Posts tagged with "health"

4 Ways A Great Smile Can Improve Your Life

We’ve all heard that you can’t judge a book by its cover, but the truth is we sometimes make quick judgments about people based on appearance.

One of the first things we see when meeting someone is their smile, and research shows that owning a pleasing smile can significantly influence a person’s life – from their self-esteem to job prospects and even romance.

“A smile is the gateway to your personality, and it also creates an immediate and often lasting perception,” says Steven J. Moravec, an orthodontist and author of Going The Extra Smile: Merging Technology And Expertise For A Lifetime Of Smiles.

“One of the most universal biases is toward pleasant-looking people. Those who smile easily and confidently are often perceived as happier, smarter, and healthier than those with misaligned teeth, who aren’t as comfortable smiling.”

Moravec says there are a number of ways having a consistent smile can improve a person’s life, including:

  • A boost in self-confidence. “Straight teeth are the physical foundation for a smile, which brings confidence personally and professionally,” Moravec says. An Invisalign-Harris Poll survey found 92 percent of adults who straightened their teeth said doing so had been good for their confidence. “Smiling also elevates your mood with the release of endorphins in your brain and creates an overall sense of well-being,” Moravec says.
  • Economic benefits. Crooked teeth can be a disadvantage when competing for a job with someone whose smile reveals straight teeth. Most Americans believe the latter person is more likely to get that job even if the skill sets and experience levels are similar. “Your smile is an investment that will increase in value through the years,” Moravec says.  
  • Enhanced social life. When it comes to attracting a possible mate on a dating site, those with a nice smile and straight teeth are seen as more likely than those with crooked teeth to get a date based on their picture. “Whether a person’s smile and teeth are straight or crooked can have a significant impact on his or her romantic success,” Moravec says. “Teeth play a major role in attractiveness, which also implies good hygiene, personal pride, and by extension a more together person.”
  • Overall health improvement. “Straight teeth are easier to clean,” Moravec says. “You can keep tartar at bay and prevent cavities easier than if you are dealing with overlapping teeth or wide gaps. And because you can control tartar better, this is huge for overall health, because then you can prevent gym or periodontal disease, which has been linked with heart disease, strokes and other chronic conditions.” Also, Moravec notes that realigned teeth and a repositioned bite can help people who have sleep apnea.

“We often take our smile for granted,” Moravec says. “But it’s a gift that leads to many good things in life.”

About Steven J. Moravec, DDS, MS, MA

Steven J. Moravec is the owner of Moravec Orthodontics and the author of Going The Extra Smile: Merging Technology And Expertise For A Lifetime Of Smiles. He graduated from the University of Michigan School of Dentistry and earned an MS in Orthodontics at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He’s a state-licensed  Specialist in Orthodontics and a guest lecturer for the University of Illinois Department of Orthodontics and SureSmile.

Getting to the Heart of the Problem

Although it is well known that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability among all Americans, there is still a misconception that it primarily affects older, white men.

The truth is, the risks are even higher for African Americans. African Americans have higher rates of heart disease risk factors such as hypertension, obesity and diabetes. Currently, 44% of African American men and 48% of African American women have some form of heart disease in the U.S.

Experts say there are several reasons why heart disease disproportionally affects the black community ranging from genetic to environmental factors. There are simple ways to control certain risk factors to reduce your risk for heart disease – it can be as simple as changing your daily habits.

Lifestyle Changes Can Include:
-Healthy diet
-Be physically active every day
-Reduce stress
-Quit smoking

During Heart Health Month, Dr. Wayne Batchelor, an interventional cardiologist and member of the Association of Black Cardiologists, is available to explain what you need to know if you have a risk factor that’s out of your control, how to talk to your doctor and the latest advancements in treatment options.

Face Transplant Surgery: A New Case Study

A new case study out of New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Developmentfinds that face transplant surgery in patients who have experienced severe facial trauma can improve speech production.

