Posts tagged with "healthy"

Top Supplements to Keep you Healthy While Traveling

  1. Immune Support – Vitamin C with Bioflavinoids Vitamin C is a great travel add-on. It helps with free radical damage, boosts your immune system before you travel, and supports heart health.
  2. Stress and Energy Support – Cordyceps are great for their enhancing effects on immunological function which can be weakened by stress. They enhance cellular energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), molecules that use chemical energy created from the breakdown of food molecules to fuel other cellular processes.
  3. Digestive Support – Digestive Enzymes when you’re traveling, you’re probably not making your own food. This can mean eating things that you normally wouldn’t, causing some stomach upset. Add this enzyme to help digest those extra tasty, but maybe not on your normal dietary plan, meals.
  4. Sleep Support – Herbal Rest and Melatonin the Sound Slumber support is a one-two punch of herbal support and melatonin to help you rest easy while you are away from your own bed. While melatonin helps ease you to sleep, the herbal rest will help keep you asleep with its unique herbal blend.

The Cravings Solution

Great taste meets good health in a decadent line of low-carb, sugar-free Good Dee’s baking mixes. Born out of a love for baked goods and a passion for healthy living, Good Dee’s proudly uses only the highest-quality, innovative ingredients to deliver low-carb mixes with all of the flavor and no added sugar. Safe for gluten, soy and dairy-free diets, one woman’s lifelong quest to “have her cake and eat it, too” results in a KETO friendly solution the whole family will gladly devour.

For years, Good Dee’s creator and founder Deana Karim searched high and low for the perfect cookie. A lifelong struggle with weight gain and a family history of diabetes limited Karim to low-fat options, which lacked the full flavor of traditional baked goods while hiding some undesirable ingredients of their own. Unable to find an alternative that could satisfy sweet cravings and help maintain a healthy lifestyle, Karim resolved to create her own.

“I realized that if I kept depriving myself and thinking I was on a diet, I would fail,” explains Karim. “I embraced going low-carb and sugar-free and looked up alternative sweeteners. Through months of trial and error, I made a cookie that, after numerous taste tests, got a giant thumbs up.” With overwhelming approval by eaters of all different diets and lifestyles, Karim knew she had something special.

After the birth of Karim’s second child, she set to work launching Good Dee’s. The company featured a variety of baking mixes, from brownies to pancakes to cookies. A first-generation Middle Eastern immigrant who grew up watching her father start and run a successful business, Karim immediately took to entrepreneurship. Now with an expanded collection offering everything from cracker biscuit and grain-free cornbread to blondies and chocolate chip cookie one-bag mixes, Good Dee’s proves that a healthy lifestyle and good eats really do mix.

Shop the full line of mouthwatering grain, wheat, gluten and sugar-free mixes, including all-new coconut and lemon snack cake flavors, just $11.99 each at GoodDees.com. Also try the nut-free collection of brownies, cakes, and muffins. Learn more about this fast-growing company and its founder, Deana Karim, at GoodDees.com. Get inspired by innovative recipes and baking ideas to satisfy every craving on Instagram @GoodDeesMix.

About Good Dee’s:

Created and founded by native Texan-turned-New Yorker Deana Karim, Good Dee’s proves that health-conscious living and decadent indulgence really do mix. Give in to cravings guilt-free with Good Dee’s complete collection of baking mixes designed for low-carb, restricted, and special diets. The tasty solution to a lifetime of deprivation and struggle with weight gain, Good Dee’s offers innovative, full-flavor mixes free of gluten, soy, dairy, wheat, and added sugar. Also available in nut-free brownie, blondies, chocolate snack cake and muffin mix. Learn more and shop all flavors and varieties, priced at just $11.99 each, online at GoodDees.com. Find inspirational recipes and baking ideas on Instagram @GoodDeesMix.

2019 EAT DRINK VEGAN

Written by Krishan Narsinghani × Vaughn Lowery

360 Magazine had the opportunity to cover the 2019 Eat Drink Vegan Fest in Pasadena, CA. With ample amounts of curated vendors, it was a food and drink galore that left guests feeling energized and healthy. Thirst on a ‘Saturday Funday’ was overkill.

Foodies (rather drink connoisseurs) could sample over 250 beverages including kombucha (alcoholic and non-alcoholic), smoothies, beers, wines, blended spicy margaritas, and organic spirits. Talk about quenching your pallet.

Delectable bites from buffalo chicken sandwiches made from soy beans, kimchi fries and chocolate cakes stole the show. Kids enjoyed a playground area while families sprawled across the lush yards within the Rose Bowl Stadium.

