Posts tagged with "heart disease"

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

Congenital Heart Defects: What’s the long term outlook? 

A congenital heart defect is a heart problem that has been there since the time of birth and is one of the most common types of birth defects. Congenital heart defects can affect the blood vessels in the heart, the walls of the heart, or the valves of the heart.

Types Of Congenital Heart Defects

Congenital heart defects can be of various types; some don’t cause any problems while others can lead to complications. Congenital heart defects are related to heart wall defects, heart valve defects, and blood vessel defects. While there are more than 18 types of congenital heart defects, the following are some of the popular types:

  • Ventricular septal defect or VSD
  • Hole in the heart
  • Atrial septal defect or ASD
  • Valve defects
  • Complete atrioventricular canal defect or CAVC
  • Tetralogy of Fallot
  • D-transposition of the great arteries
  • Truncus arteriosus
  • Patent ductus arteriosus or PDA
  • I-transposition of the great arteries

Causes And Symptoms

Congenital heart defects are caused when the structure of the heart is not developed properly early on. The congenital heart defect affects how the blood flows through the heart, which in turn, may affect breathing. The causes of congenital heart defects are as follows: 

  • Illegal drugs or alcohol consumption during pregnancy can lead to a child having a congenital heart defect.
  • If there is a history of heart defects in the family then that could be a cause.
  • If a pregnant woman has a viral infection during the start of her pregnancy then there are higher chances that the child will have a congenital heart defect. 
  • A spike in blood sugar levels can lead to congenital heart disease.
  • Intake of certain drugs during the course of pregnancy may result in the child will have a congenital heart defect. 

Following are the symptoms of congenital heart disease that shows in Newborns:

  • Very low weight at birth
  • Blue fingers, lips, toes, and skin
  • Slow growth compared to normal
  • Difficulty during feeding
  • Inability to breathe properly
  • Pain in the chest

Adults show the following symptoms of congenital heart disease 

  • Difficulty in breathing 
  • Getting tired very easily
  • Chest pain that doesn’t go away quickly
  • Inability to exercise like usual

Some children do not exhibit congenital heart defect symptoms early on after birth. They may show symptoms after a few years. These include swelling, dizziness, tiredness, inability to breathe, feeling dizzy, and abnormal heart rhythms. 

Treatment Options Available: Is Surgery Needed? 

There are numerous treatment options for congenital heart defects but these depend on how severe the problem is. For some people, treatment might not be necessary initially but monitoring of the condition might be necessary. For other people, surgery or medications might be required to treat the problem at hand. 

Sometimes, if a congenital heart defect was treated in childhood can come back during adulthood, due to the original treatment not working anymore. Treatment may not always cure the problem but will enable you to lead a happy and healthy life.

Your doctor might prescribe medicines that enable proper heart function and eliminate the chances of blood clot formation or to have a pacemaker implanted to normalize your heart rate. Else, he may recommend implantable cardioverter defibrillators or ICDs. You might require open-heart surgery for blood vessel widening or heart valve repair. Another treatment option is a catheter procedure that involves using a thin tube instead of making an incision to treat a particular congenital heart defect. You might require a heart transplant surgery if complications occur although this is rare.

Road To Recovery

You should continue to see your doctor after treatment has been completed so that you get proper follow-up care that is important for a speedy recovery. Depending on the treatment you receive, your doctor will inform you about how long the recovery will take and how you can take proper care of yourself. If you have undergone a surgery, then you might need some months to fully recover. Make sure you ask your doctor about what you can safely do and what you should avoid doing while recovering from the treatment. 

Lifestyle Changes To Adopt

If you are pregnant at present or if you are planning on becoming pregnant then it is important that you make some changes to ensure your child does not have any congenital heart defects. You should avoid consuming alcohol and you should not take illegal drugs as these can have a negative impact. You should keep your blood sugar levels in control. If you have diabetes then you should speak to your doctor about managing diabetes. You should take measures to prevent getting German measles if you haven’t been vaccinated for it. You can talk to your doctor about other lifestyle changes you can adopt. 