Face transplantation is one of the most extensive facial reconstructive procedures available. The procedure involves the partial or total replacement of nerves, muscles and skeletal structures of the face, head, and neck using donor tissues. With only 41 facial transplant procedures performed worldwide to date, this case study adds to the very limited literature documenting speech production outcomes post-facial transplant. The surgery – which was the first in New York State – was performed by experts at NYU Langone Health’s Face Transplant Program, led by Eduardo Rodriguez, MD, DDS, the Helen L. Kimmel Professor of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery and chair of the Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery.

“Our findings provide a window into the complex recovery process following major facial reconstruction and serve as an important foundation from which we can begin to understand how facial transplant can improve speech production preoperatively to postoperatively,” said Maria I. Grigos, the study’s lead author and associate professor of communicative sciences and disorders at NYU Steinhardt. “Among the many remarkable patterns observed, we found that the patient displayed more flexible control of facial movement as he adapted to the transplanted structures.”

Research Method

Using optical tracking, a form of motion tracking technology, Grigos and her team were able to examine first-hand how the facial transplant procedure alters movement of the face and contributes to improved speech production. Researchers compared data from the case study patient – a male victim who suffered third- and fourth-degree burns and major soft tissue loss in a fire – against four adult males who had not experienced severe facial trauma.

The patient’s speech production and facial movements were examined once before the procedure and four times in the 13 months following the procedure. Movements of the patient’s lips and jaw, as well as the intelligibility of his speech, were compared pre- to post-tranplant and then tracked across the recovery period.

“The remarkable changes that we captured in this patient reflect the multiple processes involved in the reintegration of neuromuscular control and in the learning of new strategies over the recovery period. Such adaptability is a positive indicator that treatment to improve speech production can be effective post–facial transplant surgery,” continued Grigos.

In addition to Grigos, the study’s co-authors include Eduardo D. Rodriguez, Étoile LeBlanc, J. Rodrigo Diaz-Siso and Natalie Plana of the Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery at NYU Langone Health, as well as Christina Hagedorn of the College of Staten Island, City University of New York.

NYU and its affiliated medical center, NYU Langone Health, continue to be pioneers in face transplant surgery and research.

About the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

Located in the heart of New York City’s Greenwich Village, NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development prepares students for careers in the arts, education, health, media and psychology. Since its founding in 1890, the Steinhardt School’s mission has been to expand human capacity through public service, global collaboration, research, scholarship, and practice. To learn more about NYU Steinhardt, visit steinhardt.nyu.edu.

How to Trim Your Nails

In the spirit of Valentine’s Day, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology are advising the public about a simple yet important self-care routine: nail grooming. Not only do short, well-manicured nails look great, they say, they are also less likely to harbor dirt and bacteria, which can lead to an infection. In addition, the right nail clipping technique can help prevent common issues like hangnails and ingrown toenails.

“Although trimming your nails seems pretty straightforward, there are some important steps you should follow to ensure a healthy cut” via @AADskin

“Short nails stay cleaner and break less often, which is good for both your appearance and your health,” says board-certified dermatologist and nail specialist Shari Lipner, MD, PhD, FAAD. “Although nail clipping seems pretty straightforward, there are some important steps you should follow to ensure a healthy cut, like disinfecting your tools and leaving your cuticles alone.”

To properly trim your nails, Dr. Lipner recommends the following tips:

  • Soften the nails. The best time to trim your nails is immediately after taking a bath or shower. However, if that isn’t possible, soak your nails in lukewarm water for a few minutes to soften them.
  • Gather the proper tools. Use a nail clipper or nail scissors for your fingernails and a toenail clipper for your toenails. Remember to disinfect your tools monthly. To disinfect them, soak a small scrub brush in a bowl of 70 to 90 percent isopropyl alcohol and then use the brush to scrub your nail clippers or nail scissors. Afterwards, rinse the tools in hot water and dry them completely before putting them away.
  • To trim your fingernails, cut almost straight across the nail. Use a nail file or emery board to slightly round the nails at the corners, as this will help keep them strong and prevent them from catching on things like clothing or furniture.
  • To reduce your chances of getting an ingrown toenail, cut straight across when trimming your toenails. Toenails grow more slowly than fingernails, so you may find that you do not need to trim these nails as often.
  • Smooth uneven or rough edges using a nail file or emery board. Always file the nail in the same direction, as filing back and forth can weaken your nails.
  • Leave your cuticles alone. Cuticles protect the nail root, so it’s important to avoid cutting your cuticles or pushing them back. When you trim or cut your cuticles, it’s easier for bacteria and other germs to get inside your body and cause an infection. If you get a nail infection, it can sometimes take a long time to clear.
  • Moisturize after trimming to help keep your nails flexible. This is especially important when the air is dry, as dry nails split more easily.

