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Mad About Jewelry

THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN’S ANNUAL EXHIBITION AND SALE OF CONTEMPORARY JEWELRY RETURNS WITH 55 ARTISTS FROM 18 COUNTRIES

LOOT: MAD ABOUT JEWELRY

April 8 – April 13, 2019

Opening Benefit: April 8

Featuring the announcement of the LOOT Acquisition Prize and the presentation of LOOT Awards honoring Adria de Haume and Josie Natori

The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) presents the nineteenth edition of LOOT: MAD About Jewelry, its annual exhibition and sale of one-of-a-kind contemporary jewelry. Open to the public April 9 through April 13, following the Opening Benefit on April 8, LOOT 2019 showcases the work of fifty-five emerging and acclaimed international jewelry artists and designers, most of whom have never been shown in New York. The event provides the rare opportunity for collectors and jewelry enthusiasts to meet and acquire pieces from some of the most innovative creators in the field.

“The jewelry content of LOOT 2019 is particularly noteworthy in two specific areas,” said LOOT Curator Bryna Pomp. “Firstly, this year’s exhibition presents a great number of outstanding young makers who are already creating groundbreaking work. Secondly, it features a larger presence of jewelry in precious metals, particularly in silver and in gold, often with semi precious and precious stones, that is exceptionally original in design.”

MAD is the only museum in the United States with a gallery dedicated to the display of both special jewelry exhibitions and its permanent collection of contemporary and modern studio and art jewelry. LOOT extends MAD’s commitment to presenting jewelry as an art form, and provides vital support for Museum exhibitions and programs.

“LOOT reflects the core of MAD’s mission to celebrate the creative process and connect audiences to contemporary art and design,” said Marsy Mittlemann, LOOT 2019 Co-Chair. “It presents an extraordinary opportunity for artists and viewers to interact with one another and engage in conversations around the work. I am honored to participate in an event that provides a platform for international talent while supporting MAD’s exciting upcoming initiatives.”

“LOOT is always exceptionally curated, and 2019 promises to be the best edition to date,” said LOOT 2019 Co-Chair Joan Hornig. “No other exhibition in the world brings viewers into contact with the diversity of design and designers showcased each spring at MAD. It is the perfect venue for both serious and first-time collectors to engage with global talent and purchase unique pieces of wearable art at every price point.”

LOOT 2019 features fifty-five artists from eighteen countries and territories: Austria (1), Belgium (1), Chile (2), Finland (1), France (2), Germany (6), Italy (2), Korea (5), Poland (1), Portugal (2), Spain (5), Sweden (1), Taiwan (1), Thailand (1), Turkey (3), the United Kingdom (14), the United States (6), and the US Virgin Islands (1). In addition to a diverse range of artistic practices, the jewelry on display encompasses a wide array of materials, from traditional metals to more unconventional media like leather, glass, porcelain, paper, silicone, resin, textiles, wood, horsehair, recycled skateboards, and ultraviolet-reactive nylon.

ARTIST HIGHLIGHTS

The jewelry artists and designers featured in LOOT 2019 include the following:

  • Italian designer Selvaggia Armani designs and produces textiles, including necklaces and brooches, for home and casual wear. On site at LOOT, she will create a new collection of jewelry made of hand-painted leather, building on her practice of “live” painting and customized bracelets.
  • Japan-born and Massachusetts-based artist Mariko Kusumoto prevails upon fabric to construct forms of elegant simplicity and evocative imagery. Using a proprietary heat- setting technique, she gives the fabric a new identity through reshaping it into three- dimensional forms. Her designs are incorporated into jewelry and sculptural pieces, as well as in collaborations with fashion designers; in January, her work appeared on the Jean-Paul Gaultier catwalk at Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2019.
  • Taiwanese jewelry artist Heng Lee juxtaposes traditional craft technique and cutting- edge technology to explore the relationship between nature and Internet culture. Using downloaded images, laser-cut metal, and hand embroidery, he creates visually striking pieces that are both digital and tactile. In a time when much of our information comes from social media, his work interrogates the divide between experience and technology, and encourages full awareness of the current moment.
  • Scotland-based artist Wanshu Li is largely inspired by the brilliant colors and sensuous movements of sea creatures like jellyfish and sea anemones. With her jewelry, she aims to create a multisensory wearing experience that involves visual enjoyment, tactility, and sound. Li’s fascination with dance culture, laser light shows, and stage performances inspired her to add a further visual dimension to her practice: she experiments with ultraviolet-reactive nylon and fluorescent paints, which combine to produce a remarkable intensity of color when the jewelry is illuminated with UV light.
  • Houston-based designer Mariquita Masterson creates handmade glass pieces that are vivid, unique, and energetic, and that unite the everyday with the exceptional. Masterson uses both recycled glass and glass from companies that produce a variety of colors and textures, and on occasion creates stunning pieces out of the fragments of broken antique vases. Most recently, Masterson has gained attention for the debut of one of her necklaces worn by Speaker of the US House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi during the President’s State of the Union address in February.

