Posts tagged with "graphic design"

five iron golf, painting, interior decor, nyc, 360 MAGAZINE

Why a Painting Is the Perfect Gift

For most of us, giving a present to a loved one means given the latest, expensive gadget because it goes to show the depth of our love for them. But do gadgets really express timeless love? Not in our opinion. For gifting something that would express your timeless love and commitment and how much you cherish your bond, paintings make it to the top of the list. You may wonder why a painting is the perfect gift. Well there are plenty of reasons why paintings are valuable gifts and here are some of them. 

Paintings last lifelong and hold more emotional value. But in addition to these, there are more reasons why paintings make a better choice.

Timelessness

When buying a present, most people wish to give something that will last lifelong. However, when items like gadgets, perfumes or such are given they last only for a short while and the essence of the gift disappears just as soon as the product becomes unusable. Even if it is something as expensive as an iphone it will certainly not last more than 3 years. 

Paintings on the other hand are priceless treasures whose value does not diminish with the passing of time. Of course new paintings are introduced in the art market regularly but that does not take away the value of the old ones even slightly. A painting becomes a steady and a permanent part of your life and its presence is something one never ceases to enjoy. 

Hence, if you’re looking for something that will forever remind your loved one about you and retain its value for years then a painting is truly the perfect choice for a gift.

Art Evokes Emotions

Gift items such as perfumes, gadgets, food items rarely evoke any emotions. Yes, they do make a person happy for that feeling does not last for a very long time. As long as a commodity is new and popular in the market, it gives a feeling of satisfaction to its owners, but once something better replaces it in the market, the value of it also diminishes in the eyes of the owner. The interest in using it is also thus lost. They also lose their place of honor in the lives of the people they are gifted to.

However, where paintings are concerned, people relate to them in their own individual ways. Often times, people can feel the emotions portrayed in paintings flowing through them. This is the primary reasons why paintings can make a perfect gift choice for someone. It is a great medium of expressing emotions.

Easy Maintenance and Eco-Friendly

Most other gift items are mode out of materials that cause great damage and harm to the nature. Look at gadgets for example. Not only do gadgets have to be handled with extraordinary care they also come with certainty of failure in future. Can one mobile phone function all of a person’s life? Most definitely not.

Paintings on the contrary require very little care by the owner. They can remain intact while being hung on the walls for years and still not lose their beauty. The only maintenance they require once in a while is for the dust to be wiped off. It really is that simple, eco-friendly and completely low on maintenance. 

Paintings Improve the Quality of Life

If the word of art lovers can’t convince you then science most certainly would. Art, as proved by science researches, promotes the quality of life and makes a person feel good emotionally and mentally.

A neurobiologist, Professor Semir Zaki from the University College of London says that when a person stares at an artwork, its effect is to stimulate the part of the brain the same way when falling in love does. The brain releases dopamine, which is a feel-good chemical when one falls romantically for another. In this process, feelings of affection and attachment are evoked which are quite pleasurable.

The same pleasurable feelings are evoked when a person closely observes great artworks. Artworks by Constable, Turner and Monet and masterpieces like Sandro Botticelli’s ‘The Birth of Venus’, are like therapy for the minds. 

Paintings also often motivate a person to positively change their ways of life. There are several paintings which portray moral ideas such as the painting of a Hindu Lord Krishna, uplifting and teaching a depressed Arjuna. Such paintings inspire the good in people and if your gift can do something similar for your beloved, how great it would be.

Paintings Also Have Affordable Options

It is true that original paintings usually require huge chunks of cash. But why not settle for the alternatives? It is after all the thought that counts, not the money spent that matters. Most other gift items do not come with affordable alternatives. If it is an expensive gadget you decide upon but don’t have the resources for, what would be your alternative? Possibly something that is cloned or a lower end version. 

This does not happen with paintings. There are multiple options suiting every budget range. You can settle for canvas prints, reproductions or posters. These alternatives only cost a fraction of the originals but do no compromise on any qualities which the originals offer except perhaps only the monetary appreciation of an original. But gifting your beloved a painting, you gift them a treasure that will last them a lifetime. What could be better than that?

