Posts tagged with "heritage"

The Martini & Rossi Riserva Speciale Range

AN UNRESERVED STORY OF BITTER & BOTANICALS

The year was 1863 when Alessandro Martini and Luigi Rossi created their first Martini vermouth and began a lifelong quest to place their stamp on Italian culture. Their infamous partnership created the iconic brand that is MARTINI & ROSSI — a household name synonymous with bold heritage, impeccable craftsmanship and unreserved style. Its latest triumph, the Riserva Speciale Range, represents the height of Italian Aperitivi and the art of balance.

Today, the 8th generation MARTINI & ROSSI Master Artisans Giuseppe “Beppe” Musso and Ivano Tonuttiare following in the foot steps of the brand’s founders as dedicated and passionate craftsmen who guard and preserve its quality and integrity. They are two of only four people worldwide to know Luigi Rossi’s original recipes.

Over a century in the making, the Riserva Speciale Rangeis the first permanent line of expressions within MARTINI & ROSSI to be launched in 25 years. Comprised of two iconic Vermouths di Torino—Rubino and Ambrato— along with an incomparable Bitter Liqueur,the entire process of creating one bottle in the MARTINI & ROSSI Riserva Speciale Range takes over one year. The collection is a homage to the brand’s origins, a celebration of the region’s bounty and the ultimate distillation of the MARTINI & ROSSI legacy of innovation and boldness.,representing a new generation of signature aperitifs that will become the tradition of tomorrow.

A protected name of origin, Vermouth di Torino can only be assigned to expertly crafted vermouths that use 100% Italian wines and Artemisia herbs sourced from the Piedmonte region. The MARTINI & ROSSI Ambrato and Rubino Riserva Speciale Vermouths di Torino acknowledge and pay tributeto this guarded name of origin by employing the same time-honored craft that has been passed down from generation to generation. Born and madein Pessione, these acclaimed products are the most authentic expression of the ingredients and style of the region, honoring over a century of winemaking prowess.

Setting the standard for what a Vermouth di Torino represents, MARTINI &ROSSI Master Artisans Beppe Musso and Ivano Tonutti use the same established production practices developed by the first Master Artisans centuries ago, paying homage to their rich roots and heritage. By law, at least one Artemesia herb must be included in a Vermouth di Torino, but to give them true Italian heart and to create a more complex, complete, and rounded sensation, the Masters chose to use three types of local Artemisia.

All grown in nearby fields in Piedmonte, Artemisia Absinthium, commonly known as Wormwood, brings a strongly bitter-herbal character, Artemisia Pontica adds a touch of anise, and Artemisia Vulgaris provides a floral note.

The terroir of the fragrant pastures is essential to the exceptional quality ofthe botanicals used in both the Ambrato Vermouth di Torino and Rubino Vermouth di Torino. The inclusion of all three types brings a new dimensionto the classic taste of Vermouth.

Ambrato Vermouth di Torino

For the Ambrato Vermouth di Torino, Artemisia is blended with other carefully sourced exotic and local herbs and spices including RomanChamomile, Yellow Cinchona bark and Chinese Rhubarb. The ItalianRoman Chamomile emphasizes the fresh floral notes of the artemisia, while the yellow Cinchona bark brings a fresh, mouthwateringly bitter character. The botanicals are added to a neutral grain spirit, steeped, then placed in rotary drums turning at a slow speed for a period of many weeks to create the extracts – liquid elixirs that will be added tothe final blend.

The botanical extracts for the Ambrato are rested for over two months in Piedmontese Tino casks, reminiscent of the process used in the very early days of the company. This complex practice softens the blend of botanicals, creating the desired balance needed in each.

After the botanical extracts are rested, they are then blended with100% Italian wines selected by Master Blender Beppe Musso. LocalMoscato d’Asti DOCG wines, along with crispy and fresh Italian wines, are used to create the distinctive amber Ambrato Vermouth di Torino, adding their soft honeyed and aromatic sweetness. Along with the local Artemesia, Roman Chamomile, Yellow Cinchona Bark andChinese Rhubarb, the end result is a lightly bitter profile that is her baland floral with just a touch of honey to finish.