“Nails are a reflection of your overall health,” Dr. Lipner says. “Keep an eye on your nails, and if you notice a change in the color, texture or shape of your nail, see a board-certified dermatologist. While some changes are harmless, others could be a sign of a disease, such as melanoma, or an infection, such as a nail fungal infection.”

These tips are demonstrated in “How to Trim Your Nails,” a video posted to the AAD website and YouTube channel. This video is part of the AAD’s “Video of the Month” series, which offers tips people can use to properly care for their skin, hair and nails. A new video in the series posts to the AAD website and YouTube channel each month.

About the AAD

Headquartered in Rosemont, Ill., the American Academy of Dermatology, founded in 1938, is the largest, most influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations. With a membership of more than 20,000 physicians worldwide, the AAD is committed to: advancing the diagnosis and medical, surgical and cosmetic treatment of the skin, hair and nails; advocating high standards in clinical practice, education, and research in dermatology; and supporting and enhancing patient care for a lifetime of healthier skin, hair and nails. For more information, contact the AAD at (888) 462-DERM (3376) or aad.org.

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Sports Tours International Spring Marathons

Sports Tours International Invites Runners to Back-to-Back April 2019 Marathons in Rome and Paris

Two European capitals are gearing up for April 2019 when hordes of marathoners create their own spectacles while running through the ancient streets first of Rome and a few days later of Paris.

In 2018, the two cities combined hosted some 56,000 runners who took up the challenge of cobblestone streets and promenades flanked by some of the world’s most remarkable antiquities and architecture.

Sports Tours International, the pros at securing hotel packages and entry into prestigious running and cycling events around the globe, again this spring has lined up hotels (breakfasts included) convenient to the marathons and the services of its seasoned reps who will pamper and prep runners in advance of these events.

Rome Marathon 2019 is first up on Sunday, April 7. Every year 16,000 runners from over 130 countries come to Rome to explore ancient ruins such as the Roman Forum and the Colosseum during the Maratona di Roma weekend. Runners may obtain in advance a three-night (April 6-8) plan that includes overnight accommodations for three nights at the four-star Mercure Centro Colosseo, daily breakfasts, local assistance and a pasta party with beverages. The per person rate is from £529. Sports Tours International can also book entry into the marathon from now through Feb. 28 at £75 and from March 1-25 at £85. For details see here.

After running in the Eternal City, marathoners have until April 12 to get to the City of Lights for Paris Marathon 2019 on April 14. Sports Tours International stands ready to arrange accommodation in other places along the way. In Paris itself packages are available for two, three or four nights with two hotel options from £219 per person. With accommodation and daily breakfast come running rep services and guaranteed entry into the race. An early booking entry fee available for a limited time is £75 per entry. Staff service on the Paris Marathon includes a Marathon race briefing, daily hotel visits, an escorted trip to the Marathon Expo on Friday and Saturday and an escorted trip to the Marathon start.

The Paris Marathon, attracting over 40,000 runners annually, was established in 1977 during the beginning of a craze for big city, international marathons. There are now more than 23,000 runners from abroad, making up 40 percent of the field. The 26.2-mile running and sightseeing journey begins on one of the world’s most famous streets, Les Champs Elysées. From the foot of the Arc de Triomphe the route heads towards the Place de la Concorde. From the Rue de Rivoli runners sweep through the Place de la Bastille. Then comes a glimpse of greenery in the Bois de Vincennes which has views of Notre Dame and Eiffel Tower before reaching the finish line on the Avenue Foch.