Art is Treasure

With the passage of time, what is valuable today will become trash tomorrow. Paintings however, never become trash. They have their own way of becoming a person’s most valuable treasure which only increases in importance as the years advance. Any original but ordinary painting bought today can turn into tomorrow’s most priceless possessions, which rarely happens with any other item. 

One only needs to take a look around the art history for evidence. The most expensive and most sought after paintings today are the ones that were created centuries and decades ago. If you gift a painting to your beloved, you most likely give them a treasure for life.

Art is Personal

Gifts that hold personal value are even more special than the others. It is commonly believed that taste in art is considered personal. This works well when you want to gift something to someone you care deeply for. When you buy someone a painting suited to their tastes, you actually show them how well you understand their preferences, know what aligns well with their interests or reflect their vibrant personalities. This goes a long way in expressing the thought and effort you put in to make your loved feel special.

Nordstrom, NYC, flagship, rendering, fashion, top retailers, 360 MAGAZINE

NORDSTROM NYC FLAGSHIP

By Armon Hayes × Vaughn Lowery

Co-President, Pete Nordstrom, along side of corporate partners hosted a tour for retailer’s newly largest single project investment in their history. On Oct 24th, Nordstrom will launch its first flagship in Manhattan since the 1920s. An exclusive onestop shop adjacent to the Nordstrom Men’s store located on West 57th street & Broadway. The seven-level flagship store, designed in collaboration with James Carpenter Design Associates, forms in the base of the ‘tallest residential building in the Western Hemisphere.’ With 320,000 square feet, it will embody an experience which is responsive and reflective of its customers. After all, a great design encourages people to stay longer and shop more. And, with 19-foot ceilings, it’s an open canvas for an interchangeable yet flexible floor plan.

The new floor plan allows for discovery, with range to explore and transition through brands freely that they haven’t experienced before. The infrastructure is designed to funnel natural light through transparency with floor to ceiling glass, intertwining the shopping experience to the city’s skyline. The atrium possesses a waveform glass façade which allows for interaction from customers inside and out. Chain-mail veils and lighting installations lend character to the location, reflecting the city’s cultural events as well as major holidays. 

“A rapidly growing younger consumer who’s engaged has emerged,” asserts Pete Nordstrom. Instinctively creating a new culture and how we shop that’s relevant to life experiences. Today one-third of sales are e-commerce, which represents 30% of Nordstrom’s business.

For over 100 years, the retailer has stood the test of time. The climate of brick and mortar for many retailers have shrunk and/or has become nonexistent. Nordstrom understands as their customer evolves, their level of service and retail atmosphere should be elevated as well. Using technology and innovation, the new store’s communication system will allow employees to order beverages and/or garments throughout the location.

In addition, customers will have access to 24/7 buy online & pickup, in-store personal stylists and tailoring while you wait. The Vice President of Creative Projects, Olivia Kim, has fabricated initiatives like Pop-In@ Nordstrom – an exclusive space for emerging designers. Merchandising will include a curated depth of products (clothing, accessories, shoes, beauty, children’s, home etc) across price points.

Lastly, there will be 7 food and beverage options with 4 full-service restaurants, 2 bars and an innovative, gluten-free doughnut stand:

¤ Shoe Bar will feature handcrafted cocktails, speciality coffee drinks and a selection of small plates.

¤ 2 restaurants are in collaboration with Chef Tom Douglas.

¤ 1 restaurant is in collaboration with Chef Ethan Stowell.

For a mega metropolis that’s often explored while on foot, this fashion marquee’s newest residence seems to be long overdue.

AMERICAN ART TO WEAR

Museum Presents Major Exhibition of Art to Wear

Off the Wall: American Art to Wear – November 10, 2019 – May 17, 2020

This fall, the Philadelphia Museum of Art presents Off the Wall: American Art to Wear, a major exhibition that highlights a distinctive American art movement that emerged in the late 1960s and flourished during the following decades. It examines a generation of pioneering artists who used body-related forms to express a personal vision and frames their work in relation to the cultural, historical and social concerns of their time. Focusing on iconic works made during the three decades between 1967 and 1997, the exhibition features over one hundred one-of-a-kind works by more than fifty artists. Comprised primarily of selections from a promised gift of Julie Schafler Dale, it will also include works from the museum’s collection and loans from private collections. Off the Wall: American Art to Wear is accompanied by a new publication of the same title, co-published by the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University Press.

