Posts tagged with "Hiroshima"

2020 Tokyo Olympic Games

Koshien Stadium (Photo by Joshua Mellin)

In the lead-up to the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games, Japan will play host to a series of noteworthy sporting events taking place across the country throughout 2018 and 2019. Made famous on the world stage for baseball and sumo wrestling, the country offers a wide variety of events of interest to sports enthusiasts and active travelers.
Nippon Baseball Series – October 27, 2018
Considered by many to be Japan’s most popular sport, baseball was first introduced to the Japanese as a prep-school game by an American schoolteacher in the 1870s. Today, both Japan’s professional and high school leagues (or K d;shien) are extremely popular, drawing millions of fans from around the country. Japan’s Nippon Professional Baseball league has even been compared to the United States’ Major League; the league’s reigning champions, the Tokyo-based Yomiuri Giants, have been nicknamed “The New York Yankees of Japan.” The 2018 Nippon Professional Baseball series begins on October 27th and will take place in one of the many stadiums surrounding Tokyo. For more information and schedules, click here.
Cycling Shimanami Bike Tour – October 28, 2018
In October, approximately 7,000 cyclists from around the globe will come together for the Cycling Shimanami Bike Tour, Japan’s most famous cycling event. Known throughout the world as a “Mecca for Cyclists,” the Seto Inland Sea Shimanami Kaido is comprised of a handful of picturesque small islands. Unlike other cycling tours, the courses allow participants to travel from island to island via expressways and bridges. Participants will be matched with one of seven different courses based on their personal skill level and preferences. Throughout the tour, participants will enjoy major scenic attractions, including views of the Seto Inland Sea Shimanami Kaido. The tour will begin in Hiroshima at the Onomichi U2, a renovated warehouse and home to Hotel Cycle, a cyclist hotel with cycle-through check-in and café, bicycle shop, restaurant, bakery, bar and boutique. For more information, click here.
c;mato National Archery Competition, Kyoto – January 13, 2019
The c;mato National Archery Competition is a special archery tournament held each year in Sanjusangen-do, a temple in eastern Kyoto, to commemorate the coming of age for young Japanese men and women. In celebration of their 20th birthdays, approximately 2,000 young adults from across Japan convene at the temple to participate in a contest of aim and skill. The yearly ritual is based on a traditional archery competition called the T d;shiya. After a master archer fires the first shot, the competition commences. Each contestant has two minutes to shoot two arrows at a target set 60 meters away; only those who manage to hit the target both times move on to the next round. Taking place from 9am to 3:30pm, the event is free and attracts many visitors every year. For more information and how to get there, click here.
Marathons Across Japan – January through March 2019
Between January and March of 2019, Japan will host a number of marathons all across the country. Taking place in late January, the Amakusa Marathon is just a 90-minute ferry ride from Goto Island, home of the newly appointed UNESCO World Cultural Heritage site, the Hidden Christian Sites. Also taking place in January is the Ibusuki Marathon (January 13); after the marathon, runners can unwind at the beachfront Ibusuki onsen. Taking place in February 2019 is the Kita-Kyushu Marathon (February 17), the OSJ Amami Jungle Trail Marathon (mid-February), Ehime Marathon (February 10) and Kochi Ryoma Marathon (February 17). In March, runners can participate in the Tokyo Marathon (March 3), the Kagoshima Marathon (March 3), Yoron Marathon (early March) and Tokushima Marathon (late March).
Rugby World Cup – September through November 2019
First held in 1987, the Rugby World Cup is a men’s rugby tournament that takes place every four years, at which 20 of the top teams from across the globe participate. The Rugby World Cup is the world’s third largest sporting event after the Summer Olympics – which is also coming to Japan in 2020 – and the men’s soccer World Cup. From September through November 2019, the Rugby World Cup’s 48 matches will take place at 12 venues throughout Japan including Tokyo, Kumamoto, Yokohama and Sapporo. The tournament will kick off on September 20, 2019 at Tokyo Stadium and will conclude with a final match on November 2, 2019 at Yokohama Stadium in Kanagawa. For more information, click here.
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About Japan National Tourism Organization (JNTO)
As the official tourism board of Japan, JNTO is involved in a wide range of promotional activities to encourage international travelers to visit Japan. Through a variety of campaigns and initiatives, JNTO is inspiring more American travelers to visit Tokyo, Kyoto and beyond, and is raising awareness of Japan in the lead-up to the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

VR DOC × NOBLE PEACE PRIZE RECIPIENT

SURVIVOR TESTIMONY FROM HIROSHIMA ROARS TO LIFE IN TROUBLED TIMES

Tomorrow Never Knows presents The Day the World Changed, in collaboration with ICAN, recipient of the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize

Interactive Virtual Reality Memorial, The Day the World Changed, brings viewers the harrowing impressions of the victims and survivors of atomic bombings and nuclear arms testing through first-hand testimonies, data visualizations, 3-D scanning and photogrammetry.