For real, an experience that conformed meat-lover tastebuds to a plant-based wonderland.

Why Whole Grain?

Whole grain can contribute to health by changing intestinal serotonin production

Adults consuming whole grain rye have lower plasma serotonin levels than people eating low-fibre wheat bread, according to a recent study by the University of Eastern Finland and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). In the study, the consumption of cereal fibre from rye or wheat was also found to reduce serotonin levels in the colon of mice. In light of the results, the health benefits of whole grain cereals may be linked, at least in part, to the alteration of serotonin production in the intestines, where the majority of the body’s serotonin is produced. The results of were published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

The consumption of whole grain cereals has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. There may be effects on bioactive compounds contained in whole grains, phytochemicals and fibres from which different metabolites are produced by intestinal bacteria.

The new study explored how the consumption of wholegrain rye modulates concentrations of different metabolites in the bloodstream. The study employed untargeted metabolite profiling, also known as metabolomics, which can simultaneously detect numerous metabolites, including those previously unknown.

For the first four weeks of the study, the participants ate 6 to 10 slices a day of low-fibre wheat bread, and then another four weeks the same amount of wholegrain rye bread or wheat bread supplemented with rye fibre. Otherwise, they didn’t change their diet. At the end of both periods, they gave blood samples, which were analysed by a combination of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Their plasma metabolite profiles between the different diet periods were then compared.


The consumption of wholegrain rye led to, among other things, significantly lower serotonin concentrations when compared to consumption of low-fibre wheat bread. The researchers also tested in mice whether the addition of cereal fibre to the diet changes serotonin production in the intestine. The diet of the mice was supplemented for nine weeks with rye bran, wheat bran or cellulose flour. The mice receiving rye or wheat bran had significantly lower serotonin in their colon. For additional information on supplements and how they can modify diets go to website


Serotonin is best known as a neurotransmitter in the brain. However, serotonin produced by the intestines remains separated from the brain, serving various peripheral functions including modulation of gut’s motility. Increased blood serotonin has also been associated with high blood glucose levels.

“Whole grain, on the other hand, is known to reduce the risk of diabetes, and on the basis of these new results, the effect could at least partly be due to a decrease in serotonin levels,” says Academy Research Fellow Kati Hanhineva from the University of Eastern Finland.

The researchers are also interested in the association of serotonin with colorectal cancer.
“Some recent studies have found cancer patients to have higher plasma serotonin levels than healthy controls,” Scientist Pekka Keski-Rahkonen from IARC adds.

The consumption of wholegrain rye bread was also associated with lower plasma concentrations of taurine, glycerophosphocholine and two endogenous glycerophospholipids. In addition, the researchers identified 15 rye phytochemicals whose levels in the bloodstream increased with the consumption of rye fibre.

 

HueApproved Scanner

The Easy & Fun Way to Choose Healthy Products: NEW HueApproved Scanner

If you have ever found yourself looking at labels at the grocery store or online and trying to decide on the best product for you, our HueApproved Scanner will make it easy for you! 
Check out how it works here: 
Our philosophy is simple:
Food as Fuel to Color Your World.

We are a third party, unbiased, wanting to help you make the best lifestyle choices!

We love simple. Easy home cooked meals. Lots of colorful fruits and vegetables. Nutritious products with clean labels. But cutting a pathway through the clutter can be hard work and we need your help.

Nutrients are important. Using the nutrition label or recipe analysis, we check protein, fiber, sodium, sugar, and saturated fat.

Ingredients are important. We look for recipes developed by our HueChefs made with whole minimally processed ingredients and we look for packaged foods with fewer additives.

Behaviors are important. Making time to cook at home is best but we know you need other more convenient options.

And finally the pattern is important. At the end of a day, it’s the sum total of individual choices that determines the pattern. The more variety you bring into your day, the better.

So we envisioned a pattern for a good food day based on nutrients, ingredients, and behaviors. Then we developed a tool to assess how well a product or a recipe compares to that pattern on a scale of 1 to 7.

We sum the scores to get a final value between 1 and 7. The higher the number, the more we approveand we need your help to test it out for us!

To test our tool, please go to:

https://hueapproved.com/scanner/

Please let us know what you think and share with your friends!!!

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA FOR LIVE EVENTS AND PROMOTIONS:

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/HueTrition

TWITTER: https://twitter.com/eathues

INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/huetrition/

PINTEREST: https://www.pinterest.com/HueTrition/

HueTrition™ is a nationally-recognized family wellness program that utilizes cutting-edge technologies to promote a balanced, and active lifestyle that includes a daily variety of colorful fruits and vegetables from an early age while encouraging sensible choices for the planet.