Sports Tours International’s operations executive Simon is a huge fan of this race. Find out why he loves it here.

For Paris Marathon packages please see here.

Sports Tours International suggests booking race packages early. For more information, available packages, space availability and reservations please visit online, email: sales@sportstoursinternational.co.uk, or call: (+44) 161 703 8161.

Sports Tours International is Europe’s leading specialist in sports travel. Since inception in 1973 they have hosted thousands of participants and spectators at major sporting events worldwide. With the tagline, Our experience will make yours, the company’s initial roots came from a devotion to running when founder Vince Regan began taking runners to the NYC Marathon. Since the early 2000s, the company now embraces international cycling events, triathlon competitions, sports training camps and corporate hospitality.

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Lawsuit Against Anthem/WellStar

Atlanta area attorneys Jason Doss and Joy Doss will announce the filing of a major lawsuit in the growing controversy over the disruption of medical services to thousands of Georgia residents in the wake of Anthem, Inc./Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Georgia, Inc. (Anthem) enticing new customers to switch health insurance providers during the latest open enrollment period to Anthem with the promise that Georgia’s largest health care provider, WellStar Health System Inc. (WellStar), would be an in-network provider. The details of the lawsuit will not be announced until the time of the phone-based news conference.

WHAT:

During the most recent open health care enrollment period of November and December of 2018, Anthem engaged in a health insurance coverage marketing scheme that lead consumers across Georgia consumers to purchase individual and family health insurance policies to believe that they would continue to have in-network access to the doctors, specialists, and hospital facilities of Georgia’s largest healthcare provider, WellStar. One month into the new plan coverage period and with customers locked into Anthem until January 1, 2019, WellStar is no longer an in-network provider under the Anthem Pathway health insurance plan.

WHO:

  • Jason Doss, attorney, The Doss Firm, LLC, Atlanta area.
  • Joy Doss, attorney, The Doss Firm, LLC, Atlanta area.
  • A Marietta area woman who has significant health issues requiring nine specialists will have to replace the majority of her WellStar specialists as well as her primary care physician from whom she has had treatment for 20 years.
  • An Atlanta area man who has had significant heart problems since 2004 and was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2016 will no longer be able to see the same WellStar physicians and specialists for treatment.

WHEN:

1:30 p.m. p.m. EST, Tuesday, February 5, 2019.

WHERE:

Reporters can join this live, phone-based news conference (with full, two-way Q&A) by dialing 1 (877) 418-4267. Ask for the “Anthem/WellStar” news event. A streaming audio recording of the news event will be available on the Web as of 5 p.m. EST on February 5, 2019 athttps://www.dossfirm.com/.

MEDIA CONTACT:   Whitney Dunlap, (703) 229-1489 or wdunlap@hastingsgroup.com.

6 Choices to Make Your Mental & Physical Goals a Success in 2019

According to U.S. News, approximately 80% of resolutions fail by the second week in February. Why? Because dramatic and immediate changes are not sustainable long-term.

So this year, make 2019 not a year of resolutions or diets but one of incremental changes to instill habits that create real long-lasting results. Here are 6 tips:

Do What You Enjoy:

Commit to trying new things or even old things to remind yourself of what you enjoy. This is especially true for keeping active and fulfilling your body’s desire for movement and exercise. This can be taking frequent walks through nature, biking, dancing, hiking, or yoga. Start taking ballroom dancing lessons that you promised yourself you would try years ago. Take a barre method class where you can let your inner ballerina shine. Better yet, put that music on full blast while you are preparing dinner and dance like no one’s watching. It is not about perfection, it is about finding what you love to do and what brings a smile to your face, then it becomes fun and not something you want to do.