Rubino Vermouth di Torino

Italian Holy Thistle and Red Sandalwood were specifically selected to imbue the Rubino Vermouth di Torino with their aromatic character and perfectly compliment the three types of ItalianArtemisia. Scarce and highly prized, the sustainably sourced RedSandalwood imparts a delicate spice and woody, bitter note. TheItalian Holy Thistle brings a cooling, energetic, and bitter taste to the mixture. Using the same production process as with Ambrato, each of the carefully selected botanicals are transformed into precious extracts then rested for over two months in order to create a perfectly balanced, harmonious blend of flavors.

Master Blender Beppe Musso carefully blends the botanic extracts with 100% Italian wines once their resting period has ended. The exquisite Riserva Speciale Rubino is brought to life with small amounts of the full-bodied Lang he DOC Nebbiolo wines. These parcels are known to be dark and fruity, characteristics which shine through in the final product. The wines are blended with the extracts of Artemesia, Italian Holy Thistle and Red Sandalwood resulting in a bright ruby red Vermouth di Torino. The delicate balance of botanicals and wine create a full-bodied, herbal and complex style ofVermouth di Torino with a lingering profile and just a touch of spice.

Bitter Liqueur

The crown jewel in the Riserva Speciale Range is undoubtedly the Bitter Liqueur. Inspired by founder Luigi Rossi’s original recipe from 1872, and usingonly 100% natural ingredients, the MARTINI & ROSSI Bitter has been remastered for today’s modern palate.

To compliment the prized Piedmontese Artemisia, Master Herbalist Ivano Tonutti carefully selected three exotic botanicals: Saffron, Angostura andColumba. The Angostura is a pleasing aromatic bitter that imparts a deep flavor which, along with the Artemisia, provides a solid foundation to theBitter Liqueur. Columba is a harmonious bitter that gives a substantial mouth-filling bitter taste while balancing the other botanicals. Finally, Saffron,the “golden spice,” gives the liquid a wonderful end note, intensifying the aromatic bitter qualities, bringing perfume and a lingering finish to the final product.

In total, over twenty different botanicals are used to encompass the complete range of bitter, each delivering an irreplaceable richness and complexity tothe taste profile through different dimensions of bitterness.

To better harmonize all the aromatic ingredients and add roundness to the bitter notes, the botanical extracts are mixed with sugar and a neutral grain spirit then rested in the same traditional Tino casks used for the MARTINI &ROSSI Riserva Speciale Vermouths di Torino. This resting period creates exceptional harmony and balance, integrating the layers of flavor together to create a complete sensation of bitterness. The final product is a one-of-a-kind, versatile liqueur that adds depth, complexity and balance to any cocktail

Master Herbalist Ivano Tonutti

Hailing from Piedmonte, Ivano Tonutti is the 8th Master Herbalist to follow in the foot steps of the legendary Luigi Rossi. The most complex and precious secret atMARTINI & ROSSI is how the taste, aroma and texture of the hand selected botanicals are captured, and for the last 25 years, Tonutti has been embracing this legacy.

Prior to joining the MARTINI & ROSSI family, Tonutti studied in nearby Turin as apharmacist before taking up his role as a Technical Director within the company.He served a lengthy apprenticeship learning the skills and artistry needed before his appointment of Master Herbalist, the most trusted and celebrated role atMARTINI & ROSSI.

A true expert in botanicals and extraction techniques, Tonutti has an intimate knowledge of and rapport with the over forty natural ingredients that are used inMARTINI & ROSSI recipes. Under his guidance, his team of virtuosos ensure every individual botanical meets each rigorous standard set down by the company even before the fundamental taste components are extracted. Hundreds of samples are tasted and rejected until each requirement is met ensuring complete consistency and balance across the Riserva Speciale Range.

MASTER BLENDER GIUSEPPE “BEPPE” MUSSO

Originally from a village just outside the MARTINI & ROSSI home of Pessione, Italy, Giuseppe Musso is the Master Blender for the iconic brand and best known as “Beppe.” He is one of the very few responsible for the century-old recipes atCasa Martini, working to preserve the taste, quality and style of the Riserva Speciale Vermouths di Torino and Bitter Liqueur.