Timothy Rub, the George D. Widener Director and CEO, said: “This exhibition will introduce to our visitors an exceptionally creative and adventurous aspect of American art which took the body as a vehicle for its expression. We are not only deeply grateful to Julie Dale for her extraordinary gifts and support of the museum but also see this as an opportunity to acknowledge the dynamic role she played in nurturing the growth and development of this movement.”

The champions of Art to Wear during the early years were a few forward-thinking museums, among them New York’s Museum of Contemporary Crafts (Museum of Art and Design), collectors, and galleries such as Sandra Sakata’s Obiko, founded in 1972 in San Francisco, and Julie Schafler Dale’s Julie: Artisans Gallery, which opened the following year on Madison Avenue in New York. For over 40 years, Dale’s gallery was a premier destination for presenting one-of-a-kind wearable works by American artists. Through her gallery installations and rotating window displays, she gave visibility to the Art to Wear movement. In 1986, she brought further recognition to the art form by publishing the seminal book Art to Wear—from which the title of this exhibition is taken—which provided in-depth profiles of artists alongside photographs by Brazilian fashion photographer Otta Stupakoff. Dale’s gallery closed in 2013.

Off the Wall is arranged in nine sections; the titles of some are derived from popular music of the ‘60s and ‘70s to suggest the wide-ranging concerns of the artists. The introductory section, The Times They Are A Changin’ (Bob Dylan, 1964), contains works by Lenore Tawney, Dorian Zachai, Claire Zeisler, Ed Rossbach, and Debra Rapoport to illustrate how textile artists in the late ‘50s and ‘60s liberated tapestry weaving from the wall, adapting it to three-dimensional sculptural forms inspired by pre-Columbian weaving. In 1969, a group of five students at Pratt Institute studying painting, sculpture, industrial design, multimedia, and graphic design taught each other how to crochet, leading to remarkable outcomes. Janet Lipkin, Jean Cacicedo, Marika Contompasis, Sharron Hedges, and Dina Knapp all created clothing-related forms that they would describe as wearable sculpture, thus establishing a cornerstone of the Art to Wear movement. A highlight in this section is a wool crochet and knit Samurai Top, 1972, by Sharron Hedges, modeled by the young Julie Dale for the book Creative Crochet, authored by two of the artist’s friends, Nicki Hitz Edson and Arlene Stimmel.

The next section, Good Vibrations (Beach Boys, 1966), traces the migration of many of these young artists from the East Coast to the West Coast where they joined California’s vibrant artistic community and connected with Sandra Sakata’s Obiko. A pair of colorful denim hand-embroidered mini shorts by Anna VA Polesny embroidered while traveling conveys this new youthful spirit. Pacific Rim influences are evident in the Japanese kimono form as a blank canvas offering infinite possibilities for pattern and design. Katherine Westpahl’s indigo blue resist-dyed cotton work, A Fantasy Meeting of Santa Claus with Big Julie and Tyrone at McDonald’s, 1978, and Janet Lipkin’s Mexico at Midday, a coat made in 1988 are exceptional examples. A range of counter-culture influences, evoking ceremony and spirituality, pervade this section.

Come Together (The Beatles, 1969) responds to the popular use of assemblage in art-making, especially the use of nontraditional materials. It also looks at the art of performance, reflected in Ben Compton and Marian Clayden’s Nocturnal Moth, 1974, inspired by Federico Fellini’s film La Dolce Vita (1960). “Mother Earth,” a nod to the publication Mother Earth News Magazine, looks to nature and environmental concerns while This Land is Your Land (Woodie Guthrie, 1940) explores iconic American imagery including reference to the American West and Native American cultures. Examples in this section include Joan Ann Jablow’s Big Bird cape, 1977, made entirely of recycled bird feathers, and Joan Steiner’s Manhattan Collar, 1979, which reimagines New York’s skyline in miniature.