Premiering April 20-29, in the Virtual Arcade section of the 2018 Tribeca Film Festival

Tomorrow Never Knows, in partnership with the 2017 recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), Nobel Media and the Saul Zaentz Innovation Fund in Film and Media Studies at Johns Hopkins University, has today announced the virtual reality experience, The Day the World Changed, will premiere in the Virtual Arcade that runs April 20-29, at the 2018 Tribeca Film Festival presented by AT&T.

Co-created by award-winning filmmakers and virtual reality pioneers, Gabo Arora and Saschka Unseld, and produced by Jennifer Tiexiera, the social, interactive experience pairs ground-breaking technologies with rare survivor testimonies from Hiroshima to bring the terror of nuclear war to vivid life.

“Over the years, we have been desensitized to the consequences of nuclear war,” said Arora. “We are living in a time when our Commander-in-Chief and leaders of other nations are openly calling for more nuclear weapons, taunting each other over their capabilities. Our intention with this work is to give voice to those victims of nuclear war asking the world to face this shared history and to recognize the true horror of these weapons.”

Added Saschka Unseld, We want this to be an unwavering, uncomfortable experience for people. We want to turn on its head our obsessions and fetishizing of nuclear superiority as a symbol of pride in one’s country, but also to recognize the power of the virtual reality medium. By placing the general public inside the ruins of a tragic event like Hiroshima, we hope to activate a groundswell of support for the abolition of nuclear weapons, and to help ICAN generate momentum in their mission towards elimination.

The Day the World Changed began as an original commission by Nobel Media to showcase the work of the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize-winning organization ICAN, a campaign coalition that works to prohibit and eliminate nuclear weapons.

We find ourselves at one of the most dangerous moments since the dawn of the Atomic Age. It’s at moments like this that we must collectively look back and understand that nuclear weapons are quite simply indiscriminate weapons of mass murder,” said ICAN executive director, Beatrice Fihn. “The Day the World Changed isn’t just a story about the past, it is also about our future it reminds us that these weapons are still here, threatening us, but we can do something about it.”

With that goal in mind, the experience presents a powerful historical record reimagined through new technology via three interactive chapters.

The first explores what led the United States government to develop and drop the world’s first atom bomb on Hiroshima, Japan on August 6, 1945, a catastrophic event that ultimately killed more than 90,000 people. The second chapter examines the aftermath of the bombing as users walk through the ruins of Hiroshima’s only remaining building, and view authentic artifacts left over from that day.

The third chapter advances to the present day as viewers delve into the madness that ensued as the world raced to develop ever-more nuclear weapons.

The experience seeks to pay tribute to the victims of Hiroshima, while recognizing those currently affected by nuclear weapons testing in today’s fraught geo-political climate, proving that change is possible with the right tools and information.

“The Saul Zaentz Innovation Fund prides itself on elevating and empowering voices that have been ignored, voices that aren’t afraid to push the envelope and explore the complexities of what drives us as a society and as individual beings,” said executive producer and director of the Saul Zaentz Innovation Fund in Film and Media Studies at Johns Hopkins University Annette Porter. We are honored to support and participate in this monumental project.

Tomorrow Never Knows CEO and Executive Producer on the project, Nathan Brown, is quick to note the impact The Day the World Changed will have in bridging the gap between art, education and location-based distribution. This project goes far beyond mere technology or storytelling,Éd; he says. It is important experiences like this that have the potential to open up new markets and audiences to the power of immersive storytelling around the world.Éd;

The Day the World Changed was made in partnership with International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), Nobel Media, Sisu Films and Ntropic+Tactic and produced by Tomorrow Never Knows, Jennifer Tiexiera, Tom Lofthouse and Fifer Garbesi, and executive produced by Nathan Brown, Executive Director of ICAN and current Nobel Peace Prize Nobel Laureate, Beatrice Fihn, Mattias Fryenius, Karen Lorenzo, Annette Porter and features original sound design by AntFood.

Tomorrow Never Knowsߣ inaugural feature, the critically-acclaimed ZIKR: A Sufi Revival, premiered at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival, and was later acquired by UK-based distribution company, Dogwoof, becoming the first ever VR documentary to be acquired at a major film festival.

For more information, please visithttps://www.thedaytheworldchanged.world/.

“THE BOMB” DEBUTS ON NETFLIX

Following an extraordinary immersive performance at Glastonbury, The Bomb, will debut on Netflix, August 1. New York York was first and unforgettable, Berlin was timely and now, we write this after a mesmerizing showcase of The Bomb at the 2017 Glastonbury Festival.

With support and technical guidance, Glastonbury built massive 360 degree screens out in the open fields of Somerset. The Acid played three powerful shows over the festival and the audience reacted with open jaws.

Now, thanks to the continued support of our partners, we are thrilled to share The Bomb, with audiences worldwide on Netflix.

There, the film will join classics like Dr. Strangelove and Atomic Cafe, iconic reminders of what nuclear weapons can do to our society and tools to inspire public interest.

Through this new platform, The Bomb, will engage people across the globe, reaching outside of the city center and away from technology hubs, broadening the network of those aware of the threat of nuclear weapons and deepening the conversation throughout society.