A student of the world-renowned Scuola Enologica di Alba, once Musso completed his training he worked for 10 years as a winemaker producing celebrated wines such as Barolos, Barbarescos, Moscatos and Asti Spumantes. He was always, however, drawn to his native Piedmonte, and returned home to join the MARTINI & ROSSI team where he began working with the quality assurance group getting to know each expression intimately.

In 1993, he was then honored with the opportunity to join Luciano Boero, theMARTINI & ROSSI Master Blender of over thirty years and become part of his team of winemakers. After 18 years of training under his tutelage, Musso succeeded Boero’s tenure once he retired from the company. Now, Musso, with the assistance of his curated team of artisans, sources each wine and leads the delicate blending process of marrying them with the bespoke botanical extracts within the MARTINI & ROSSI portfolio of vermouths and bitter.

NORTH AMERICAN BRAND AMBASSADOR FABIO RAFFAELLI

For almost two decades, Fabio Raffaelli has developed and contributed to bar programs at some of the world’s finest dining institutions, and today, he holds the title of the first-ever MARTINI &ROSSI North American Brand Ambassador. In this role, Raffaelli champions the iconic brand’s acclaimed heritage-rich expressions, and most recently the newly debuted Riserva Speciale Range.

Raffaelli has cultivated a respected reputation thanks to a keen attention to detail, expert palate and high standard for exceptional service. Born in Italy, Raffaelli has bartended in some of the most prestigious bars and restaurants across Europe. He has collaborated with internationally respected chefs including Alain Ducasse, Ferran Adrià, and Gordon Ramsay, as well as the celebrated legendary bartender Salvatore Calabrese. Raffaelli gained a reputation for his service-driven style and impeccable elegance before moving to the U.S.

In 2009 Raffaelli crossed the Atlantic to New York City to bring his expertise in Italian cocktails, spirits and wine to the Michelin Starred Italian restaurant Del Posto. With an expertise and focus on highlighting the diversity and complexity of Italian spirits, Raffaelli completely redesigned the bar program once he arrived, which earned well-deserved praise and critical acclaim. Continuing his career in fine dining, Raffaelli worked with renowned chef Daniel Boulud at DANIEL on the UpperEast Side. During his tenure there, he engineered the restaurant’s show-stopping table-side cocktail service and curated a rotating seasonal menu of cocktails, each highlighting a different spirit, preparation and presentation.

Today, in his role as North American Brand Ambassador and as the face of the brand in NorthAmerica, Raffaelli utilizes his Italian spirits prowess and innate style to raise awareness and build loyalty for the MARTINI & ROSSI Riserva Speciale Range.

Art Of The Wild

Maison Perrier-Jouët presents EDEN by Perrier-Jouët: an ephemeral, immersive experience, taking place at Faena Hotel, in parallel with Design Miami/, the contemporary art fair that the House has collaborated with for the past seven years. On 5th December, the biggest names in Miami came together to discover Art of the Wild, the extravagant universe as seen by the House to re-enchant the everyday through the presence of unbridled nature. It continues to enchant Miami with a packed programme of events.

Maison Perrier-Jouët is taking over Miami, where it unleashed EDEN by Perrier-Jouët: an invitation to delve into the House’s relationship with art and nature that spans back to its foundation. It was the ideal setting for spreading Art of the Wild, the House’s vision of an unexpected and joyful world, where nature reveals itself in all its liberty and exuberance. Reflecting this vibrant spirit, Winnie Harlow hosted a party on 5th December where people from all horizons were brought together for a unique champagne experience.

The House spread Art of the Wild by setting up this space on the beach. It was fitted with graphics created by Luftwerk, a creative duo commissioned by the House last year to interpret its cultural heritage, in particular the anemone motif designed in 1902 by Emile Gallé – one of the masters of Art Nouveau – that adorns bottles from the Perrier-Jouët Belle Epoque collection. The immersion continued with a virtual reality journey that began in the heart of the magnetic nature of Art of the Wild and took guests on an exploration of the House’s cellars in Epernay, Champagne. Rounding things off, a photobooth in the same style was set up to capture highlights of the festivities.

