Posts tagged with "immigration"

Equinox Members Feel Bamboozled

After The Related Companies (parent company of Equinox, SoulCycle, Hudson Yards) Founder/Chairman Stephen M. Ross announced his Trump fundraiser (tickets which will cost up to $250,000) in the Hamptons, all hell broke loose – tons of memberships have been cancelled online, over the telephone and in person. After all, Ross is a ‘passive investor’ for Equinox and SoulCycle which are premier fitness centers for celebrities, political leaders and senior level executives alike whom all seem to be proactively involved within the LGBTQ+ and art communities.

Why are members so infuriated?

Many feel they were a part of a movement of societal justice and equality, not just a fitness institution since its inception twenty years ago. Fast forward to present day, Equinox has popped all over every urbane and metropolitan area’s infrastructure largely in part to real estate mogul, Ross.

Lately, the brand has announced a slew of designer duds, hotel chain and talent agency geared towards their top instructors. Today, more or less of its constituents will gather at the West Hollywood location (8590 Sunset Blvd, West Hollywood, CA 90069) at 4PM to protest against Ross’s decision to host such a lavish engagement for one of the most ridiculed US Presidents in modern day times. A man who’s rhetoric has possibly fell upon the ears of young white supremacists like the alleged shooter at El Paso last weekend who gunned down dozens of Hispanic people at a local Walmart.

Maybe after today’s outrage, the Miami Dolphins owner, who was shunned for his actions by some of its players, will renege on tomorrow’s elaborate event. According to the LA Times, the soldout venue may raise close to 12 million dollars for Mr. Ross’s friend of over 40 years.

As of late, Equinox has announced the construction of a 20-story hotel and residential building downtown LA which is scheduled to be completed around 2021.

BEYOND THE CAPE!

April 16 through October 6

Why call this new museum show Beyond the Cape? Compared to so many other exhibitions around the world about comic books, this original and unconventional take soars beyond just superheroes.

Beyond the Cape! Comics and Contemporary Art shows how some of the most currently sought-after contemporary artists are influenced by graphic novels and comic books.

The artworks in this pioneering show making its world premiere at the Boca Raton Museum of Art take viewers on a deeper dive into adult realms, tackling some of today’s thorniest issues: politics, divisiveness, immigration, racial prejudice, planetary climate armageddon, feminism, LGBTQ rights, religion, gender, and more.

Grouped together for the first time in this new way, the exhibition at the Boca Raton Museum of Art features prominent artworld superstars, including:

Kumasi J. Barnett, George Condo, Renee Cox, Liz Craft, Kota Ezawa, Chitra Ganesh, Mark Thomas Gibson, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Christian Marclay, Kerry James Marshall, Takahasi Murakami, Elizabeth Murray, Yoshitomo Nara, Joyce Pensato, Raymond Pettibon, Peter Saul, Kenny Scharf, William T. Wiley, David Wojnarowicz, and Michael Zansky.

Some of the most acclaimed underground comic book artists are also front-and-center, including: R. Crumb, Aline Kominsky-Crumb, and Mimi Pond.

Also featured in the exhibition are artists from The Hairy Who: Gladys Nilsson, Jim Nutt, and Karl Wirsum.

The show features more than 80 works by 40 artists: paintings, video, photography, sculpture, prints, drawings, and tapestries.

Rare comics will also be shown, plus contemporary animation and rarely seen historic cartoons from the early 1900s on vintage TVs.

This exhibition is curated by Kathleen Goncharov, Senior Curator at the museum. She recruited as her ‘muse’ for this exhibition Calvin Reid, the Senior News Editor at Publishers Weekly and a leading expert in the field of comics.

Reid was one of the first critics to recognize comics as a literary form for adults, and selected the comic books and graphic novels in the reading room where the public can comfortably lounge and enjoy reading (many from Reid’s own private library).

“Beyond the Cape delves into the world of comics and graphic novels and their influence on contemporary artists. Their work defies commonalities, but come together to present a boldly visual, eye-opening mirror of our contemporary world and present issues,” said Irvin Lippman, the executive director of Boca Raton Museum of Art.

Some of the surprising twists and turns visitors can see at Beyond the Cape!

Elizabeth Murray began working with comic imagery in the 1970s, when minimalism dominated the art scene. Her personal, colorful work proved that painting was still relevant and ripe for innovation, and set the stage for a return to figurative work in the 1980s. As a child she drew from newspaper comic strips, and even sent a sketchbook to Walt Disney.

Kerry James Marshall’s work is currently at the very top of the art market. Known for his flat, colorful paintings of contemporary Black America, for the past 20 years he has been working on his comic series Rythm Mastr (set in the Black community where his Chicago studio is located).