Add Things, Don’t Remove Them:

If your goal is to improve your nutrition to lose weight and improve your energy levels, try adding foods into your diet like vegetables. Find fun ways to prepare them to fit your taste buds. Often times if you start with a deprivation statement like, “I am going to stop eating all carbs,” then the only thing you will think about is carbs. When you introduce something new and start noticing the benefits of that change, then you are often inspired to move on to add the next change. Think addition not deprivation!

Stop Eating by 6pm:

If you want to encourage the body to burn fat for energy, stop eating by 6 or 7pm. This allows the body to put most of its energy into rejuvenating and restoring the body for the next day. It also gives the body all time it needs to use up all the sugar storage in the liver so then it can start burning the fat cells for needed energy.

Take 5 Minutes to Stop & Breathe:

If one of your goals is to start being more mindful or to simply start incorporating some relaxation techniques to help you react to stressful events with more ease then perhaps going from not meditating to promising to meditate every day for 45 minutes a day may be a bit overwhelming.

Try this simple strategy, wake up in the morning take a deep breath, record in a journal or on your phone one thing you are grateful for, appreciate or just makes you happy. Read it out loud and then follow with 5 slow breaths and really feel that joy. This way you are starting the habit and getting your body used to what relaxation and being in a state of gratitude feels like. During the day when things get hectic, pull out that book or play that recording and take 5 deep breaths. Fast, easy and often times very effective for decreasing the effects of those stress reactions.

Go to Bed 15 Minutes Earlier:

Work on getting a good night’s rest. A healthy amount of sleep helps you to be more alert, make better decisions, maintain a healthier weight and helps you to look and feel younger. Go to bed 15 minutes earlier each week for a month so you total an hour more of sleep. Remove all electronic devices in the bedroom that gives off artificial light and creating a bedtime routine that signals the body that it is time for bed.

Spend Your Time with Like-Minded People:

Make an effort to spend more quality time reconnecting with family or friends.  Individuals who have social connections suffer less symptoms of depression and may live longer healthier, lives. Also, establishing a support group can help to stay on track with our goals. This may look like once every two weeks to a month spending some time with your girlfriends or skyping or face timing them to catch up.

Making these gradual changes can help you to create habits that will help to feel more energized, feel less stressed, think more clearly and make better choices for you. With each choice comes the opportunity to be the person you have always envisioned.

Eudene Harry MD is the medical director for Oasis Wellness and Rejuvenation Center, a wellness practice devoted to integrative holistic care. She is a veteran physician with over 20 years of experience. Dr. Harry earned her medical degree and performed her residency at Thomas Jefferson University.

Dr. Harry is the author of three books designed to empower the individual to get started on their path to optimal health. She has published extensively on the topics of reducing stress, healthy lifestyle choices, and regaining youthfulness. Her most recent book, Be Iconic: Healthy and Sexy at Any Ageis now available on Amazon.

National Drink Wine Day

Cheers! Celebrate National Drink Wine Day by Helping Your Heart, Gut, and Brain

Rosé Piscine, a rosé wine specifically made to drink over ice, serves up some of the health benefits the drink offers

February 18th is National Drink Wine Day, which is a day each year that celebrates the love and health benefits associated with wine. According to the consulting group BW 166, wine sales in the U.S. topped $72.2 billion in 2018, which was nearly a 5 percent increase over the prior year. Clearly, we are nation that loves a good glass of wine, and the more we learn of the health benefits, the more likely more of us will add a bottle to our grocery list.

“People were enjoying a good glass of wine long before the research showed that there are health benefits,” explains Blake Helppie, managing partner at Rosé Piscine, a rosé wine specifically made to drink over ice. “Now we can enjoy our glass of wine and feel good about what it is doing for our body, too. Rarely do we find something that we enjoy so much that also provides health benefits.”

Wine enthusiasts can rejoice as they celebrate National Drink Wine Day this year, because the drink has plenty of research pointing to the fact that it’s a healthy beverage to drink in moderation. What exactly is moderation? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), moderate drinking is up to one drink per day for women and two drinks per day for men. One drink is defined as being four ounces of wine. Further, they recommend that number is not the average consumed over a week, but the amount consumed on any given day.

