a carry-on. ESA’s are protected by law and require no additional fee to travel as a carry-on.

25 Things to Know Before Bringing Your Dog on a Plane

Kate Walsh, Actress, 360 MAGAZINE, MyDogsAGame.com

Get your dog’s A-Game back

Is your dog’s scratching more than “just an itch?” Actress and life-long dog lover Kate Walsh knows first-hand that dogs can be “off their game” because of allergic itching, leading to more serious problems if not treated by a veterinarian. Kate joins us today to share important info on how you can get your dog’s A-Game back.

As a lifelong dog lover, how did you know that Rosie was off her game?


Kate Walsh: She started scratching her face in sort of a cute way at first with both paws at the same time. And then it turned into a regular thing where it wouldn’t stop, and I realized pretty quickly it was probably allergies. So I took her into my veterinarian, and she prescribed Apoquel for Rosie.

How should we know when and if it’s more than an itch, and when it’s time for our pets to visit their veterinarian?

Kate Walsh: If the itching and scratching starts interrupting their regular daily activities — if they’re on a walk and they have to stop several times to scratch and itch or chew, or if they wake up in the middle of the night to chew, those are signs that there’s a problem. A lot of dog owners think oh, that’s just my dog itching but it’s likely allergies. If you see these signs, it’s a good idea to visit your veterinarian and see if Apoquel might work for you. It certainly worked for Rosie.

How should people with pets avoid allergies for some of their animals?

Kate Walsh: It’s hard to avoid allergens because so many allergies are environmental and are out of our control – just like humans with pollens or grasses, or during certain times of the year. For some dogs it’s seasonal allergies, some are perpetual and year-round. There’s really no way to prevent them so it’s about going to the veterinarian and seeing what they have to say. It’s also important to understand that dog allergies manifest differently than human allergies do. In dogs, allergies show as skin itching, chewing and hotspots – not coughing and sneezing like humans.

And how did you help Rosie get her A game back?

Kate Walsh: Well, I got her on Apoquel right away. Within a couple of days she was back on her A-game, happy, smiling, walking, tail wagging, able to relax and not scratching her face constantly. One of my favorite parts about this partnership is how we’re encouraging everyone out there to go to MyDogsAGame.com or use the hashtag #MyDogsAGame on social media to share a picture of your dog. For every photo uploaded, Zoetis will donate $10 to the K-9 Courage Program, which is an awesome program that provides medical services to retired service dogs, military service dogs, police service dogs. So that’s a really exciting aspect of this partnership as well. We’re not just raising awareness about what dog allergies look like, but really contributing and making sure all dogs are well cared for.

And what inspired you to represent an organization to help Canine Courage?

Kate Walsh: I love dogs. I’ve always loved them. I’ve grown up with them–they’re just so special and intuitive. I’m also a big fan of our service men and women and everything that they do for our country – so the partnership was a perfect fit. Most people don’t think about how retired service dogs are cared for, and the fact that the K9 Courage program helps support the medical care for retired service dogs is really cool.

So you’ve always been an advocate for pets?

Kate Walsh: Oh yeah. I have always been a big pet adoption advocate and an animal lover. I mean if I could, I’d be on a farm somewhere with lots of cats and dogs.

And where can our listeners go for more information?

Kate Walsh: You can go to MyDogsAGame.com If you have any questions, there’s actually a short quiz on there as well to help you determine if your dogs may have allergies, as well as more information about finding the right treatment like Apoquel.

About Kate Walsh

Actress, dog lover and animal rights activist Kate Walsh can be seen on recent and upcoming projects, including Netflix series, THE UMBRELLA ACADEMY, and films, SELL BY and 3022.

Walsh has starred in award-winning series, including the ABC dramas GREY’S ANATOMY and PRIVATE PRACTICE, as well as the Netflix features 13 REASONS WHY. She was seen in Universal’s hit comedy, GIRL’S TRIP, alongside Jada Pinkett Smith, Queen Latifah, and Regina Hall, the Netflix feature, #REALITYHIGH and Sony’s MARK FELT: THE MAN WHO BROUGHT DOWN THE WHITE HOUSE. She also recently starred in the off-Broadway play IF I FORGET, for which she was nominated for a Drama Desk Award and Drama League award.

Today, Walsh has teamed up with leading animal health company, Zoetis, to educate dog owners about a cause close to her heart – allergic dog itch. Walsh has credited her two rescue dogs for helping her through the most difficult times, but when her dog Rosie was diagnosed with allergic itch, it was time for Walsh to help Rosie get her A-Game back. Like Rosie, some dogs are “off their game” because their allergic itch gets in the way of doing things they love. Kate is encouraging dog owners to recognize when their dog’s scratching can be more than just an itch – and if it’s caused by an underlying condition, like allergies. As part of the program and in honor of Itchy Pet Awareness Month, pet owners can share a photo of their own pet’s “A-Game” on social media using the #MyDogsAGame hashtag, which will trigger a $10 donation (capped at $25K) by Zoetis Petcare to its K-9 Courage Program, which provides healthcare assistance to retired military and police dogs as well as active service dogs that assist veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress. Posts using the hashtag may also be featured on an interactive gallery on the “MyDogsAGame.com” website.

Fetch cbd, cats, dogs, cbd, cannabis, medicine, 360 magazine, puppies, kittens

Fetch: CBD For Pets

Numerous international studies suggest that CBD may be beneficial for pets with issues such as anxiety, inflammation, seizures generalized pain, nausea and inappetence. New Fetch tinctures which some in two bottle sizes depending on the size of your pet) contain full-spectrum CBD obtained through CO2 extraction from American-grown industrial hemp. There is no THC (the chemical in marijuana that produces a “high” sensation) and therefore no psychoactive effects. Safe and gentle for beloved pets, each Fetch formula is third party lab-tested for potency and residual solvents. All of the plant material used is tested for heavy metals, pesticides and herbicides.

The company was started by a Boulder, Colorado-based full-service hemp extraction lab (founded in 2016 by combat veteran, Craig Henderson) called Extract Labs. It’s a great product to use to chill out your pet if they have anxiety, have to travel or are in stressful situations. For older pets, it’s also fantastic for joint and muscle pain.