The genesis of Rythm Mastr began with the demolition of public housing and the spike of violence in Chicago in the 1990s. He grew up in the Watts area of South-Central Los Angeles, and the Civil Rights and Black Power movements impacted this artist’s work.

Most assume comics are primarily intended for children, usually featuring super heroes as evidenced by today’s popular films – but this exhibition is decidedly for adults.

The only references to superheroes in this show are by Renee Cox (whose Jamaican anti-racist avenger Raje does not wear a cape), and Luca Buvoli’s animation Not-a-Superhero.

Art that is flat, graphic and colorful (like the art in graphic novels and comics), is taking center stage in the Instagram age. Artists, galleries and collectors are turning to social media as the place to promote their art and find art to purchase.

Looking beyond the 1960s Pop Art movement led by big name New York artists, this show features the “other” art movements from the 60s and 70s such as Bay Area Funk Art and the Chicago Imagists (who called themselves Hairy Who).

These artists rebelled against the formalist New York style, and during their youth, they were belittled as ‘provincial regionalists’ by the New York-centric art world of the time.

The Chicago artists in Hairy Who (Jim Nutt, Gladys Nilsson, and Karl Wirsum) have greatly influenced younger artists of today.

A nod to Japanese Manga comics and graphic novels features two major artists: Takashi Murakami and Yositomo Nara.

Almost all of the artists in this exhibition are living artists, except for three: Elizabeth Murray, H.C. Westermann and David Wojnarowicz.

Two works by the Indian-American artist Chitra Ganesh. One is titled City Inside Her, (2014), and another is Manuscript, (2018),

a giant 3-D hand with projected henna designs used by women in India and the Middle East

Chitra Ganesh is an Indian-American artist who combines the iconography of Hinduism, Buddhists and South Asia pictorial traditions with the contemporary popular visual language of comics, illustration and science fiction.

Her work will include a giant 3-D hand with projected henna designs used by women in India and the Middle East. She will also show a series of work loosely based on the comic book series Amar Chitra Katha (Immortal Illustrated Stories).

Ganesh’s original comic book premiered in India in 1967 and was intended to teach children traditional historical and religious stories. Unfortunately, the original series reinforced the caste system with its attendant issues of race and gender. In her work, Ganesh flips the script by highlighting alternative feminist narratives.

California artist Peter Saul, 85, was not taken seriously outside of California until relatively recently. Today his work is in great demand and is a major influence on young artists. Similar to comics, his work is irreverent, idiosyncratic, colorful and political.

Koto Ezawa’s comics-inspired animation tells the story of the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum art heist.

Michael Zansky, the son of Louis Zansky who drew the early “Classic Comics” in the 1940s, is a painter and multi-media artist whose monumental large cut, burnt and carved wood panels feature mysterious hybrid creatures inspired by comics, ancient art and works from the Western art canon.

Another family connection is Jody Culkin who is a descendant of Harriet Hosmer, a prominent neo-sculptor who lived in Rome in the 19th century. Hosmer was a scholar, an inventor, writer and feminist. She wrote a play set in London and in the then-future (1977) in which mummies come to life in the British Museum. Featured in this exhibition is the rarely seen animated comic Culkin made about this play.

Kumasi Barnett uses actual comic books in his work to create new characters such as The Amazing Black-Man. His nine works featured in this show will be encased in plastic, the way rare comics are sold.

Moreover, there’s an emerging artist community within Mississauga, Ontario. Hopefully, these types of installations and many more will come with the assistance of Precondo.

THE IKEA READING ROOM

An extensive reading room designed by IKEA features hundreds of graphic novels and comics for the public to comfortably peruse in a relaxed setting.

Selected by Calvin Reid, Senior News Editor at Publishers Weekly, the 200+ comic books and graphic novels include many from his own personal library.

The public can enjoy reading works by Lynda Barry, Allison Bechdel, Roz Chast, R. Crumb, Aline-Kominsky Crumb, Mimi Pond, Trina Robbins, Art Spiegelman, George Takei and Ronald Wimberly, and many others.

Reid began writing in the 1980s, about the same time Art Spiegelman and R. Crumb, alumni of the underground RAW comics, emerged as serious figures in the comic world. Spiegelman’s MAUS is probably the first graphic novel to reach a wide audience.

A goal in providing the reading room is to inspire fans of graphic novels who may not be prone to visit a museum to take the leap, walk into a museum and experience works of art in person. Rare comics and a series of contemporary and historic animation works will also be on view.

