Posts tagged with "Jane Fonda"

Can plastic surgery make you look older?

According to expert Board-Certified Plastic surgeons, the goal of cosmetic surgery is to make a woman like look a refreshed, enhanced version of herself. While many seek cosmetic surgery to turn back the clock; (a respectable, personal choice) there is a downside. The eerie expressionless, puffy, distorted, look that makes people appear even older than they are. To help us understand and achieve a more maintained, elegant look, we tapped the expertise of Board-Certified Denver Plastic Surgeon Dr. Manish Shah.

Most Common Culprit… Too Much Filler

According to Dr. Shah, the best way to begin is to look at photos of the person decades younger to assess their aging progression and facial symmetry. “You want to look at the facial features to see where there is drooping or volume loss as not to run the risk of over filling the face. When too much filler is used, facial balance is thrown off.”

Dr. Shah explains that today we’re seeing young women in their 20’s trying to look like they’re photo filtered in real life. “They start Botox too young, or overfill their lips, breasts, and derrieres. The odd consequence is that that end up looking older. There are several celebrities who are under 25 and look 30, and 35 due to the work they’ve had done. The lips and cheeks are often the first facial features to be overdone in younger patients.”

Facial Breakdown

Cheeks: Dr. Shah says, that “Over-suctioning cheeks through liposuction can make you look older. Stiffness or “puffy cheeks” can also occur if there is unnecessary fat transfer or filler injections are overdone.”

Brows: A highly arched eye brow, or a brow without any arch can instantly age you. “Getting the eyebrow height perfect to achieve a natural look is one of the most challenging techniques plastic surgeons face with Botox, be sure to find someone who specializes in brow area Botox.”

Chin: “The overall balance of your face can be thrown off if a chin implant is too large,” says Dr. Shah. He adds, “Facial structure goes from more of a heart shape to a square shape. Also, the softness of your face gets lost.”

Neck: Removing too much fat from the neck can result in an excessive deep and sharp angle that gives more of a harsh look.

Midface: Some women get a facelift before it’s needed. Think of many of the stars of Bravo’s Real Housewive’s franchise. “When it’s unnecessary or not done properly, the underlying facial tissues give an unnatural fullness in the cheeks that makes the face look aged, explains Dr. Shah.”

Eyes: Fat removal under the eyes is popular in younger patients. The problem is that removing too much fat can really make a patient look hollower rather than refreshed.

Injectable Toxins: The Frozen Look

Botox, Dysport and Xeomin are all effective in reducing lines by temporarily paralyzing facial muscles to stop movement. Problems arise when they are overdone. The face can look very severe and certain facial features can become exaggerated. It is strange to see a woman over 50 with fewer forehead and brow mobility than a pre-teen!

Dr. Shah offers a tip and reminds us that injectable toxins are not permanent, and the result will fade away in time. “It’s best to let the product completely wear off before getting injectable toxins applied to the face again. It’s always best to start off with much less because you can always work your way up to more,” he advises.

Too Large Breast Implants:

Implants that do not fit a woman’s frame and are overexaggerated, are never a good idea at any age. The older a woman gets, the more this is going to scream, “look at me” and be incongruous with the rest of her appearance. Jane Fonda is a perfect example of a woman in her 80’s with implants that match her body in a flattering way.

Ignoring Your Hands and Décolleté:

So many women make the mistake of obsessing over their face, legs, derriere, breasts, and abdomen that they completely forget their hands and décolleté. The latter are a dead giveaway of age, no matter how young the rest of you looks.

Examples of Elegance:

According to Dr. Shah, here’s who he feels has “gotten it right” when it comes to aging gracefully whether they have had plastic surgery or not include, Jane Fonda, Jennifer Aniston, Jennifer Lopez, Halle Berry, Angela Bassett, Katie Couric, Raquel Welch, Kathie Lee Gifford, Kris Jenner, Naomi Campbell, Michelle Pfeiffer, Jayne Seymour, Ellen DeGeneres, Sharon Stone, and Padma Lakshmi. Use these celebs for inspiration when contemplating cosmetic enhancements.