Created for the House by British designer Bethan Laura Wood, HyperNature takes the form of a tree with an extravagant, intense presence. It proposes a new, whimsical champagne experience where flutes can be “plucked” directly from the branches, as a grape might be plucked from a vine. It is also on display in the Collectors Lounge of Design Miami/ throughout the fair.

EDEN by Perrier-Jouët presents two packed days and nights of Art of the Wild events, during which guests can taste a selection of Maison Perrier-Jouët’s cuvées. On the 5th, the House hosted a talk with Bethan Laura Wood, organised by Dazed Arts. On the 6th, Maison Perrier-Jouët is welcoming a creative brunch with food designer Laila Gohar and sunset cocktails to accompany a private trunk show presenting the new jewellery collection by Jade Jagger. Rounding off the residency will be the launch of the CR Fashion Book Calendar with Estee Lauder. A complete schedule covering lifestyle, fashion, food and design, reflecting the House’s openness to all forms of creativity.

At the EDEN by Perrier-Jouët, just as at Design Miami/, the House shares its approach to champagne that stands apart from customary codes, stemming from its creative freedom and unconventional observations of nature, supported by a community of free spirits who share its values. These “Artisans of the Wild” come from a variety of creative fields, including design, fashion and gastronomy – represented by Bethan Laura Wood, Winnie Harlow and Laila Gohar, respectively – as well as art and hospitality. Along with its Artisans of the Wild, the House is writing a new chapter in a story that has been unfolding for over 200 years.

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

Tourism to Turkey

NEW YORK (May 22, 2018) – Tourism to Turkey increased by 50.56 percent in the first quarter of 2018, with a total of 7,263,807 visitors between January and March, according to official figures released by the Turkish Ministry of Culture and Tourism.

The tourism growth coincides with the start of the Year of Troy 2018, which celebrates the 20thanniversary of the archaeological site’s listing on the UNESCO World Cultural Heritage List. As part of the Year of Troy, a calendar of cultural and sporting initiatives will be held throughout the year, including the International Trojan Food Festival-Çanakkale in June and the Trojan Horse Short Film Festival in October.

In support of The Year of Troy, Turkish Airlines launched a “Troia”-themed aircraft. The A321-type aircraft is specially designed with a livery of the Trojan Horse, made famous in Homer’s account of the Trojan War in the epic, Iliad.

Other cultural and tourism highlights from Turkey include:

HERITAGE

  • Following an eight-year restoration project, the 1,600-year-old Theodosius Cistern officially opened to the public in April. The Cistern is believed to date to the reign of the Byzantine emperor Theodosius II and formed part of a 250 km-long system which brought fresh water to the ancient city. Located in Istanbul’s Çemberlitaş neighborhood, the fifth century structure will periodically host art exhibitions and other cultural events.
  • Twelve pieces of the world-famous Zeugma mosaics are to be returned to Turkey, following the signing of an agreement between the Ministry of Culture and Tourism of Turkey and Ohio’s Bowling Green State University. The pieces, forming part of the frame for the infamous “Gypsy Girl” panel, have been held by the university since 1965. On their return, they will be exhibited at the Zeugma Mosaic Museum in Gaziantep.

TOURISM

  • The Ministry of Finance announced incentives to boost medical tourism in Turkey, with the aim to bring 1.5 million health tourism visitors to the country by 2023. Incentives include new investment subsidies and value-added tax (VAT) exemptions for non-resident foreigners using medical institutes accredited by the Ministry of Health.

  • Istanbul Modern, Turkey’s leading contemporary art museum, will move to a new location on Istanbul’s historic waterfront. Designed by the celebrated Italian architect Renzo Piano, the three-year construction project is part of the city’s initiative to restore cultural and historic sites in the Galataport district. The Istanbul Modern will temporarily move to the Union Française building until construction is complete.