Support for this exhibition is generously provided by the Museum’s Leadership Fund, with major funding from: Estate of Ardele L. Garrod, Isadore & Kelly Friedman Foundation, PNC Bank, Jody H. & Martin Grass, Anne & Scott P. Schlesinger, Jennifer & Marc Bell, Dalia & Duane Stiller, Susan & Eric Kane and Laurence W. Levine Foundation, Angela & John DesPrez III, El Ad National Properties and Alina Properties, Joy & Richard Blakeman and Lisette Model Foundation, Karen Mashkin, Patricia Savides, Schmidt Family Foundation, the Museum’s Friends Auxiliary, and those who wish to remain anonymous.

In-kind corporate support for the exhibition is generously provided by IKEA.

— Jellyfish Eyes, by Takashi Murakami, (2003), collection of Beth Rudin DeWoody

Rev. Samuel Rodriguez ‘Fund the Wall and Give Us DACA’

Rev. Samuel Rodriguez issues the following statement on behalf of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference:

“As week three of the current government shutdown drags on, we at the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC) believe now is the time to come together as a nation, and we must do so quickly. We can and we must seize upon one of the great debates of our time, and chisel from the hard stone of division just the sort of compromise which has built the foundations of our national unity so many times before.

“First, we must stop oversimplifying the immigration debate into right and wrong and ‘us’ versus ‘them’. We are unified as a nation not when we agree on specific policies, but rather when we hold fast to the same civic rules on how to reach conclusions to our most difficult questions. Both sides of this debate believe they know what’s best for America, and both believe they know how best to get us there. In that spirit, and in joining with millions of Hispanic Americans all across the country, the NHCLC urgently calls upon both Democrats and Republicans to end our current impasse. We urge Democrats to fund the president’s calls for increased border security, and we likewise call on Republicans to provide a permanent solution for Dreamers.

“The time is now, fund the wall and give us DACA!”

Belly Discusses “Immigrant”

Multi-platinum rapper Belly released debut album “IMMIGRANT” October 12, 2018, via Republic Records. On this album he reflects on his own struggles as a young Muslim immigrant, but also stands in solidarity with immigrants worldwide. The negative rhetoric around immigration reform dominating today’s headlines is more than politics for Belly; it’s a deeply personal, as demonstrated by all the philanthropic work he’s done.

“A personal and reflective ode to immigrants around the world.” – ABC News

“Belly looks towards his next chapter with positivity.” – Billboard

Donald Trump × a “March on Washington”

Dr. Charles Steele, Jr., President and CEO of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), is calling on “all people of good will”, who are outraged by President Donald Trump’s controversial immigration policies, to join the SCLC at its 60th Annual Convention July 12 -15, 2018 in Washington, which will focus on the current conditions of global racism and poverty. Dr. Steele, who heads the organization co-founded and first led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., believes the people’s desire to send a strong message about immigration, poverty and other critical matters in the U.S. could lead to another massive March on Washington like the historic rally inspired by Dr. King nearly 55 years ago on August 28, 1963.

“We’re witnessing partisan political gamesmanship when we should be talking about protecting children,” said Dr. Steele regarding President Trump’s most recent “zero tolerance” immigration policy, which has spark hundreds of demonstrations across the nation. “Separating children from their parents at the border is an abomination! This is a humanitarian disgrace.”

Dr. Steele, who has been actively involved with The Civil Rights Movement for more than 40 years, says he is hopeful that President Trump can find empathy for the thousands of immigrants affected by his policy.

“I recommend that the President considers the human aspect of this tragic situation and not merely the politics,” said Dr. Steele. “Immigrants are trying to get to America because they’re being terrorized in their own homes. They’re faced with daily violence, poor living conditions, and their human rights are being threatened every day.”

Dr. Steele, who is in Brazil examining the international concerns of poor people, added, “I will get a global perspective on the problems afflicting the poor and really highlight their concerns at this year’s conference.”

The 60th Annual Convention will also have a heavy focus on mobilizing large groups of people of color to “get out and vote”. There will be various workshops and panels on the power of voting.

“People are mad, people are moved, and people are fed up. It’s time to use this energy in a constructive manner,” said Dr. Steele, who believes if the people unify around another SCLC- inspired massive rally it can surpass the 250,000 who gathered in Washington in 1963.

The SCLC Convention will run from July 12 to 15 at the Renaissance Hotel in Washington, D.C, 999 9th Street NW. For more information about the 60th Annual SCLC National Convention, please visit their website at nationalsclc.org.

ABOUT THE SCLC: Established in 1957, the SCLC, whose first president was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is a now an international organization made up of chapters and affiliates with programs that affect the lives of all Americans: north, south, east, and west. Its sphere of influence and interests has become international in scope because the human rights movement transcends national boundaries.