Joshua S. Yamamoto, M.D., F.A.C.C. ,You Can Prevent A Stroke, 360 MAGAZINE, author, book

World Stroke Day is Coming (Oct. 29th)

By: Joshua S. Yamamoto, M.D., F.A.C.C. (Author, You Can Prevent A Stroke)

The best way to treat a stroke is to prevent it.


Yes, You Can Prevent a Stroke, and remember, prevent is an active verb.


A stroke is damage to the brain from interrupted or inadequate blood. When we don’t get blood to the brain, it dies. Fundamentally, when we maintain adequate circulation to the brain, we prevent strokes.

Recognizing that our circulation naturally ages gives us the chance to be proactive in maintaining our health and preventing the otherwise inevitable changes that cause strokes.

Strokes are considered a “disease of aging.” This is true. But “aging” is much better understood than it once was. Aging is largely predictable. That makes it measurable and manageable. In fact, there is almost no such thing as cardiovascular disease, it’s mostly just natural aging.


Everyone ages, even Olympic athletes. No one is immune. We have 100,000 heart beats a day. That’s a lot of wear and tear. This internal aging is what leads to plaque build-up in arteries, increased strain and work in the heart, and the inevitability of less reliable and irregular heartbeats. These are the internal changes which cause strokes.


“Risk Factors” like diabetes, smoking, unfavorable lipids and higher blood pressure, are best thought of as things that accelerate natural aging. But there are two key things to remember: we are all dealt a genetic hand when we are born. We can not change the cards we are dealt, but we can choose how we play them. Secondly, time always passes.
The inevitable internal changes of aging do not produce symptoms before they lead to brain damage. That’s why we call heart and vascular disease the silent killer. It may be silent, but it is not invisible.


We can see it, long before it causes problems. But you need to look. No one knows their health on the inside until they look, but looking is easy and painless. We can use tools like ultrasound and extended cardiac monitoring. Once you know your health on the inside, then you can work with your doctor to actively prevent a stroke.


Our lifestyle choices and personal effort (that is, our diet and exercise) make a difference, but only to a point. Ultimately, genetics and time will matter more. If we want to prevent a stroke, think: “D-HART.”


Have a Doctor, and ask-


What is the health of my Heart (and how do we know)?


What is the health of my Arteries?


What is my heart’s Rate and Rhythm?


Is it Time to do something or start a medication?


Ask these questions so you can make informed decisions on how to navigate your own aging because, You Can Prevent a Stroke.

Getting to the Heart of the Problem

Although it is well known that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability among all Americans, there is still a misconception that it primarily affects older, white men.

The truth is, the risks are even higher for African Americans. African Americans have higher rates of heart disease risk factors such as hypertension, obesity and diabetes. Currently, 44% of African American men and 48% of African American women have some form of heart disease in the U.S.

Experts say there are several reasons why heart disease disproportionally affects the black community ranging from genetic to environmental factors. There are simple ways to control certain risk factors to reduce your risk for heart disease – it can be as simple as changing your daily habits.

Lifestyle Changes Can Include:
-Healthy diet
-Be physically active every day
-Reduce stress
-Quit smoking

During Heart Health Month, Dr. Wayne Batchelor, an interventional cardiologist and member of the Association of Black Cardiologists, is available to explain what you need to know if you have a risk factor that’s out of your control, how to talk to your doctor and the latest advancements in treatment options.

MACY’S × AHA’S GO RED FOR WOMEN

MACY’S GIVES FROM THE HEART THIS FEBRUARY FOR AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION’S GO RED FOR WOMEN™

Since 2004, Macy’s has raised $65 million to support Go Red For Women in the prevention of heart disease in women.

 

Macy’s unites customers and associates this February for American Heart Month in support of American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement. As the founding national sponsor of Go Red For Women, Macy’s has helped in the prevention of heart disease by raising $65 million since 2004. Fortunately, 80 percent of cardiac events may be prevented with education and lifestyle changes, according to the American Heart Association. This year, Macy’s will continue to offer limited-edition merchandise and promotions to benefit Go Red For Women, helping to fund lifesaving research and awareness that adds more time to women’s lives.