HOSPITALITY

  • The first Six Senses resort in Turkey opened on May 1 in Kaplankaya. On the banks of the Aegean Sea, Six Senses Kaplankaya includes 141 guestrooms, six suites and 66 private villas. The hotel’s secluded location offers a range of activities, such as watersports, hiking and nature trails, and cultural experiences. State-of-the-art spa facilities incorporate high-tech science with high-touch therapies, providing a range of pioneering health and wellness regimens.
  • The Galata Istanbul Hotel – MGallery by Sofitel recently opened its doors. The new luxury establishment boasts 83 different rooms and suites, as well as a selection of bars, restaurants and spa facilities, including a traditional Turkish Hammam.
  • EDITION Hotels is launching its new hotel in Bodrum. Overlooking the Aegean Sea, the Bodrum EDITION offers 102 rooms, suites and villas. Facilities include an infinity pool, garden lounge, night club, Turkish Hammam and fitness center. Food options will include an all-day casual dining venue, two bars and a gourmet specialty grill.

GASTRONOMY AND NIGHTLIFE

  • Istanbul’s newly renovated Ulus 29 restaurant reopened in April. An eclectic menu, blending traditional Turkish cuisine with international food trends, makes this stylish restaurant and bar popular with both locals and visitors with views over the Bosporus.
  • The recently-opened MSA Restaurant can be found in Istanbul’s Sakip Sabanci Museum. Owned by the Culinary Arts Academy of Istanbul, instructor chefs and students provide an extensive menu, ranging from local Istanbul street food and Turkish cuisine to popular international dishes.

  • The Populist has recently opened a new branch at Bebek Mahallesi, Neşe Sokak, No: 1. Dating back to 1890, the craft brewery and restaurant remains a firm favorite with locals and tourists alike. Spread over three floors, the décor comprises a unique blend of prohibition-era USA with modern day Istanbul.

  • Rana by Topaz is a new restaurant in the up-and-coming Gümüşsuyu area. The causal tavern-style feel offers a comfortable dining experience, while the ambitious menu combines international and Turkish cuisine.
  • Inspired by the Rolling Stones’ song, Angie is an intimate bar located in Istanbul’s trendy Bebek neighborhood. Offering both live music and DJ performances, its classic feel brings a new dimension to Istanbul’s eclectic nightlife.

  • Hypnos Hall is a new addition to Istanbul’s electronic music scene. The venue will host international DJs and producers, as well as featuring artistic and visual shows.

  • The Ruby night club has recently opened its doors, providing a glamorous nighttime experience in Istanbul. The restaurant boasts a unique range of Turkish and Japanese dishes, to be enjoyed on the garden terrace with panoramic views of the Bosporus. The Ruby’s nightclubs stay open until the early hours, offering both live music and DJ performances with selection of award-winning cocktails.

For more information visit: www.hometurkey.com. For media enquiries, contact: Finn Partners, Haldun Dinccetin haldun.dinccetin@finnpartners.com (212) 754-6500

About Turkey

Turkey is a modern country with a captivating blend of antiquity and contemporary and of East and West. The cradle of civilization and center of world history today stands as one of the fastest-growing tourism destinations in the world. Turkey was the site of the first human settlement; the seat of the Byzantine, Roman and Ottoman Empires; the birthplace of Homer and the last home of the Virgin Mary, just to name a few. Today Turkey, with its spectacular coastline, majestic mountains, cosmopolitan cities and quaint villages is one of the world’s most fascinating destinations.

Coach K teaches a Masterclass

Catch Quality Control Record’s Coach K as he heads to Morehouse College Wednesday night to teach a masterclass with students in Atlanta, 7pm EST, followed by a Q&A at 8pm. The event will be livestreamed Wednesday night on Morehouse TV

 

How does Coach K maintain balance and keep it real while working as   Label Coo, Artist Manager, studio owner, deal broker and – more often than not – Father Figure to Migos, Lil Yachty, Trippie Redd, Lil Baby, Stefflon Don and more?

 

How did he stick to his vision and create his own blueprint for success in the midst of the chaos of dealing with artists and making their visions a reality? 

 

Join the livestream this Wednesday, 7pm at Morehouse College, an historic African American college and the alma mater of many rhodes scholars and civil leaders, including Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Two Wild Women Expeditions

The trail blazer of women-only travel has created two itineraries where few travel. On five departures in 2018, Wild Women Expeditions immerses women in the physically challenging, poignantly stunning landscape of Newfoundland in the remote northeastern corner of Canada.

