Posts tagged with "health conscious"

MIT: Liver transplant deaths reduced by 20%

Demand for liver transplants is much higher than organ supply, resulting in approximately 2,400 deaths every year. Also problematic is the current model used to identify and prioritize the “sickest” patients, which does not allow for equitable access to all waitlisted candidates, with a particular disadvantage to women. To address these issues, MIT Sloan School of Management Prof. Dimitris Bertsimas and Prof. Nikos Trichakis utilized machine learning to create a model that reduces mortality by 20%, averting nearly 400 deaths each year. Their model, Optimized Prediction of Mortality (OPOM), also provides a fairer and more equitable allocation to candidate groups, including women.

“There are many significant benefits to using this new model over the current system. Unlike the current system, which makes some arbitrary choices and results in bias against certain populations, OPOM’s methodology for prioritization is clear and understandable to surgeons — and it can save hundreds of additional lives every year,” says Bertsimas.

Trichakis noted, “OPOM fixes many of the current system’s problems because it was designed specifically for liver patients using real data. As a result, it can accurately prioritize patients across all populations without bias. This shows the potential of machine learning technology to help guide clinical practice and national policy on transplants.”

The researchers explain that the current model created in 2002 depends on the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score to rank disease severity and priority for receiving a liver transplant. As certain patient populations are at risk of death or of becoming too sick or unsuitable for transplantation based upon disease progressions that are not captured in their MELD score, the system arbitrarily grants them “exception” points. While the overall MELD score has led to a more objective ranking of candidates awaiting liver transplantation, the process of MELD exception point granting has resulted in inequitable and undesirable outcomes.

More specifically, the MELD exception points policy has disadvantaged women. “Data shows that women have historically had less access to liver transplantation and have had higher death rates on the wait list,” notes Trichakis. “This is due to the awarding of exception points to cancer patients, as more than 75% of those patients are men. Women also tend to have lower muscle mass and higher sodium levels, which lowers their MELD scores.”

Using a state-of-the-art machine learning method developed at the MIT Operations Research Center and real historical data from liver patients, the researchers sought a better way to prioritize the allocation of organs. With OPOM, they asked the question: What is the probability that a patient will either die or become unsuitable for liver transplantation within three months, given his or her individual characteristics?

They found that the OPOM allocation outperformed the MELD-based prediction method in terms of accuracy and fairness. In simulations, OPOM averted significantly more waitlist deaths and removed the bias against women. As a result, it allowed for more equitable and efficient allocation of liver transplants.

“Unlike MELD, which relies on an inexact approach of exception point assignment, OPOM allows for accurate prioritization of all candidates and removes bias for or against particular groups,” says Trichakis.

Bertsimas adds, “If we use this model to change how we measure mortality and allocate livers, the death rate will decrease by 20%, which is very significant. We’re hopeful that our findings will affect the national policy.”

Bertsimas and Trichakis are coauthors of “Development and validation of an Optimized Prediction of Mortality (OPOM) for candidates awaiting liver transplantation” with transplant surgeons Dr. Ryutaro Hirose of the University of California and Dr. Parsia A. Vagefi of the University of Southwestern Medical Center. Additional coauthors include MIT Sloan students Yuchen Wang and Jerry Kung. Their paper has appeared online in the American Journal for Transplantation.

WIXTER MARKET

WIXTER MARKET COLLABORATES WITH FAHLSTROM’S FRESH FISH MARKET TO OFFER THE LARGEST SELECTION OF CONSERVAS IN CHICAGO

Conservas Arrive At Fahlstrom’s Fresh Fish Market Bringing An Extensive Selection of Quality Seafood to the Midwest

Wixter Market (2110 W. Division St) is collaborating with Fahlstrom’s Fresh Fish Market (1258 W Belmont Ave) to install twenty-nine of Wixter Market’s conservas, or tinned seafood products.