Find out more at www.drmanishshah.com

About Dr. Manish Shah

Plastic Surgeon Colorado | Dr. Manish Shah, M.D. | Denver

Manish Shah, M.D., F.A.C.S. was born in Canada and raised in the Washington, D.C. area. He graduated with honors from the University of Pennsylvania, receiving a degree in biomedical engineering. He then completed his medical training at the University of Virginia, earning his Medical Doctorate. During this time he also completed a one-year fellowship in microsurgery research at the New York University School of Medicine / Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery. As a prelude to his plastic surgery training, Dr. Shah completed a rigorous five-year training program in General and Trauma Surgery at Emory University and the Medical College of Georgia. His formal training in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery was completed at the Univ. of Tennessee College of Medicine – Chattanooga Unit. After completing his plastic surgery training, he moved to New York City when he was selected for the prestigious Aesthetic Surgery Fellowship at Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital. He underwent extensive, advanced training in aesthetic surgery of the face, breasts, and body at the hands of some of the most renowned cosmetic surgeons in the world. This fellowship is widely considered to be the best of its kind in the world. Dr. Shah is one of only a select few plastic surgeons in the country who have undergone formal post-graduate training in aesthetic surgery.

Dr. Shah’s specialties include revision facial aesthetic surgery, rhinoplasty (“nose reshaping”), and aesthetic surgery of the breast (breast augmentation, breast lift, breast reduction). He is, however, well-trained in all areas of aesthetic surgery. Dr. Shah’s aim is to obtain a natural appearing transformation that complements the real you!

Dr. Shah is a past Clinical Assistant Professor of Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center based at Denver Health Medical Center, the Rocky Mountain region’s only academic Level I trauma center. He is a past Chief of Plastic Surgery at Denver Health Medical Center. He also maintains a private practice in Aesthetic and Reconstructive Plastic Surgery on the Dry Creek Medical Center campus (DTC/Denver) and up in the Aspen Valley (Basalt – in the office of MDAesthetics – Tim Kruse, M.D.).

Dr. Shah is a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery and the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. Dr. Shah is board-certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.

Becoming AFI × 50 Years

 “This book puts you directly behind the scenes for a story that began with a dream, overcame constant challenges, and evolved into the institution it is today.”Steven Spielberg

“Documented here by the people who lived it, this is a remarkable tale of how a major institution, created out of whole cloth, wove itself into the American fabric.”

Cokie Roberts, author and political commentator for ABC and NPR 

Becoming AFI Celebrates 50 Years of the American Film Institute


For over fifty years, the American Film Institute has flourished as one of America’s great cultural entities. Its graduates, faculty, supporters, and trustees have included such acclaimed individuals as Steven Spielberg, Maya Angelou, Gregory Peck, Sidney Poitier, Meryl Streep, Les Moonves, Patty Jenkins, David Lynch, Jane Fonda, Edward James Olmos, Shonda Rhimes, James L. Brooks, and many other respected leaders in the worlds of film, television, digital media, and philanthropy.

In their new book, Becoming AFI: 50 Years Inside the American Film Institute (Santa Monica Press/October 2017), Jean Picker Firstenberg and James Hindman provide a candid look at how this remarkable organization brought together aspiring filmmakers, educators, and artists who helped AFI become the foremost national champion for moving images as a vibrant art form.

From its early years operating out of the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC, and the legendary Greystone mansion in Beverly Hills under the leadership of George Stevens Jr., through its incredible growth into an influential cultural institution at its landmark Hollywood campus under the guidance of Jean Picker Firstenberg, to its continued excellence today under the dynamic leadership of Bob Gazzale, the organization and its history are chronicled in Becoming AFI through in-depth essays written by those who have been involved in its adventures, growth, and success.

 “After being asked so many times what our book would be about, we decided to put together AFI’s history as we experienced it personally,” explain Firstenberg and Hindman. “As we structured the book with the stories we wanted to tell from those years, we realized that some of those stories really belonged to other voices. So, we went to several former colleagues and asked them to join our band. Each chapter tells a stand-alone story about an aspect of AFI, but together, they add up to the full picture.”