Another New Platform!

HueLive Promo video– 

https://youtu.be/Y25pjd2ycT0

How To Make Healthy Fun & Simple: Personal Chef & Nutrition Expert Online

Ever wondered what it would be like to have your own personal chef and nutrition expert a your place? Check out our new HueTrition Live online space where you can contact experts, attend health & wellness support groups, see healthy culinary events with our Chefs, take online classes & reach your goals all in one! To book your private online session, please visit:

https://huetrition.com/shop/

What can we do to help you achieve your health & wellness goals in 2019? What sort of content would you like to start seeing from us? 

Please comment below any suggestions, or if you have any questions or would like to ask about HueTrition Live, please e-mail us at info@huetrition.com.       

To sign up for any of our Live Events or to have a conversation with our experts, please visit:

https://huetrition.com/shop/

You can get our nee HueTrition ebook How to Make Healthy Fun & Easy, a roadmap to a colorful plant-based diet with link below:

https://huetrition.com/resources/

To Read Full HueApproved Hue Launch Story, please visit:

https://huetrition.com/blog/2019/04/19/introducing-the-hueapproved-scanner/

Sober Houses and the Path to Recovery

The Truth About Sober Houses and the Path to Recovery

by Mallory Neuberger

Wendy Williams made headlines last week when she revealed that she’s living in a sober house; but less than one week later she left work, checked out of the facility, and went on to drink alcohol until she was hospitalized. So, what went wrong?

Sobriety is not something that we can pay for. As a recovering cocaine addict, I had to admit that I was an addict and that I was ready for a drug free life. In essence, I had to hit my bottom. Some people die before they find the willingness to get sober. Others need to end up in prison, homeless, or selling their bodies and souls to feed their disease. And many, like myself, don’t lost their homes, cars, jobs or families, but find themselves spiritually void and miserable, with their drug of choice no longer providing the relief that it once had.

Wendy Williams is going through difficulties in her marriage. Her husband is rumored to be cheating on her, and his mistress is pregnant. Despite appearing on television daily, living in a sober house, and paying a sober coach to keep tabs on her 24/7, she still couldn’t handle her heartbreak and to alcohol to numb her pain. The next day she was back on TV. In my opinion, she isn’t ready.

Ethical sober houses keep residents safe by breathalyzing and drug testing them. They have guidelines to provide structure, including curfews, chore checks, and mandatory attendance at 12-step meetings like A.A. or N.A. There are organizations that certify sober houses as good operators, so it’s important to be sure that you are choosing a place that truly has the residents’ best interests at heart.

Sober houses offer a sense of community. They are filled with residents and staff who are all trying to stay sober and meet life head on. There is always someone to talk to, so we are never alone. In my sober houses we emphasize healthy living, encouraging good eating habits and exercise. We practice yoga and we meditate together. We offer fellowship where we eat, laugh, play games, make crafts, listen to music, and sit by the pool. We celebrate together, helping one another get through birthdays, holidays and anniversaries without picking up. We are houses filled with sober women and we are like a big family filled with surrogate mothers, daughters, sisters, and friends. We cry together, and more importantly, we laugh.

Putting down drugs and alcohol seemed like the only way I could live, but what kind of a life was it going to be? I feared that I would be socially awkward without my expensive wines or a frozen margarita with salt. I didn’t think I would be able to stay awake without my beloved cocaine. I was losing my best friends – drugs and alcohol – how would I ever have fun again?

The sheer happiness that I have found as a sober woman is greater than any high that I ever experienced. I wake up every morning without a hangover or user’s remorse. I dance whenever and wherever I can, even while trying on clothes in stores, or at parties where nobody else has hit the dance floor. I run by the beach, singing out loud, without worrying that I may die of a stroke due to last night’s excesses. I practice yoga and can actually “be” on the mat for ninety minutes, breathing freely through my once stuffed nostrils.

I have a disease, and that disease is called addiction. I am no longer ashamed and hiding behind it. Addiction is not a weakness or a character defect. It is a debilitating disease without a medicine to cure it. Money cannot buy my recovery, but working a daily program can keep me sober, one day at a time. Every day I go to a 12-step meeting. I remind myself that I’m an addict in recovery and I reset my brain and ask for the strength to remain sober just for today. I am of service to others in recovery, showing them that this simple program works. It isn’t always easy, but it is always worth it. My worst day sober is always better than my best day high, because I am authentic and free and living the very best version of myself. I hope that Wendy Williams hits her bottom soon, and without any terrible consequences. I would love her to live in one of my sober houses.