Other Worlds explores fantasy and science fiction, two genres that offered young people an escape from the period’s cultural and political upheavals. Noteworthy here are works by Jean Cacicedo and Nina Huryn, both of whom riff on one of the most widely read English language books at the time, J.R.R. Tolkien’s trilogy Lord of the Rings (1965). Cacicedo responded with a portrait of Treebeard, 1973, a Tolkien character, while Huryn created her own fantasy world in Tree Outfit, with its flowing pants, loose shirt and leather sleeveless jacket containing forest and folklore imagery, a work made especially for Julie: Artisans Gallery in 1976. Other artists turned to dreams, such as Susanna Lewis, who created Moth Cape, 1979, in response to a nightmare that she had of a giant moth enveloping her body.

A section called I Am Woman (Helen Reddy, 1971) underscores the ways in which artists invoked feminism directly and indirectly in Art to Wear. Janet Lipkin, for example, invested her works with symbols of freedom while searching for new directions in her life, as seen in Bird Coat, 1972, Flamingo, 1982, and Transforming Woman, 1992. Other works like Combat Vest, 1985, by Sheila Perez, feature plastic toy soldiers as protective armor for the chest area, while Nicki Hitz Edson’s Medusa Mask, 1975, is a wild expression of fraught emotions surrounding the breakup of her marriage.

Colour My World (Chicago, 1970) reflects the buoyant rainbow color spectrum that was ubiquitous during this era. Recently published works on color theory by Johannes Itten and Josef Albers provided a cornerstone of the new art education. For Linda Mendelson, color, typography, and text became inseparable. She adapted Albers’s ideas relating to after-images in Big Red, and linked color progression with lines from a poem titled Coat by William Butler Yeats from which she drew inspiration. Other artists such as Tim Harding created an effect similar to impressionist brush strokes by slashing and fraying dyed fabrics, as seen in his colorful coat Garden: Field of Flowers, 1991.

The final section Everybody’s Talkin’ (Harry Nilsson, 1969) explores the use of text in Art to Wear. JoEllen Trilling engages in visual word play using common prepositions on a jacket, while Jean Cacicedo channels her grief over her father’s death using words taken from the bible that celebrated his life in My Father’s House, 1994.

Dilys Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costumes and Textiles, who organized the exhibition, said: “We are looking back at this period with a fresh lens through which to consider a uniquely American art form that continues to have a worldwide influence. With roots and connections in fine arts, fiber art, craft, performance and fashion, there are so many important artists to appreciate. For this reason I am delighted by the opportunity to cast a light on such extraordinary talents, including so many adventurous women who deserve much greater recognition.”

Publication
Off the Wall: American Art to Wear is accompanied by a new publication of the same name co-published the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University Press, co-authored by exhibition curators Dilys E. Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costumes and Textiles at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and independent textile scholar and curator Mary Schoeser, with a contribution written by Julie Schafler Dale. The volume provides the social, political, and artistic context for Art to Wear. ISBN 9780876332917.

Curators
Dilys Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costume and Textiles and Mary Schoeser, Independent Textile Historian and Curator

Support
This exhibition has been made possible by Julie Schafler Dale, PNC, The Coby Foundation, the Arlin and Neysa Adams Endowment Fund, the Center for American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and other generous donors. Credits as of July 8, 2019.

Social Media @philamuseum

Bear Walker × 360 Magazine

Recently, we had Bear Walker design a custom longboard for us! We are very honored to show our viewers this amazing piece and thankful he has spent his time designing something so unique! Make sure to check out his website and Instagram for more of his amazing work!

About Bear Walker

Walker is a designer, maker, and a seeker of adventure. He has always had a passion for art and technology growing up. Walker attended Clemson University studying graphic design and product development, where in his senior year he was tasked with designing a skateboard with various printing techniques. Designing around 40 pieces was the start to his amazing career. He has also worked as a book designer for Amazon, a prop fabricator for an events company, and a sign maker. Now he uses his skills and craftsmanship to produce the highest quality and one-of-a-kind skateboards for people.