Becoming AFI provides an insightful, behind-the-scenes look at how AFI, with passionate determination, overcame the hurdles of advancing technology, political shifts, and new audience dynamics to turn its aspirations into a substantial and highly successful organization, becoming a tireless advocate of moving images as one of America’s most popular forms of art, and maturing into one of the world’s most respected educational and cultural institutions. 

“No matter how divisive life in this country may become, the movie theater has always been a place where we can discover what unites us.”

Vernon Jordan Jr., New York Times  “AFI saved our film history. AFI celebrates filmmakers. AFI trains the next generation. Thanks to Becoming AFI for telling us the fascinating story of its fifty-year history. And a big thank you to Jean Picker Firstenberg and James Hindman for documenting all of it! Here’s to the next fifty!”

Edward James Olmos, actor and AFI trustee


About the Authors
Jean Picker Firstenberg served as president and CEO of the American Film Institute from 1980 to 2007, overseeing the development of AFI as one of America’s greatest national, cultural, and educational resources. She received an AFI Life Achievement Award for Service to the Institute and was named president emerita and a lifetime trustee. In 2016, Firstenberg was named to the California State University Board of Trustees by Governor Jerry Brown, overseeing the largest four-year public university system in the United States, with twenty-three campuses educating the most diverse student body in the nation. Prior to serving at AFI, Firstenberg spent four years as a program officer at the John and Mary R. Markle Foundation. She also served as director of Princeton University’s Publications Office. Firstenberg is a summa cum laude graduate of Boston University’s College of Communications. She has served on several boards, including that of Boston University (1984–1996), the George Foster Peabody Awards at Georgia University (1985–1997; board chair 1991–1997), and the United States Postal Service Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee (2002–2014; committee chair 2008–2014). She has won numerous awards and honorary degrees. 

James Hindman, PhD, has spent his career in cinema and performing arts, creating and leading professional and public education programs at major institutions. During his twenty-four years at the American Film Institute, where he served as co-director and chief operating officer, he was provost of the AFI Conservatory, which he nurtured through WASC accreditation. He was also the uncredited producer of the award-winning feature documentary Visions of Light and the television series Starring the Actor. He developed the AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center in Silver Springs, Maryland, as well as numerous television projects and international film and television festivals. Subsequent to AFI, he developed and led film schools in the U.S. and internationally, including the Red Sea School of Cinematic Arts in Aqaba, Jordan, and New Mexico State University’s Creative Media Institute in Las Cruces. He is currently on the board of the New Mexico School for the Arts in Santa Fe, charged with creating a new cinematic and media arts program and facilities for the school. Prior to AFI, he served as head of graduate studies in the Performing Arts Department at American University in Washington, DC, having previously taught at the University of North Carolina. Hindman holds a PhD in drama from the University of Georgia and has served on the boards of the AIDS Service Center and LAMP in Los Angeles. He currently splits his time between Santa Monica, California, and Taos, New Mexico.

Patty Jenkins made history in 2017 when she directed her second film, Wonder Woman, becoming the first woman to direct a studio superhero movie and earning the biggest domestic opening of all time for a woman director. Jenkins wrote and directed her first film, the crime drama Monster, in 2003, launching Charlize Theron’s career with many awards, including an Oscar for Best Actress. Jenkins graduated from the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in 1993 and the AFI Conservatory in 2001.

Dana Gioia was appointed Poet Laureate of the State of California in 2015 by Governor Jerry Brown. An award-winning poet who has published five collections of poetry, Gioia served as chair of the National Endowment for the Arts from 2003 to 2009, and was named a USC Judge Widney Professor in Poetry and Public Art in 2011.

David Lynch, born in 1946 in Missoula, Montana. Eagle Scout. 


BECOMING AFI: 50 YEARS INSIDE THE AMERICAN FILM INSTITUTE

By Jean Picker Firstenberg and James Hindman

Foreword by Dana Gioia

Preface by Patty Jenkins

Afterword by David Lynch

Santa Monica Press/October 2017

Hardcover/$27.95

ISBN-13: 978-159580-094-7


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