Most people who enjoy having a glass of wine with their meal love the taste, but they may not be aware of the way it’s helping their body. Here are some of the many health benefits that have been associated with making wine a part of your diet:

  • Heart health The National Institutes of Health reports that studies have shown that adults who drink light to moderate amounts of alcohol may be less likely to develop heart disease than those who do not drink at all or are heavy drinkers.
  • Gut health The April 2017 issue of the journal Current Opinion in Biotechnology included the research results of a study on the health benefits of fermented foods, including wine. The study found that fermented foods, including wine, provide health benefits well beyond the starting food materials, and contain living microorganisms of which some are genetically similar to strains used as probiotics.
  • Diabetes health The April 2017 issue of the journal Endocrine reports that the American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association recommend a Mediterranean diet for improving glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes. It also reports that studies show that higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with a 20-23 % reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The Mediterranean diet is one that includes drinking wine in moderation.
  • Brain health Research out of the University of Rochester Medical Center in 2018 found that drinking wine in moderation was associated with reducing inflammation and helping the brain to clear away toxins, including those that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

“From the brain to gut to your heart, drinking a little wine has health benefits for most people,” added Helppie. “It’s nice to feel good about what you are drinking, whether with dinner, at a party, or at the beach. You can drink some wine and know you are doing your body good.”

Rosé Piscine, a wine that has sold millions of bottles in France and Brazil, recently became available for sale in the United States. Uniquely, it is a wine that has been created to be served over ice. Rosé Piscine is made by Pascal Nacenta in southwest France. The French rosé is 100 percent destemmed, fermented for 20 days with cold stabilization at 60 degrees and then filtered. The final product emerges from stainless steel tanks, offering a floral aroma of white flowers and rose and an exotic fruits finish. Rosé Piscine can be purchased at select stores around the country and online. To find a store near you or to order online, visit the site.

About Rosé Piscine
A unique wine in that it has been created to be served over ice, Rosé Piscine is taking the nation by storm. Over two million bottles of it have already been sold in France and Brazil, and it is now available in the U.S. Rosé Piscine is pale salmon in color, light to medium in body wine and is made from Négrette, a locally indigenous varietal known for its powerful aromatic qualities. For more information on Rosé Piscine or the company, visit the site.

Rise in Obesity-Related Cancers

A new analysis, published in the Lancet Public Health, raises the alarm that the rates of obesity-related cancers are rising in younger and younger adults. In the new study, six of twelve types of obesity-related cancers have significantly increased between 1995-2014 and the risk of these cancers is increasing in each successive younger age group. These cancers include colorectal, pancreatic, gallbladder, kidney cancer and multiple myeloma (a type of blood cancer). These cancer types are particularly concerning because they are very serious and account for over 150,000 deaths in the U.S. every year.

“These numbers are worrying but not surprising; the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) recently sounded the alarm that having overweight and obesity cause at least 12 types of cancer. However, the younger and younger age bracket in which we see rates increasing is even more troubling and demands a response. We cannot just watch these rates go up and ignore the factors that we know are contributing to these increases,” says Dr. Nigel Brockton, Vice President of Research at AICR.

Disturbingly, over 70% of Americans have overweight or obesity according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And AICR maintains that cancer risk increases across each higher category of Body Mass Index (BMI) as an indicator of body fatness (Healthy = 18.5-24.9, Overweight = 25-29.9, and Obesity = 30 and above).

A mere five BMI points (kg/m2) separate the three basic (healthy, overweight, obese) BMI categories. It is important to emphasize that cancer risk is not limited to the extreme category of obesity only, the risk increases for those with overweight too. For example, compared to those having healthy BMI range overweight category face an increased liver cancer risk of 30% and those having obesity of 60%.

