Posts tagged with "Iran"

Behind the lens of renowned Iranian cinematographers

Time Lapse is an exhibition of striking photographs by prestigious Iranian film directors. After enormous success in both London and Tehran, the exhibition will travel to the USA in November, to be shown at The Container Yard in Downtown Los Angeles.

Time Lapse features the work of Cannes Film Festival award-winning directors Jafar Panahi and Abbas Kiarostami, Cannes Film festival award nominee Nasser Taghvai, award-winning documentary maker Kamran Shirdel, San Sebastian International Film Festival award-winning director Majid Barzegar, World Press Photo award-winning Cinematographer Seifollah Samadian and celebrated actor and Cairo film festival award-winning director Hamid Jebeli. The exhibition celebrates Iranian cinema and its international reach, and simultaneously demonstrates the talent of the directors, stretching beyond dynamic filmmaking to the creation of fine art.

CAMA Gallery aims to provide a politically neutral platform on which to showcase the wealth of artistic talent in Iran. CAMA Gallery has three galleries in Iran, a gallery in London, and will soon open a permanent space in Los Angeles.

The exhibition opens with a private view on November 2 from 8pm and runs through November 14, 2018.

Treatment of Afghan Interpreters

Approximately one month, the Director of Faith Matters, Fiyaz Mughal, highlighted the plight of Afghan Interpreter, Mohammed Nabi, and how he was sleeping rough on the streets of Athens. Nabi’s case was initially documented and he was assisted by Jess Webster, who works with refugees in Greece.

Having heard of the case, the petition by the Director of Faith Matters, has now reached over 116,000 signatories within 5 weeks. It is now being backed by the Sun on Sunday and has also been highlighted by the Daily Mail and the Metro. Yet, the Government have made no headway in addressing this issue. There is therefore a groundswell of public opinion backing Nabi’s case, yet the politicians refuse to even acknowledge this case.

Mohammed Nabi worked for ISAF and British forces in Afghanistan between 2008-2011. He has received numerous commendations for his work with British Forces such as from the 1st Battalion of the Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment. He was instrumental in interpreting Taliban commands in real time when in the field with British soldiers and thereby he was key to tracking Taliban troop movements and attack points against British soldiers.

Speaking to Mughal in Athens he said that:
“My role was to work with commanding officers and I was the bridge between Afghan forces and British commanding officers. When officers from the British army went to speak to village elders, I was with them. There was an unwritten command that Taliban leaders gave to their forces to kill Afghan Interpreters first so that British and ISAF forces would be blind in the field. I was at risk of suicide bombers in such situations in villages as they tried to target British commanding officers and their interpreters”.

Nabi left working with the British armed forces after 1 year, (in 2009), because of threats from senior Afghan commanders made against his family and against him. He rejoined ISAF and British forces within 3 months of leaving since his skills were suited to armed forces work and he could not find other work and served again as an Afghan interpreter until 2011.

In 2016, an attempted kidnap against him failed and ‘night knocks’ against his front door raised threat levels against him and he fled on foot through Iran and into Turkey where he lounged for 18 months with no assistance from aid agencies who were assisting families. They were therefore not focused on assisting young single men.

Repeated attempts to highlight his case and the threat to his four children and wife failed in Turkey and he was left destitute and penniless, where he took up shepherding for basic subsistence. Each month though, saw the Taliban makes gains and come closer to his village and Nabi said that the policy of the Taliban to the children of people who assisted ISAF forces was to call them ‘sons of snakes, who were snakes themselves’. In other words, the children of Afghan interpreters were at serious of attack.

In 2016, to highlight his case he left Turkey and ended up being arrested in Greece and jailed. He was eventually released and claimed asylum though ended up penniless sleeping on a park bench in Athens where the Director of Faith Matters met up with him.