 

Wear Red Sale at Macy’s

Macy’s encourages customers and associates to participate in the Wear Red Sale in-store from Wednesday, Jan. 31 to Monday, Feb. 5, with a pre-sale beginning on Sunday, Jan. 28. Customers can wear red or purchase the official Red Dress pin for $3 to receive 25 percent off a great selection of items storewide, plus an extra 15 or 10 percent off select departments. Exclusions and restrictions apply. One hundred percent of the pin sales will benefit Go Red For Women.

New this year, customers will receive an additional pin to share with a loved one to help spread awareness of the cause. Macy’s associates are invited to wear red in-store to create further awareness of the pin sale and celebrate National Wear Red Day on Feb. 2.

Additionally, Macy’s will invite customers to round up their in-store purchase to the nearest dollar (up to $.99) and donate their change to Go Red For Women from Tuesday, Feb. 6, through Feb. 28.

 

Merchandise That Gives Back

Throughout the month of February, Macy’s will offer exclusive products in stores and online to benefit Go Red For Women. This year, two limited-edition red dresses by Calvin Klein ($134) and Thalia Sodi ($99.50) as well as a specialty t-shirt from Thalia Sodi ($29.50) will give back to the cause. From Feb. 1 through Feb. 28, 10 percent of the purchase price from these limited-edition items will be donated to Go Red For Women.

“As the national founding sponsor of Go Red For Women, Macy’s remains committed to the fight against heart disease in women by raising more than $65 million since 2004,” said Holly Thomas, group vice president of cause marketing at Macy’s. “This cause is near and dear to our hearts, affecting customers and associates in our local communities. By providing different ways for our customers to give back, together we are helping women of all ages and backgrounds live longer, healthier lives.”

 

Go Red For Women Luncheons

Raising additional funds for the cause, Go Red For Women Luncheons will take place in 188 cities across the country. Each luncheon guest will receive a $10 Macy’s gift card and hear from captivating guest speakers. At select luncheons, attendees will have an opportunity to win a $250 Macy’s gift card.

“The American Heart Association is grateful for Macy’s longtime commitment to the Go Red For Women movement, and to ending heart disease and stroke in women. Now, more than ever, Macy’s work with AHA is critically important as cardiovascular diseases claim the life of a woman about every 80 seconds. Every dollar raised helps fund lifesaving research and awareness that adds more time to women’s lives,” said James Postl, American Heart Association chairman of the national board of directors. “This year, we are encouraging women to take action by making a Go Red Commitment. By doing so, women everywhere are standing with us, with Macy’s – together – to further the fight for women’s heart health.”

 

The American Heart Association’s® Go Red For Women® Red Dress Collection,™ presented by Macy’s

As the presenting sponsor of the American Heart Association’s® Go Red For Women® Red Dress Collection™, Macy’s helps shine a spotlight on the issue of heart disease in women. The Red Dress Collection has kicked off New York Fashion Week since 2003 and will be staged this year on Thursday, Feb. 8 at 8 p.m. at The Hammerstein Ballroom in New York City. The star-studded event will feature strong and inspiring female celebrities walking the runway to showcase emerging and established designers. Three of the red dresses featured on the runway will be created by designers in fashion incubator programs, which are housed at Macy’s locations and develop the next generation of fashion trendsetters. The designers-in-residence featured are Dur Doux from DC Fashion Incubator, Lia Larrea from Fashion Incubator San Francisco and Tanesha Prunty from Chicago Fashion Incubator.

For more information about Macy’s programs to support Go Red For Women, visit macys.com/GoRed.