 

Two distinct, week-long adventures engage guests on Newfoundland’s western shore, separated from Quebec by the Gulf of St. Lawrence that eventually pours into the North Atlantic.

 

This is home turf for Wild Women Expeditions that offers more active travel departures for women only than any other tour operator in the world. The company was founded in Newfoundland and maintains its headquarters here. Owner Jennifer Haddow grew up near Gros Morne National Park where many of the itineraries’ activities take place.

 

“This is a place of stark ancient beauty, where the ground beneath your feet tells the story of Earth’s geological history. It’s also a place where icebergs stroll up and down coastal waters and where fjords claw their way into the interior,” explained Haddow, noting that few other adventure travel companies offer tours here.

 

Indigenous peoples predated the Vikings who arrived some 1000 years ago. England first raised a flag on the North American continent in the late 16th century in what came to be called Newfoundland. Fishermen soon discovered some of the Atlantic’s most productive waters here. The park’s Long Range Mountains testify to this once geologically charged world rife with volcanos and glaciers. These mountains are part of the Appalachian chain rising from Georgia through Maine.

 

“Gros Morne National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is as important to Plate Tectonics Theory as Ecuador’s Galapagos Archipelago is to the Theory of Evolution,” Haddow added. “The challenges of this environment become metaphors for the challenges faced by the women who choose to travel with us.”

 

Hiking first through a barren landscape, women discover where the peridotite ends and ancient oceanic crust begins. They hike through a boreal forest to the rugged coastline where pillow lava and sea stacks dominate the shore. They move to the rich marine wonderland of Bonne Bay and a landlocked lake before summiting Gros Morne Mountain in a hike of up to 10 hours.

 

Following are two 2018 Wild Women Expeditions’ itineraries in Newfoundland. Daily challenges reflect the company’s philosophy that women can discover and build on their own inner strengths by mastering hurdles in the safe company of other women.

 

Newfoundland Gros Morne Multi-Sport Adventure is a seven-day hiking and kayaking expedition in one of the wildest places in Canada. In 2018 there are three departures: July 21-27, Aug. 11-17 and Sept. 8-14. The $2,695 CAD per person rate includes professional local female guides, all meals, six nights shared accommodation in oceanside cabins, fully outfitted sea kayak day trip on Bonne Bay, guided hikes, ground transportation, park pass and Western Brook Pond Fjord boat tour.

 

Guests walk on rugged trails over the Earth’s mantle that supports little to no vegetation, explore fossil remains, visit an artsy village, kayak in a sheltered fjord, witness Minke whales, eagles, terns, and kingfishers in the bay and on land; caribou, Rock ptarmigan and Arctic hare. There’s also time to relax on a boat tour of a land-locked fjord accessed through bogs and limestone ridges. For trip details see http://wildwomenexpeditions.com/trips/newfoundland-multisport/.

 

Icebergs and Arts Adventure is an eight-day wilderness immersion with a hefty dollop of culture on two departures in 2018: June 3-10 and July 6-13. The per person rate of $2,695 CAD includes professional female guides; all meals; seven nights shared accommodation in an authentic house and suites, a wilderness lodge and seaside cabins; guided and fully outfitted sea kayak day; guided hikes and interpretive walks in Gros Morne National Park and along the Great Northern Peninsula; Western Brook Pond Fjord boat tour and iceberg and whale watching boat tour; interpretive tour and lunch at the French Shore Museum in Conche; and a visit to L’Anse aux Meadows National Historic Site, a UNESCO World Heritage Site where Viking history comes alive.

 

At Port aux Choix National Historic Site guests hike to Philips Garden to explore the ancient remains of one of the largest Dorset Paleoeskimo settlements in the Eastern Canadian Arctic. They also visit the Myra Bennett Heritage House, the home of a nurse known along the 200 miles of coast simply as “the nurse.” This remarkable woman brought her life-saving skills to what was then an isolated, rugged Great Northern Peninsula. See: https://wildwomenexpeditions.com/trips/newfoundland/

 

“Canada is a country designed for adventurers. For women who want it all, Canada delivers the goods,” said Haddow. “We’ve been trailblazing outdoor adventures in Canada for over a quarter of a century. Increasingly women want to feel the freedom of connecting with wild space in its finest form. In Canada are some of the wildest and grandest natural treasures on the planet.”