The recent AICR Energy Balance and Body Fatness Report presented strong evidence for factors that can reduce risk of having weight gain, overweight and obesity, including walking, aerobic physical activity, food containing fiber and a “Mediterranean-type” diets rich in fruits and vegetables that reduce the risk of weight gain, overweight and obesity. Conversely, sugar-sweetened drinks, fast foods and a “Western type” diet rich in meats and energy-dense proteins are strongly linked to increased weight gain, overweight and obesity.

The Report also points to the evidence that greater screen time is a cause of weight gain, overweight and obesity in children. This is particularly relevant in light of the Lancet study that discussed the onset of cancer at an early age, since children with overweight and obesity are likely to turn into young adults in a similar status. There is enormous opportunity to prevent future cancer cases, if changes can be made to stop and reverse the current trend of increasing overweight and obesity. In addition to helping individuals learn about healthy lifestyle choices, community and national policies play a crucial role in creating living spaces more conducive to physical activity and healthier food choices.

AICR is urging Congress and federal agencies to improve funding for cancer prevention research, ensure that federal nutrition and physical activity guidelines reflect the latest research regarding cancer risk, improve nutrition labeling and improve access to lifestyle interventions.

Cure for Cancer in Israel

Cancer Researchers in Israel Believe They Will Have A Cure For Cancer In 1 Year

Promising Research with Multi-Agent Toxins

According to the WHO/International Agency for Research on Cancer, 18.1 million cancer cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. Cancer is now the second leading cause of death behind cardiovascular diseases. It is imperative now, more than ever, that we continue to seek new methods to treat this devastating illness.

Recently, Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies did an interview where stated they believe that they will “offer in a year’s time a complete cure for cancer”. Although it grabs headlines, that is a momentous statement to make. Let’s dig a little deeper into the work that they are currently doing. The premise behind their treatment involves using a multi-agent target toxin treatment to treat cancer. In the past, this type of therapy targeted toxin treatment has involved the introduction of DNA coding for a protein (can be an antibody) into a bacteriophage – which is a virus that infects bacteria. These proteins can then be displayed on the surface of the virus and interact with its surroundings.
The company’s therapy involves a similar phenomenon, but with the use of peptides instead of proteins. Peptides consist of two or more amino acids linked together in a chain. They are smaller than proteins, can serve biological functions, and in many ways are less expensive to reproduce.

Most cancer therapies aim at attacking a target in a cell, on the surface of a particular cell, or in one of its internal pathways.

However, a mutation in one of these targets can make the therapy ineffective. What is being done here, with multi-target toxin therapy, is that several peptides of the cancer cell are being targeted with a peptide toxin to avoid mutations rendering a therapy ineffective. The more targets used, the less likely that a series of mutations will occur simultaneously that will make the therapy ineffective. This will help in not allowing the cancer cell to evade the treatment and continue to replicate, even with some mutations occurring.

This may have the ability to reduce side effects as well, given that the peptides will aim to attack specific targets on the cancer cells that are typically not overexpressed in other healthy cells. In addition, since the peptides are small (the ones they have developed are about 12 amino acids long) and lack a rigid structure, it allows them access to regions of the cell that may be blocked if a larger protein was used.

Overall, they are using a “combination modality” in a very specific manner for an attack of each cancer cell in this therapy. Combinational therapy has been successful before with cancer, HIV, and autoimmune disease among others. The goal of the company is to eventually personalize this to each patient by having a biopsy sent and analyzed for the receptors that it over expresses. The patient would then be administered an individualized concoction developed to treat the disease.

This is exciting and has potential, but more data needs to be presented. Thus far they have concluded mice experimentation and found inhibited human cancer cell growth that did not affect healthy mice cells. They are currently working on beginning a round of clinical trials, which many people will be eager to see the conclusions. Recently, Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies has been writing patents on a variety of different specific peptides. While their work thus far is enthusing and making headlines, their claim to “offer in a year’s time a complete cure for cancer” is likely premature. Yet, I don’t know a single person, including myself, who wouldn’t hope for that.

Joshua Mansour, M.D. is a board-certified hematologist and oncologist in Stanford, California.  He is currently doing additional work in the field of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Immunotherapy.