This year, LOOT will showcase the work of four 2018 graduates of La Escuela de Arte 3, in Madrid, Spain: Patricia Álvarez, Cristina Armesilla, Sonia Birndt Carrascosa, and Bárbara García. The jewelry of these emerging creators exhibits fresh expressions of color and form, and takes inspiration from music, technology, contradiction, and the city they call home.

In its first year, the LOOT Advisory Committee assists LOOT Curator Bryna Pomp with the selection of artists and designers. The LOOT Advisory Committee for 2019 includes Susan Ach, Michele Cohen, Marsy Mittlemann, and Barbara Waldman.

LOOT ACQUISITION PRIZE

Awarded annually by a jury, the LOOT Acquisition Prize recognizes a LOOT jewelry artist or designer whose work reflects maturity in artistry and concept, exhibits both a superior and an experimental understanding of materials and form, and demonstrates expertise in technique and execution. MAD’s permanent collection includes nearly one thousand pieces of jewelry, spanning the mid-twentieth century to the present day. The LOOT Acquisition Prize formalizes the Museum’s goal of enhancing its collection by acquiring jewelry from artists who have made significant contributions to the field and whose work provides historical context for MAD’s mid- to late-twentieth-century pieces, as well as from emerging artists who are an important force in the contemporary art jewelry scene.

The 2019 jury is chaired by Barbara Paris Gifford and Elissa Auther together with LOOT Co- Chairs Joan Hornig and Marsy Mittlemann, LOOT Curator Bryna Pomp, and Board Chair Michele Cohen. The 2019 LOOT Acquisition Prize will be awarded on April 8 during the Opening Benefit dinner.

In 2018, the prize was jointly awarded to Isabelle Molénat and Sarran Youkongdee. Past LOOT artists who have had works acquired by the Museum include the well-established art jeweler Iris Nieuwenburg and the emerging jewelry artist Casey Sobel. Alena Willroth, who was awarded the inaugural LOOT Acquisition Prize in 2016, will be a returning artist this year.

OPENING BENEFIT AND LOOT AWARD

The LOOT 2019 Opening Benefit takes place on Monday, April 8, beginning with a cocktail hour and reception at 4:30 pm. The evening’s activities include first access to the LOOT exhibition and sale—an exclusive opportunity to meet this year’s artists and acquire their designs—as well as a dinner honoring the recipients of the LOOT Award.

The LOOT Award recognizes luminaries in the field of jewelry, including artists, collectors, and designers. This year’s honorees are jewelry designer and philanthropist Adria de Haume and jewelry and fashion designer Josie Natori. Past recipients include fashion icon Iris Apfel (2013), collector Barbara Berger (2013), jewelry designer Joan Hornig (2016), fashion designer Kay Unger (2016), and artists Joyce J. Scott (2014) and Axel Russmeyer (2012).

The LOOT 2019 Opening Benefit Host Committee comprises Susan Ach, Iris Apfel, Davina Benshetrit, Caroline Blackman, Noreen Buckfire, Marian C. Burke, Kathy Chazen, Michele Cohen, Paolo Costagli, Stacy Creamer, Emily Cutler, Marcia Docter, Patti Dweck, Beth Farber, Sandy Grotta, Joon Han, Jan Huling, Barbara Jacobs, Ann Kaplan, Wendy Tarlow Kaplan, Jane Koryn, Laura Kruger, Luisa LaViola, Bonnie Levine, Pam Levine, Tina Livanos, Jackie Martin, Stacey Mayrock, Ella McHugh, Robert Lee Morris, Edie Nadler, Michelle Perr, Linda Plattus, Andi Potamkin, Barbara Regna, Heidi Rigney, Deborah Roberts, Lela Rose, Jill Ryan, Bette Saltzman, Gail Shields-Miller, Angela Sun, Ted Taylor, Barbara Tober, Isabel and Ruben Toledo, Kay Unger, Barbara Waldman, Janet Winter, Marcia Celis Wirth, Pamela Workman, Jan Wysocki, and Lynn Yaeger.

To purchase tickets to the LOOT 2019 Opening Benefit, to be held on Monday, April 8, visit thestore.madmuseum.org/collections/loot-2019, or contact Rebekka Grossman at 212.299.7712 or rebekka.grossman@madmuseum.org.

PUBLIC EXHIBITION AND SALE HOURS

Tuesday, April 9: 10am to 6pm

Wednesday, April 10: 10am to 6pm

Thursday, April 11: 10am to 6pm

Friday, April 12: 10am to 6pm

Saturday, April 13: 10am to 6pm

Entrance to LOOT is included in the price of Museum admission: $16 general; $14 for seniors; $12 for students; free for MAD members and children under 18 years of age. To purchase tickets online, visit madmuseum.org/visit.