 

About Macy’s

Macy’s, the largest retail brand of Macy’s, Inc. delivers fashion and affordable luxury to customers at approximately 670 locations in 45 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam, as well as to customers in the U.S. and more than 100 international destinations through its leading online store at macys.com. Via its stores, e-commerce site, mobile and social platforms, Macy’s offers distinctive assortments including the most desired family of exclusive and fashion brands for him, her and home. Macy’s is known for such epic events as Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks and the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, as well as spectacular fashion shows, culinary events, flower shows and celebrity appearances. Macy’s flagship stores – including Herald Square in New York City, Union Square in San Francisco, State Street in Chicago, and Dadeland in Miami and South Coast Plaza in southern California – are known internationally and are leading destinations for visitors. Building on a more than 150-year tradition, and with the collective support of customers and employees, Macy’s helps strengthen communities by supporting local and national charities giving more than $54 million each year, plus 180,000 hours of volunteer service, to help make a difference in the lives of our customers.

About Go Red For Women

In the United States, cardiovascular diseases kill approximately 1 in 3 women each year. Go Red For Women is the American Heart Association’s national movement to end heart disease and stroke in women. Cardiovascular diseases in the U.S. kill approximately one woman every 80 seconds. The good news is that 80 percent of cardiac events may be prevented with education and lifestyle changes. Go Red For Women advocates for more research and swifter action for women’s heart health. The American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement is nationally sponsored by Macy’s and CVS Health, with additional support from our cause supporters. For more information, please visit GoRedForWomen.org or call 1-888-MY-HEART (1-888-694-3278).

HIP HOP + HEALTH

SMART RHYMES

VeganSmart uses music to entertain and educate on benefits of a Vegan lifestyle

In the Hip-Hop industry “beefs” among industry heavy weights are quite common and usually addressed in the studio with a diss track. The brand that has successfully built a bridge between hip-hop and health, VeganSmart, is addressing their “beef” with…well…beef and other factors that lead to diet related illness such as diabetes, hyper tension and heart disease with in a new track titled “Wise Words.” 

The single features John Lewis, better known as The Bad Ass Vegan, who drops his dope rhymes, combined with his knowledge, on living a plant-based lifestyle. Lyrics such as “No, it’s not your fault/there’s education out that nobody taught from the time you were born. They got you ready for GMO pork, as a kid when they introduced you to a spork. Man, they’ll put anything together because they know you’ll eat anything they tell ya,” are used not to shame or judge, but encourage people to pay attention to what they are putting in their bodies. Hip-Hop influencers Styles P, DJ Envy, Angela Yee, Lil Cease and even Moby make appearances in the video that accompanies the track.
 
VeganSmart is focused on addressing nutrition-related chronic diseases in underserved communities through education and by offering plant-based solutions to satisfy hunger and improve overall health. Their efforts to spread this message have been successful thanks to a partnership with rapper Styles P and his chain of Juices for Life juice bars. The team has also garnered support in bringing health education to underserved communities from Kappa Alpha Psi® Fraternity Inc.

 
Link to the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCaeNxES_pE
“Wise Words” is available for purchase on iTunes, Google Play and Amazon Music.

 
Claude Tellis and Kareem Cook, VeganSmart co-founders and college friends, have always sought to educate and provide consumers with healthy food choices that would prevent them from diet related illness and poor health. They were responsible for having the state of California ban junk food from vending machines in every Los Angeles public high school and middle school. While banning junk foods in schools across LA is a tremendous accomplishment the men were unsatisfied. They wanted a larger platform to help Americans prevent common illnesses that plague the United States. Both Kareem and Claude’s families and many Americans across the country suffer from hypertension and diabetes, diseases that can be prevented or managed primarily based on diet. This passion lead them to launch of VeganSmart, a line of all-in-one, nutritional shakes. Co-developed with Health and Wellness Expert and Partner, John Lewis, the brand continues to motivate other health and wellness advocates.

 
With no artificial sweeteners, flavors, colors, preservatives, dairy, eggs, gluten or soy, VeganSmart shakes go beyond classic flavors like chocolate and vanilla, with delicious varieties including Wild Berries, Chai, and their newest line, Love is Love that includes flavors like Cookies N’ Cream and Chocolate Raspberry.