Speaking about the plight of Afghan Interpreters and in particular Nabi’s case, Fiyaz Mughal OBE, who developed the petition and who worked with the Sun on Sunday to highlight his case, said:

“Nabi has been denied entry into the UK and given no assistance when he approached UK Government agencies. How can this be right when he saw Afghan colleagues die in battle and Nabi was there saving British lives by interpreting Taliban commands whilst rounds went over his head. The only possessions he has are the plastic-coated commendations from officers because of his work in the field. It is disgusting the way that this man has been treated.

“The treatment of Afghan interpreters is a national disgrace and what the petition and the support from national newspapers shows is that the public care, whilst politicians have shown little courage in addressing this matter. I believe that anyone who has served more than a year in Afghanistan supporting our armed forces and who can show that their lives are in danger because of their work, must be let in. We relied on them to keep our armed forces safe, and now they need our help. This national disgrace must end and I will keep speaking out”.

ISCHIA FILM FESTIVAL 2018

The XVI edition of the Campania island festival opens with Gabriele Salvatores and his diptych of the invisible boy. But it will only be the beginning.

Oscar winner Gabriele Salvatores will open the XVI Ischia Film Festival. A great start for the event that sees a very rich program unravel from June 30th to July 7th. The Mediterranean director is the Italian author who has most explored the genres of cinematography, and will tell the audience of Ischia his constant desire to change. He will do this by presenting The Invisible Boy and The Invisible Boy – Second Generation, his diptych dedicated to the adventures of a young superhero.

Diversity, courage, even sound unconsciousness. These are some of the key words that characterize this Ischia Film Festival 2018, built magnificently by the artistic directors Michelangelo Messina and Boris Sollazzo and that will develop through the one hundred and thirteen selected films, including thirty-three previews, including eight world titles. Important numbers, as are the thirty countries that these works represent, from Burkina Faso to the Dominican Republic, passing through Iran, Turkey and Italy. Many of these works will compete for the prizes of the five official competitions: feature films, short films, documentaries, Location Negata and Scenari Campani, the latter promoted to a competitive section thanks to the support of BPER Banca. Others will be the Best Of this year and this edition, and will be accompanied by directors and actors who have made this year of Italian cinema very special. The list of guests who will parade on the red carpet of the Aragonese Castle is very long. Beyond Salvatores, Alessandro Aronadio and Edoardo Leo, director and interpreter of Io c’è, are expected for the opening night of 30 June. Leonardo Di Costanzo, who with his L’intrusa is a fresh winner of the Golden Globe. Anna Valle, who will accompany the imperfect age. And then Manetti Bros, Fabio De Luigi, Roberta Torre, Guglielmo Poggi, Renato Carpentieri, Fabrizio Gifuni, Claudia Gerini, Giulia Michelini, Vinicio Marchioni, Nicola Giuliano, Alessandro Rak, Federico Buffa, Sandra Milo, Carlo Delle Piane, Caterina Murino, Caterina Shulha, Lillo Petrollo, The Jackal, Laura Bispuri, Massimiliano Gallo, Nicola Nocella, Bruno Oliviero, Berardo Carboni, Matilda De Angelis, Concita De Gregorio, Antonello Piroso, Fabio De Caro, Gigione, Milena Mancini, Daniele Vicari, Nicola Guaglianone, Pippo Mezzapesa, Yvonne Sciò, Michela Andreozzi, Massimiliano Vado, Giancarlo Fontana, Giuseppe G. Stasi.
And then great authors who will receive the right tribute. Gabriele Muccino, Carlo Verdone, Peter Greenaway and, for his seventy years of career, Carlo Delle Piane, extraordinary actor in our history of cinema.

They will all meet at the Terrace which will host the aperitifs with the stars, before the evening’s program on the five screens of the festival. Programming enriched with two great Italian premieres. On July 1st I, God and Bin Laden, crazy comedy with Nicolas Cage directed by Larry Charles, the man behind Borat (in Italian cinemas from July 27th distributed by Koch Media). July 4th will be the turn of Gringo, who will arrive in Italy with the title Cannabis: budding scammers (Vision Distribution), black comedy with Charlize Theron. Speaking of charm and talent, there is plenty of it in Ocean’s 8, scheduled for July 3 for the second Italian screening. And this year there will be the international convention on Cineturismo, Friday 6 July, in the presence of the Director-General Cinema Nicola Borrelli. An appointment now traditional, strongly desired by the founder of the festival Michelangelo Messina, to take stock of a sector that is now a central reality in our cinema system.