Deportados

CNN en Español presented documentary“Deportados”



From left to right: Juan Carlos Lopez, Al Cardenas, Maria Elvira Salazar, Roberto Izurieta, Dan Restrepo and Greisa Martinez

 

Last night in Washington D.C. at the NCTA, CNN en Español presented the investigative documentary “Deportados” by journalists Miguel Ángel Antoñanzas and Ana María Luengo-Romero and produced by CNN en Español.

“Deportados” is a documentary that shows several cases of immigrants where each one explains, in detail, the consequences of living illegally in the United States and how this affects their family, their economy and their social life. The documentary also portrays cases of undocumented youths called “Dreamers” and explores the issues that DACA (Deferred Action for Arrivals in Childhood) is facing.

After the screening, Juan Carlos López, senior political correspondent for CNN en Español, established a discussion on the topic with the following panelists:

Al Cardenas – Lawyer and political advisor to several former presidents of the United States. He has been recognized as “The Best Lawyer in America” and one of the top lobbyists in Washington, DC.

Maria Elvira Salazar – Well-known journalist, television anchor and political analyst for Fox News, Fox Business and Newsmax.

Greisa Martínez – Director of the organization “United we Dream” which represents the young immigrants known as “dreamers”

Dan Restrepo – Political analyst for CNN, and former adviser to President Barack Obama on issues related to Latin America, the Caribbean and Canada.

Roberto Izurieta – Director of Latin American Projects for Graduate School of Political Management (GSPM) at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

Jesús Márquez– Political strategist and political analyst. Part of the National Hispanic Council for President Donald Trump who has become the face of the Hispanic Republican movement in Nevada.

 

The event concluded with a Q&A session.


 

About CNN en Español

The CNN en Español business unit is responsible for several multi-media platforms geared toward Spanish-speaking audiences around the world, including CNN en Español 24 hour cable news for Latin America, Mexico and the U.S. in three separate feeds, reaching 42 million cable and DTH households throughout Latin American and 7.4 million households across the U.S., as well as CNNEspanol.com and CNN en Español Radio, which includes a la carte affiliate radio stations across Latin America, EUROPE and the U.Sincludes a la carte affiliate radio stations across Latin America, EUROPE and the U.S

Third Rail with OZY × Racism

The exclusive poll below was conducted in advance of tonight’s episode of the new series Third Rail with OZY, premiering tonight at 8:30 pm ET on PBS and streaming at pbs.org/thirdrail.

Host Carlos Watson (Emmy Award-winning journalist, Editor in Chief of OZY.com) discusses the related topic “Is America Becoming More – Or Less – Racist?” on tonight’s episode with guests: 

Amber Rose (actress/model); Alonzo Bodden (actor/comedian), Michael Williams (GA State Senator, Republican); Vanita Gupta (CEO of the Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights) and Carrie Sheffield (Founder, Bold.)

Racism remains a prevalent problem in the United States. But many Americans do not think the responsibility to end racism is exclusive to one race. Rather, the responsibility belongs to both black and white people, according to this Exclusive Third Rail with OZY-Marist Poll, commissioned by WGBH Boston and OZY Media for the new PBS prime-time, cross-platform debate program Third Rail with OZY. 

Americans perceive the solution to lie in the hands of everyone, and do not believe black people need to work harder than others to end racism. The disparity in the perception of societal advancement between blacks and whites has not improved. Although half of Americans assert that both black and white people have an equal chance of getting ahead in today’s society, by more than 10-to-one Americans say white people have a better chance than black people of doing so. And, this disparity has changed little over the past 20 years. 

The national survey was conducted by The Marist Poll in advance of this week’s Third Rail with OZY debate, airing Friday, September 15, 2017 at 8:30pm ET (check local listings) and streaming on pbs.org/thirdrail, which asks: Is America becoming more, or less, racist? Third Rail with OZY, hosted by Emmy Award-winning journalist Carlos Watson, is a seven-part cross-platform series. Each week, expert and celebrity guests engage with Watson to debate a timely, provocative topic, incorporating audience and social media input and exclusive national polls. 

The onus to improve race relations is on everyone, according to 60% of Americans. However, 22% of residents believe the responsibility belongs to white people, and 7% say black people need to work on correcting the problem. 

A majority of residents (56%) do not think people of color need to work harder to end racism while 37% believe people of color need to do more. A racial divide exists. African American, (57%) and Latino (42%) residents are more likely than white Americans (32%) to say that people of color need to work harder to end racism. 