About Mallory Neuberger

Mallory Neuberger, MS, CRRA, author of Sober.House (My Story), is the executive director of The Frog Pad, a safe and structured holistic healing house for women in recovery from drugs and alcohol. After struggling with her own addiction, Neuberger has dedicated her life to helping others find sobriety, volunteering at drug recovery centers including Hazelden IOP, The Addiction Institute in NYC, Gods Love We Deliver, and soup kitchens. She was also employed at Behavior Health of the Palm Beaches before opening her first sober house.

Getting to the Heart of the Problem

Although it is well known that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability among all Americans, there is still a misconception that it primarily affects older, white men.

The truth is, the risks are even higher for African Americans. African Americans have higher rates of heart disease risk factors such as hypertension, obesity and diabetes. Currently, 44% of African American men and 48% of African American women have some form of heart disease in the U.S.

Experts say there are several reasons why heart disease disproportionally affects the black community ranging from genetic to environmental factors. There are simple ways to control certain risk factors to reduce your risk for heart disease – it can be as simple as changing your daily habits.

Lifestyle Changes Can Include:
-Healthy diet
-Be physically active every day
-Reduce stress
-Quit smoking

During Heart Health Month, Dr. Wayne Batchelor, an interventional cardiologist and member of the Association of Black Cardiologists, is available to explain what you need to know if you have a risk factor that’s out of your control, how to talk to your doctor and the latest advancements in treatment options.

Face Transplant Surgery: A New Case Study

A new case study out of New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Developmentfinds that face transplant surgery in patients who have experienced severe facial trauma can improve speech production.

Face transplantation is one of the most extensive facial reconstructive procedures available. The procedure involves the partial or total replacement of nerves, muscles and skeletal structures of the face, head, and neck using donor tissues. With only 41 facial transplant procedures performed worldwide to date, this case study adds to the very limited literature documenting speech production outcomes post-facial transplant. The surgery – which was the first in New York State – was performed by experts at NYU Langone Health’s Face Transplant Program, led by Eduardo Rodriguez, MD, DDS, the Helen L. Kimmel Professor of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery and chair of the Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery.

“Our findings provide a window into the complex recovery process following major facial reconstruction and serve as an important foundation from which we can begin to understand how facial transplant can improve speech production preoperatively to postoperatively,” said Maria I. Grigos, the study’s lead author and associate professor of communicative sciences and disorders at NYU Steinhardt. “Among the many remarkable patterns observed, we found that the patient displayed more flexible control of facial movement as he adapted to the transplanted structures.”

Research Method

Using optical tracking, a form of motion tracking technology, Grigos and her team were able to examine first-hand how the facial transplant procedure alters movement of the face and contributes to improved speech production. Researchers compared data from the case study patient – a male victim who suffered third- and fourth-degree burns and major soft tissue loss in a fire – against four adult males who had not experienced severe facial trauma.

The patient’s speech production and facial movements were examined once before the procedure and four times in the 13 months following the procedure. Movements of the patient’s lips and jaw, as well as the intelligibility of his speech, were compared pre- to post-tranplant and then tracked across the recovery period.

“The remarkable changes that we captured in this patient reflect the multiple processes involved in the reintegration of neuromuscular control and in the learning of new strategies over the recovery period. Such adaptability is a positive indicator that treatment to improve speech production can be effective post–facial transplant surgery,” continued Grigos.

In addition to Grigos, the study’s co-authors include Eduardo D. Rodriguez, Étoile LeBlanc, J. Rodrigo Diaz-Siso and Natalie Plana of the Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery at NYU Langone Health, as well as Christina Hagedorn of the College of Staten Island, City University of New York.

NYU and its affiliated medical center, NYU Langone Health, continue to be pioneers in face transplant surgery and research.

About the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

Located in the heart of New York City’s Greenwich Village, NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development prepares students for careers in the arts, education, health, media and psychology. Since its founding in 1890, the Steinhardt School’s mission has been to expand human capacity through public service, global collaboration, research, scholarship, and practice. To learn more about NYU Steinhardt, visit steinhardt.nyu.edu.