 

Wild Women Expeditions’ Canadian programs are prototypes for the baptism-by-wilderness experiences that Haddow’s team arranges in 26 countries this year. These journeys reflect that… 

  • Women need opportunities to just be themselves, together;
  • The wilderness helps women connect with elements of their psyche that may be lost in the daily hustle and bustle;
  • Pairing women and wilderness often encourages women beyond their comfort zones, leading to increased confidence;
  • These ingredients can be transformational, perhaps leading to answers to the question that Poet Mary Oliver poses: What is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life? 

 

About :

Founded in 1991, Wild Women Expeditions is the world’s largest women-only travel company. Its initial focus was on canoeing on remote Ontario waters. Through an unwavering focus on Canada, one of the wildest, most pristine countries in the world, Wild Women Expeditions became Canadian experts in a pioneering niche that introduced small groups of women into wilderness settings. Even though the company now hosts guests all over the world, it retains a national focus with more trips and more women-only, backcountry camping adventures in Canada than any other women’s travel company in the world.

 

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DISCOVER SOUTH AFRICA x TAX REFUND

It is that time of the year again, when Americans start preparing their tax returns, but there’s good news as most taxpayers can expect to receive an average refund of $2,895 according to the IRS. This year, South African Tourism is once again launching its Tax Refund campaign to encourage savvy travelers and adventure seekers to make the most of their refund with an out-of-this-world trip to South Africa. Partnering with the top US travel trade partners South African Tourism unveils six new exciting packages priced between $1,700-$3,200 to reflect the average tax refund. The packages offer a variety of experiences focusing on romance, adventure and culture throughout South Africa.

 

Today’s favorable exchange rate also guarantees US travelers’ hard-earned refund money goes further than ever in South Africa. South African Tourism is also excited to collaborate with TurboTax® this season on a blog post inspired by South Africa’s 10 most Instagrammable locations which will be live onwww.blog.turbotax.intuit.com/.

 

Whether a history buff, art and culture enthusiast, foodie, adventurer or nature lover, South Africa has something to offer every discerning traveler looking for an affordable vacation. This year’s exclusive deals include:

 

 

  • Gate 1 – 8 Day South Africa Tour with Game Drives & Flights — 8 days and 6 nights
Enjoy the best of Cape Town by exploring Table Mountain and then visit either the Winelands or Cape Peninsula. After a few days in the “Mother City,” head on to Johannesburg to transfer to the safari portion of your trip. You’ll be able to spot all kinds of wildlife while enjoying South Africa’s natural beauty. From US$1699/ Per Person Sharing (includes US $260pp savings with promo code SATD260).
This week, you’ll take a deep dive into exploring Cape Town’s gorgeous sites and vibrant culture. Whether biking through Cape Point, whale watching from the golden shores, or hiking Table Mountain, you’re sure to fall in love with Cape Town. From US $1,999* Per Person Sharing.
  • Great Safaris – Zululand Express Safari — 6 days and 4 nights
Explore the beautiful coastal town of Durban to see a different side of South Africa. Here, you’ll experience the historical melting pot of Indian and African cultures or spend a day relaxing on the beach. Afterwards, you’ll transfer to Thanda Safari Private Game Reserve to partake in game drives and learn about the Zulu tribe members that originally lived there. From US $2,195 Per Person Sharing.
  • Indus Travel – Super South Africa & Dubai — 13 Days and 9 nights
Guests can explore the vibrant city of Johannesburg and a guided tour to the Soweto Township, a cultural melting pot with a wealth of heritage sites that will fascinate any visitor. Visit Kruger National Park before continuing on to Stellenbosch in the heart of the Cape Winelands. Then Visit Cape Town, regularly voted one of the most beautiful cities in the world. From US$2,799* Per Person Sharing.
Enjoy scenic beauty, culture and world class restaurants in Cape Town. Marvel at spectacular views of the Atlantic seaboard from the top of Table Mountain. Explore the Cape Peninsula, on a full-day tour that offers dramatic scenery and endearing penguins. From US $2,999* Per Person Sharing.
Experience the perfect mix of safari and city with this trip to South Africa. After 3 nights of game drives in malaria-free Pilanesberg Game Reserve, couples can retreat to the beach suburb of Cape Town to relax. From US $3,199* Per Person Sharing.