ABOUT CORPORATE SPONSOR: PAOLO COSTAGLI

Paolo Costagli New York returns as corporate sponsor of LOOT. The fine jewelry brand recognized for its sophisticated, modern, and distinctly bold designs, will debut Onde, its new collection of 18kt gold and diamond jewelry at LOOT 2019. The Onde collection, inspired by the waves of the Venetian Lagoon, introduces a variety of rings, earrings, bracelets, and necklaces. Featuring Paolo Costagli’s signature bold geometrics with a touch of fluidity, the collection presents effortlessly chic precious jewelry fit for all occasions, from everyday wear to a formal soirée.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN

The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) champions contemporary makers across creative fields and presents the work of artists, designers, and artisans who apply the highest level of ingenuity and skill. Since the Museum’s founding in 1956 by philanthropist and visionary Aileen Osborn Webb, MAD has celebrated all facets of making and the creative processes by which materials are transformed, from traditional techniques to cutting-edge technologies. Today, the Museum’s curatorial program builds upon a rich history of exhibitions that emphasize a cross-disciplinary approach to art and design, and reveals the workmanship behind the objects and environments that shape our everyday lives. MAD provides an international platform for practitioners who are influencing the direction of cultural production and driving twenty-first-century innovation, and fosters a participatory setting for visitors to have direct encounters with skilled making and compelling works of art and design. For more information, visit their website.

MAD MUSEUM

The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) presents an annual exhibition and sale of one-of-a-kind artisan jewelry called LOOT: MAD About Jewelry. Returning this spring (April 9 – 13), it will feature work from 55 artists from 18 countries (South Korea, UK, Finland, Chile, Scotland, Spain, France, Italy to name a few). These hand-picked artists specialize in different techniques and use unique materials such as glass, wood, metal, embroidery, horse hair and latex. Open to the public during museum hours – April 9th – 13th from 10am – 6pm.

For more information visit their site here.

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

Comparing, Contrasting, Cutting, GUINNESS

The Guinness Brewery at St. James’s Gate in Dublin has been brewing beer since its founder, Arthur Guinness, signed his now famous 9,000-year lease on the property on December 31st 1759. The brewery began its life producing ales for Dublin City, it would soon embark on a journey brewing new styles of beer originating in London known as Porter’s and Stout’s. This journey would lead the then small family brewery located on the outskirts of Dublin City to become the largest Stout brewery in the world. Along the 258-year journey that Guinness has undertaken it has been frequently enjoyed at the table alongside a well paired dish.

 

The secret of a good pairing lies in the three C’s, Comparing, Contrasting and Cutting.

 

We will now use Guinness Draught Stout as an example of how to Compare and Contrast the same beer with two different dishes, and examine how the presence of one can interact with the flavor of the other.

 

When Comparing we are required to find foods with similar flavor and intensity to that of the beer. These flavors will then compliment and resonate with each other.

 

For our first pairing, we use Guinness Draught Stout, found in new throw-back cans featuring the Kinkajou, a marketing creation from the 1930’s, 40’s and 50’s by legendary artist John Gilory. Distinctively dark with a rich creamy head, coffee and malty, and the perfect balance of bitter, sweet and roast characters. These flavors are the product of using roasted barley in our brewing and also give Guinness Draught Stout it’s iconic ruby red color. When the barley is roasted at 466 degrees Fahrenheit for 2 and 1Ž2 hours it undergoes a change called the Maillard reaction, a chemical reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars that also gives browned food its distinctive flavor. The flavors from the roasted barley used in Guinness Draught Stout balance wonderfully with the similar rich roasted flavors of an Applewood Smoked Bacon Sandwich with each sip of stout harmonizing with every bite of sandwich until both glass and plate are empty.

 

GUINNESS DRAUGHT & APPLEWOOD SMOKED BACON SANDWICH

 

After looking at Comparing let us now review Contrasting Guinness Draught Stout with a different dish. As we know Stout tastes of coffee and bitter flavors, let us use those to contrast against and accentuate the sweet and creamy deliciousness of a warm Apple and Pear Tart nestled under a generous scoop of Vanilla Gelato. This pairing is very similar to having your cup of coffee with a sweet pastry or confection.

 

GUINNESS DRAUGHT & APPLE AND PEAR TART

 

Finally let’s discuss Cutting. We will utilize Guinness Blonde American Lager as our example for Cutting. Guinness Blonde American Lager, light and hoppy with floral and citrus notes and a long malt biscuit finish. This crisp and refreshing lager has a lively mouthfeel provided by its ample carbonation, this carbonation is ideal for “Cutting” through creamy and juicy dishes and cleansing the palate after each bite. While enjoying a burger at a BBQ or creamy ham and cheese croquettes using this pairing technique, Cutting scrubs the palate and resets your taste buds after each sip.

 

BLONDE AMERICAN LAGER & HAM & CHEDDAR CHEESE CROQUETTES

 

We hope you enjoy using the 3 C’s for your future beer and food pairing adventures! Happy St. Patrick’s Day from the Brewer’s at Guinness and always remember to Drink Responsibly.

 

Eoghain Clavin, Guinness Brewery Ambassador, Pacific Region U.S.