National Drink Wine Day

Cheers! Celebrate National Drink Wine Day by Helping Your Heart, Gut, and Brain

Rosé Piscine, a rosé wine specifically made to drink over ice, serves up some of the health benefits the drink offers

February 18th is National Drink Wine Day, which is a day each year that celebrates the love and health benefits associated with wine. According to the consulting group BW 166, wine sales in the U.S. topped $72.2 billion in 2018, which was nearly a 5 percent increase over the prior year. Clearly, we are nation that loves a good glass of wine, and the more we learn of the health benefits, the more likely more of us will add a bottle to our grocery list.

“People were enjoying a good glass of wine long before the research showed that there are health benefits,” explains Blake Helppie, managing partner at Rosé Piscine, a rosé wine specifically made to drink over ice. “Now we can enjoy our glass of wine and feel good about what it is doing for our body, too. Rarely do we find something that we enjoy so much that also provides health benefits.”

Wine enthusiasts can rejoice as they celebrate National Drink Wine Day this year, because the drink has plenty of research pointing to the fact that it’s a healthy beverage to drink in moderation. What exactly is moderation? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), moderate drinking is up to one drink per day for women and two drinks per day for men. One drink is defined as being four ounces of wine. Further, they recommend that number is not the average consumed over a week, but the amount consumed on any given day.

Most people who enjoy having a glass of wine with their meal love the taste, but they may not be aware of the way it’s helping their body. Here are some of the many health benefits that have been associated with making wine a part of your diet:

  • Heart health The National Institutes of Health reports that studies have shown that adults who drink light to moderate amounts of alcohol may be less likely to develop heart disease than those who do not drink at all or are heavy drinkers.
  • Gut health The April 2017 issue of the journal Current Opinion in Biotechnology included the research results of a study on the health benefits of fermented foods, including wine. The study found that fermented foods, including wine, provide health benefits well beyond the starting food materials, and contain living microorganisms of which some are genetically similar to strains used as probiotics.
  • Diabetes health The April 2017 issue of the journal Endocrine reports that the American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association recommend a Mediterranean diet for improving glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes. It also reports that studies show that higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with a 20-23 % reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The Mediterranean diet is one that includes drinking wine in moderation.
  • Brain health Research out of the University of Rochester Medical Center in 2018 found that drinking wine in moderation was associated with reducing inflammation and helping the brain to clear away toxins, including those that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

“From the brain to gut to your heart, drinking a little wine has health benefits for most people,” added Helppie. “It’s nice to feel good about what you are drinking, whether with dinner, at a party, or at the beach. You can drink some wine and know you are doing your body good.”

Rosé Piscine, a wine that has sold millions of bottles in France and Brazil, recently became available for sale in the United States. Uniquely, it is a wine that has been created to be served over ice. Rosé Piscine is made by Pascal Nacenta in southwest France. The French rosé is 100 percent destemmed, fermented for 20 days with cold stabilization at 60 degrees and then filtered. The final product emerges from stainless steel tanks, offering a floral aroma of white flowers and rose and an exotic fruits finish. Rosé Piscine can be purchased at select stores around the country and online. To find a store near you or to order online, visit the site.

About Rosé Piscine
A unique wine in that it has been created to be served over ice, Rosé Piscine is taking the nation by storm. Over two million bottles of it have already been sold in France and Brazil, and it is now available in the U.S. Rosé Piscine is pale salmon in color, light to medium in body wine and is made from Négrette, a locally indigenous varietal known for its powerful aromatic qualities. For more information on Rosé Piscine or the company, visit the site.

Fitness Advice for New Year’s Resolutions

At the beginning of every year, gyms across the country are buzzing with new members who have made resolutions to lose weight, get back in shape or live a more active lifestyle. However, as the weeks go by, it can be challenging for some to stick to those resolutions. Steve Ball, professor at the University of Missouri and one of the nation’s leading experts on fitness and exercise, says that for resolutions to stick, people need to focus not only on outcome goals, but also goals related to the process of being physically active. You can read more about Dr. Ball’s advice here.

Dr. Ball also has comments on new federal guidelines for physical activity, which suggest that adults should aim for 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity each week, and any amount of time spent doing physical activity now counts toward the goal of active minutes. Prior guidelines had called for at least 10 minutes of activity for it to count.

There are video and audio resources available for broadcast-quality download here. The video features Donna Fox, who has recently made changes to lead a more active lifestyle and considers herself a “gym rat” now after never setting foot in a gym while growing up in the Caribbean.

As January winds down and the thrill of New Year’s resolutions wears off, Dr. Ball’s expertise in fitness and physical activity can be used as encouragement to stay on track with New Year’s fitness resolutions.