As already stated, Oscar winner Gabriele Salvatores will open the XVI Ischia Film Festival. The director of the Mediterranean will present The Invisible Boy and The Invisible Boy – Second Generation, his diptych dedicated to the adventures of a young superhero. In perfect contemporaneity, at 8:45 pm, Alessandro Aronadio will tell the public the genesis of Io c’è, a mystical and earthly comedy, a return to Ischia for the winner of the best director award last year. The program of the Cathedral of the Assumption is completed with the doc in competition Eu Sunt Hercules, a curious trip to the most popular spa resort in Romania. Also at 8:45 pm, Leonardo Di Costanzo will present at La casa del sole The intruder, fresh winner of the Golden Globe for best film. Following the Israeli doc in competition The Island, set in the French hospital in East Jerusalem St. Louis. At the Bourbon Prison we will find Anna Valle who will introduce the film that opens the feature film competition, L’imperfetta age, followed by Revenir, a story of migrants that inaugurates the Location Negata section.

All film cards, complete with textures, can be found here.

Piazza D’Armi

• 8.45 pm “Let’s talk about cinema” with Gabriele Salvatores

• 9:15 pm The invisible boy by Gabriele Salvatores

• 10:55 pm The Invisible Boy – Second Generation by Gabriele Salvatores

Cathedral of the Assumption

• 8.45 pm “Let’s talk about cinema” with Alessandro Aronadio,

• 9:15 pm I have Alessandro Aronadio

• 10:55 pm Eu Sunt Hercules by Marius Iacob

Casa del Sole

• 8.45 pm “Let’s talk about cinema” with Leonardo Di Costanzo

• 9.00 pm The intruder of Leonardo Di Costanzo

• 10:30 pm The island of Adam Weingord *

Bourbon prison

• 8.45 pm “Let’s talk about cinema” with Ulysses Lendaro and Anna Valle

• 9.00 pm The imperfect age of Ulysses Lendaro

• 22:30 Revenir (to return) by David Fedele and Kumut Imesh

Terrace of Olives

• 9.00 pm Asciola by Edoardo Sandulli *

• 9.10 pm Alfredo Mazzara’s death *

• 9:20 pm “Let’s talk about Cinema” with Alessandro Varisco

• 9:30 pm So close, so far – Beyond the Bullying of Alessandro Varisco

• 10:40 pm Man proposes, God disposes by Daniel Lee

Influential Women at Wellesley

This January, Wellesley College will host several of the world’s most influential women, including Sally Yates, Wendy Sherman, Andrea Mitchell, Katharine H.S. Moon, and Madeleine Albright herself, as part of the Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs ninth annual Wintersession, a three-week intensive program at Wellesley that educates the next generation of women leaders.

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 Highlighted Events

●      On January 8, from 10:45 a.m. to 12 p.m., the Albright Institute welcomes Sally Yates, former U.S. Deputy Attorney General (2015-2017). Yates will present a keynote talk, “Principles Not Policy: Essential Norms in Preserving the Rule of Law,” exploring the vital role of trust in creating stable and just societies. This event will be available via livestream.

●      On January 16, from 2 to 3:30 p.m., a group of North Korea experts will present “Beyond the Headlines: Understanding Korea,” led by Katharine Moon, Edith Stix Wasserman Professor of Asian Studies at Wellesley and nonresident senior fellow with Brookings. This event will be available via livestream.

●      On January 24, beginning at approximately 6:40 p.m., Secretary Albright will present a dinner dialogue entitled “In the Balance: Setting a Course to Restore Democratic Principles” with Wendy R. Sherman, senior counselor at Albright Stonebridge Group and former U.S. Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs (2011 to 2015). This event will be available via livestream.