 

 

“South Africa is blessed with breathtaking natural scenery, world-class safari experiences, and adrenaline pumping adventure activities; and with celebrations around the Nelson Mandela Centenary planned throughout 2018, now is the ideal time to visit,” said Bangu Masisi, President of South African Tourism, Americas. “These packages from our partners showcase the variety of exciting travel experiences that are made possible by using your tax refund”. To book these packages or view additional South Africa travel deals, please visit southafrica.net/deals. For more information on South Africa’s rich and diverse offerings visit www.southafrica.net, follow @SouthAfrica on Twitter and @VisitSouthAfrica on Instagram and Facebook.

 

 

Guinness x St. Patrick’s Day

200 Years of Friendship and St. Patrick’s Days : In Time for Milestone St. Patrick’s Day, Guinness is donating $1 to charity for each adult that dons a ‘Stache

This year marks the  200th St. Patrick’s Day Guinness will share with America, the latest reminder of the two-century connection between a legendary brewery and its good friends across the Atlantic. Once again, in the days and weeks leading up to March 17, it’s time for us all to embrace the stories we tell,  the memories we make and the bonds we build over a pint of Guinness.

The Guinness brand is encouraging all Americans, 21 years and older, to make a simple pledge (assuming they’ve already promised to drink responsibly, of course): gather with friends, new or old, toast to the many things we all have in common…and give a ‘Stache. Indeed, this St. Patrick’s Day, the Guinness ‘Stache – that unmistakable hint of foam left behind on the upper lip after the first sip of stout – is back as a symbol of the goodness and the Irish-ness that lives within all of us.

 From now through March 31, 2018, when adult beer lovers share photos of their ‘Staches – self-grown and groomed, drawn-on, or Guinness-enhanced – on social media (tagging @GuinnessUS and using #StacheForCharity), Guinness will donate $1 (up to $100,000) to the Guinness Gives Back Fund*, which supports nonprofits that contribute to the common good in our communities, including Team Rubicon, a veteran-led disaster response organization.

“Over the past 200 years, so much has changed – yet so much has stayed the same, like people coming together to raise a pint of Guinness with their friends on St. Patrick’s Day,” said Guinness Brand Director Emma Giles. “We are proud to be part of such an enduring tradition that celebrates Irish heritage and, when it comes down to it, the power of friendship. The Guinness ‘Stache is a great way to bring that to life in a fun way for a great cause.”

The symbol of the ‘Stache will appear alongside Guinness brand activity at bars and restaurants and on social media throughout the St. Patrick’s Day season, including in some digital content that pays homage to 200 years of mustaches in America. To spread the word about the bonds a ‘Stache can build, the brand is releasing additional digital content that will help us all reflect on the friendships we cherish – and some very recognizable Guinness fans will also get involved in spreading the word.

In addition, it’s time for the latest limited-edition Guinness Draught cans, which will hit shelves in time for St. Patrick’s Day. The ongoing series celebrates the famed Guinness ad campaigns of the 1930s and ‘50s. While it doesn’t have a mustache, the kinkajou – which we thought was a sloth at first – will be featured on this version.

To keep an eye on everything the Guinness brand is doing and to get in on the ‘Stache action, follow @GuinnessUS on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

Whether you’re making a new friend or meeting an old one, having a Guinness Draught, or ordering up any other Guinness beer this St. Patrick’s Day, please respect the beer and drink responsibly.

beer

*The Guinness Gives Back Fund is a corporate donor advised fund administered by Fairfield County’s Community Foundation. The Fund’s mission is to support local charitable organizations which are classified under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code that are aligned with the corporate focus areas of Diageo North America, Inc.

 

Media Contacts:

 

Dave Finn, Taylor

(212) 714-5792 

dfinn@taylorstrategy.com

 

Jim Sias, Diageo

(646) 223-2305

jim.sias@diageo.com