On the heels of the launch of Wixter Market’s new distribution program, the addition of a wide variety of conservas at Fahlstrom’s Fresh Fish Market signifies the beginning of Wixter Market’s exclusive product being more widely available to any shopper interested in sourcing sustainably harvested seafood products. The restaurant and market operated by Glenn Fahlstrom has become a neighborhood staple, serving freshly prepared seafood dishes alongside a working fish market which retails superior sustainably sourced product without antibiotics and growth hormones at a more accessible price point than larger commercial competitors. The extension of Fahlstrom’s Fresh Fish Market to include such a broad selection of Wixter Market’s tinned seafood products is a logical wholesale partnership that exhibits the premium sourcing of quality seafood from around the world that is becoming available in Chicago.

Conservas, which are tins of seafood prized for the high-quality and fresh preservation of product, have also been steadily gaining popularity in the gourmet food market scene. Natural and delicious seafood in an easily transportable container with beautiful packaging make these items ideal for the quickly approaching holiday season and beyond. W ixter Market offers two lines of sustainably sourced tinned fish including La Brújula (Spain) and Jose Gourmet (Portugal) both of which are now carried by Fahlstrom’s Fresh Fish Market . With this relationship with Fahlstrom’s Fresh Fish Market as a partner restaurant, conservas are available from the retail market in a range of prices from $5.65 up to $43.75. For more of a shareable experience, customers can enjoy plated conservas from the bar where your tin of choice is served with accompanying bites including warm toasted bread, whipped butter, thick cut caramelized onions with rosemary, roasted garlic, shaved aged parmesan cheese, spicy capicola ham, dijon mustard and housemade seasonal jam.

The full line of conservas from La Brujula and Jose Gourmet are always available from Wixter Market’s retail shop in Wicker Park (as well as will be available soon on www.wixtermarket.com ). However, for those closer to the north side neighborhoods, Fahlstrom’s Fresh Fish Market provides additional access to a well-rounded selection of tinned seafood offerings.

Gift Guide × Health Conscious Foodie

(Photo credit— VeganSmart Instagram)

Each holiday is filled with homemade recipes and delicious snacks, making it a foodie’s favorite time of year. This year, instead of gifting the foodie in your life one of their favorite treats, why not step it up by introducing them to new, healthy flavors their taste buds will love. 
 
Below are some healthy picks that are sure to shake up every foodie’s holiday!

 
For the foodies who love spicy:

MINA Classic Moroccan Harissa, Shakshuka and Tagine’s spice up the flavor of your food, add nutrients to your health and easily up your cooking game. What can be used as a sauce, dip or spread, Mina Moroccan sauces are versatile in its ability to add heat to any dish, as well as make Moroccan cuisine quick and easy.


For the foodies who like a little crunch:

The newest superfood, Wine RayZyn, is a hand-harvested wine grape naturally toasted and caramelized, keeping the skin and seeds intact to provide unprecedented amounts of fiber, nutrients, and antioxidants—not to mention, a delicious crunch. RayZyn can be added to all your salads, baked goods, side dishes and more!

 

 
For the trendy foodies:

Olitalia, an Italian-based and globally loved olive oil and vinegar company, is introducing their line of balsamic-based Drink Vinegar to the U.S. market just in time for the holidays. Available on Amazon and nationwide in October, Drink Vinegar helps improve metabolism, enhance digestion, serves as an excellent source of Potassium, Calcium, Vitamin B2 and B3 AND can restore your skin’s natural beauty and radiance.

 

 
For the foodies always on the go:

VeganSmart, a line of delicious, plant-based nutritional shake, with no dairy, eggs, soy, artificial sweeteners, flavors, colors, preservatives, cholesterol, acesulfame-K, MSG, and zero trans-fat, is the perfect way to stay full and keep your energy up during the busy holiday season. Containing 5 different non-GMO plant based proteins, VeganSmart provides the essential amino acids for building and repairing tissue and muscle.