●      On the final day of Wintersession, January 25, Secretary Albright will join Andrea Mitchell of NBC News speaking at the closing ceremony for Albright Fellows. This event will not be livestreamed. 

About the Albright Institute Wintersession

This year’s Albright Institute Wintersession will educate a cohort of 48 Wellesley student fellows representing 18 countries, 18 U.S. states, and 26 majors. Following two weeks of classes and panels led by prominent speakers, the fellows spend the final week of the program working together in interdisciplinary groups to develop solutions that address a critical world issue. This year’s theme is “Harnessing the Power of Technology: Navigating Truth and Trust in a World Transformed.”

“The Albright Institute is educating the next generation of global leaders—with its interdisciplinary, experiential approach to learning and its expert faculty, talented students, and the powerful and influential women leaders it brings to Wellesley’s campus, including former Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright, Wellesley Class of 1959,” said Wellesley College President Paula A. Johnson. “The global problems we face—including threats to democracy, climate change, and poverty and income inequality—are increasingly complex and fraught, with the potential for worldwide repercussions. The Albright Institute is preparing its students to meet tomorrow’s challenges head on, and the world has never needed them more.”

More on Albright Institute Featured Speakers

Sally Yates, a 27-year veteran of the U.S. Department of Justice, spent more than two decades as a federal prosecutor in Georgia and was appointed U.S. Deputy Attorney General in 2015 by President Barack Obama. She was named acting U.S. Attorney General in January 2017 and served in that position for just 10 days before being fired for defying the Trump administration’s controversial travel ban—an executive order temporarily halting entrance to the United States from seven predominantly Muslim countries. Yates’s talk, “Principles Not Policy: Essential Norms in Preserving the Rule of Law,” will be moderated Lawrence A. Rosenwald, Anne Pierce Rogers Professor of American Literature, professor of English, and co-director of the Peace and Justice Studies program at Wellesley. The talk will be followed by a lunch with the fellows, who will have an opportunity to converse with Yates directly.

Albright Institute Director Joanne Murray said, “No one represents the mission of the Albright Institute better than Sally Yates—cultivating in fellows the habits of principled clarity, bold service, and courageous action to shape a better world.”

During her time as undersecretary of state, Wendy Sherman was the lead U.S. negotiator in the landmark nuclear agreement with Iran. For this and other diplomatic accomplishments, Sherman was awarded the National Security Medal by President Obama. According to Murray, Sherman “demonstrated the ability to bring opposing countries to consensus and to forge trust. She will share what deliberative negotiating means as Albright Fellows sort through potential policy solutions to the problems posed to them.”

The January 16 panel led by Professor Katharine H.S. Moon, “Beyond the Headlines: Understanding Korea,” will feature three panelists: Jieun Baek, a Ph.D. candidate in public policy at the University of Oxford, former research fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard, and author of North Korea’s Hidden Revolution: How the Information Underground is Transforming a Closed SocietyMelissa Hanham, senior research associate in the East Asia Nonproliferation Program; and a third panelist, who works on a variety of causes related to human rights issues, including rights for North Korean defectors in South Korea.

In addition to Yates, Sherman, and these experts, this year’s program will feature an array of other distinguished individuals, including Anne Richard, U.S. assistant secretary of state for population, refugees, and migration from 2012 to 2017, and Jonathan Zittrain, George Bemis Professor of International Law at Harvard Law School and professor at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and faculty director of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society.

About the Albright Institute

The Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs at Wellesley College supports the College’s mission of educating students for leadership in an increasingly complex and interconnected global environment. The program combines the intellectual resources of faculty from Wellesley, researchers from the Wellesley Centers for Women, and leading alumnae and other practitioners and policy makers in the fields of international relations and public policy.

About Wellesley College

Since 1875, Wellesley College has been a leader in providing an excellent liberal arts education for women who will make a difference in the world. Its 500-acre campus near Boston is home to 2,400 undergraduate students from all 50 states and 75 countries.

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