“The survey calls to mind the reflections of Martin Luther King Jr., ‘The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice,’” says Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. “But, in its totality, the results demonstrate the arc is bending very slowly, at best.”

Half of Americans (50%) think white and black people have an equal chance of getting ahead in today’s society. This is little changed from 46% of U.S. residents who expressed this view in a 1997 CBS News/New York Times survey. Forty-one percent compared to 43% two decades ago say white people have a better chance at advancing. Only 4% think black people have the edge in getting ahead, similar to 5% in the 1997 survey. 

Again, opinions differ by race. While a majority of white Americans (54%) say both black and white residents have an equal chance of advancing, nearly two-thirds of African Americans (65%) and half of Latinos (50%) report white people have the advantage to move ahead in today’s society. 

Americans perceive racism to be a bigger issue in American society than sexism. Fifty-four percent of U.S. residents consider the nation to be more racist than sexist. Twenty-four percent think America is more sexist than racist. One in ten (10%) say the United States is neither racist nor sexist, and 12% are unsure. Both men (48%) and women (61%) think the country is more racist, but interestingly, men (28%) are more likely than women (19%) to consider it to be more sexist.

“Racism continues to be a defining issue for this nation,” says Denise Dilanni, series creator and Executive in Charge of Third Rail with OZY. “The topic has dominated the public and political arenas in the past year, which is why on Friday we’ll debate the question: Is America becoming more, or less, racist?”

The exclusive Marist/Third Rail with OZY poll asked Americans: do President Donald Trump’s comments about people of color such as Muslims, immigrants, or African Americans make it more or less acceptable for people to make racist comments? A plurality (46%) says it makes it more acceptable, including 63% of African Americans and 53% of Latinos. Thirty-six percent of Americans think the president’s remarks make it less acceptable. Nearly one in five (18%) are unsure. 

Democrats (67%) and independents (49%) are more likely than Republicans (20%) to believe President Trump’s comments about people of color make it more acceptable to make racist comments. Fifty percent of Republicans say his statements make it less acceptable.

More than half of Americans (51%) think the anti-immigration movement is simply about securing the country’s borders while 35% believe it is really an anti-people of color movement. Fourteen percent are unsure. Again, Democrats (63%) African Americans (57%) and Latinos (46%) are more likely than Republicans (5%) and white residents, (29%) to think the anti-immigration movement is about race. 

For more on Third Rail with OZY
pbs.org/thirdrail

#ThirdRailPBS
For more on The Marist Poll: 

maristpoll.marist.edu

#MaristPoll

About The Marist Poll 

Founded in 1978, The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion (MIPO) is a survey research center at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York. The Marist Poll has conducted independent research on public priorities, elections, and a wide variety of social issues. Through the regular public release of surveys, The Marist Poll has built a legacy of independence, reliability, and accuracy. Its results are featured in print and electronic media throughout the world. 

About Third Rail with OZY

Third Rail with OZY is a co-production of WGBH Boston and OZY Media. Host: Carlos Watson. Executive in Charge: Denise DiIanni. Executive Producers: Eugenia Harvey and Cameo George. Funding is provided by Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PBS. Exclusive Third Rail with OZY poll conducted by The Marist Poll, Marist College. Special thanks to collaborator The Conversation. Social media integration by Telescope.

About WGBH Boston

WGBH Boston is one of America’s preeminent public broadcasters and the largest producer of PBS broadcast and digital content, including Frontline, NOVA, American Experience, Masterpiece, Antiques Roadshow, Arthur, as well as other children’s, primetime, and lifestyle series. WGBH also is a major supplier of programming for public radio, and a leader in educational multimedia for the classroom, supplying content to PBS LearningMedia, a free national broadband service for teachers and students. WGBH is a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to those with hearing or visual impairments. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards and Oscars. More information at wgbh.org.

About OZY Media

With 25 million monthly unique users and 2 million subscribers, OZY brings readers “the new and the next,” offering 100% original content, with a focus on the future, via unique OZY News, OZY Magazine, OZY TV and OZY Events products. Called “the new media magnet for the news hungry” by Fortune magazine, OZY’s in-depth and high-quality journalism has attracted a number of high-profile media partners including The New York Times, NPR, PBS NewsHour, TED, The Financial Times, The Huffington Post and many more, as well as guest editors including Bill Gates, President Bill Clinton, and Prime Minister Tony Blair. Founded in 2013 by Emmy award winning journalist Carlos Watson and co-founder Samir Rao, the OZY team is based in Mountain View, CA and backed by leading Silicon Valley investors including Laurene Powell Jobs, Ron Conway, David Drummond, Larry Sonsini and Dan Rosensweig and a significant investment from publishing giant Axel Springer.