Posts tagged with "Foundation"

A Voice for the Forgotten Minority

If foundations fall short on equality for people with disabilities, Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi puts them on the spot.
By Alex Daniels

A microphone in Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi’s hands is a powerful weapon. At venues across the country, Mizrahi has used her strong, clear voice to ask foundation leaders variations of one simple question: Why aren’t people with disabilities included?

As large foundations have placed more muscle behind programs that promote equity in terms of race, wealth, gender identity, and sexual orientation, Mizrahi believes people with disabilities have been overlooked.

During question-and-answer sessions at major foundation gatherings, she is the first with her hand up, ready to put foundation leaders on the spot. Why isn’t a foundation’s website accessible to the blind? she’ll ask. Or why isn’t data on disabled voters included on a conference speaker’s chart of voting patterns among residents of rural areas, African-Americans, and young people?

The reason for the neglect, she says, is that disability groups have too often come to foundations looking for charity. That strategy is rooted in the idea that donors should take pity on people who are blind, have dwarfism, or are intellectually challenged, she says, rather than treating discrimination against them as a violation of their civil rights.

“The overall messages of the disability community caused us more harm than good,” she says. “The more they were repeated, the more harm was done.”

Through RespectAbility, an organization she co-founded five years ago, and through her own philanthropy, Mizrahi has pushed to eliminate stigmatization and to reduce barriers to employment for people with disabilities.

Sometimes her approach is direct, such as when she called Darren Walker, president of the Ford Foundation, a “hypocrite” in an email for not including disabilities in the grant maker’s shift to focus entirely on equity. After that, and with the input of lots of others in addition to Mizrahi, Walker issued a mea culpa and announced that Ford would work to address inequalities based on disability throughout all of its programs. Mizrahi now calls Ford’s response the “gold standard.”

Donn Weinberg, executive vice president of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation and co-founder of RespectAbility, said Mizrahi is “fearless” in asking difficult questions of foundation honchos. When she’s able to get face-to-face with philanthropy executives at conferences, she seizes the opportunity to educate them about disability issues.

Private Consultations

Some nonprofit leaders grumble privately that Mizrahi sometimes claims credit for efforts that were already underway. And sometimes her questions come in the form of short lectures.

At a Philanthropy Roundtable conference in 2017, the group’s staff asked Weinberg, who also serves as Philanthropy Roundtable’s chairman, if he could persuade Mizrahi to tone down her rhetoric and get to the point. “She clearly wants people to hear a bit of commentary before the question,” he says. “She’s planting seeds of thought and bringing to people’s consciousness an issue they often don’t think about.”

But Mizrahi doesn’t see herself as a provocateur or a grandstander. She consults directly with nonprofit leaders to make sure their websites, grant applications, and program strategies benefit and are accessible to people with disabilities.

She’s created a set of guidelines and tools for organizations that want to gauge whether they are being inclusive. And she dispatches young professionals and students working as RespectAbility fellows to interview foundation employees about how they communicate with, employ, and benefit the disabled population.

“We try to call people aside and not call them out,” she insists, saying most of her work is done in private consultations with foundation leaders, not in the public spotlight. “I like to see myself as a partner, a facilitator, and a resource.”

Aaron Dorfman knows from experience.

Mizrahi said her annual-dues statement from Dorfman’s group, the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy, sold the organization as a social-justice champion — but something was missing.

“They were very proud to send me a 12-page, single-spaced memo on diversity, equity, and inclusion,” she says. “The word ‘disability’ wasn’t in it.”

The two met for coffee to discuss the matter. Afterward, as the committee was preparing to release a guide for foundations interested in social justice, Dorfman asked Mizrahi to analyze a draft to make sure it adequately covered disability.

Dorfman said he welcomed the challenge. By putting foundation leaders on the spot at conferences, Mizrahi is helping philanthropy see its shortcomings and grow.

“There’s a certain amount of discomfort when you get called out, even if you get called out rightfully,” he says. “This culture of politeness doesn’t serve marginalized communities well. It’s all right to make someone feel uncomfortable in pursuit of full inclusion.”

Diversity Includes Disabled People

Some foundations recognize they need help. A survey of 205 foundation chief executives conducted by the Center for Effective Philanthropy found that most leaders thought their organization was staffed by people with a diversity of backgrounds and served a diverse set of beneficiaries in terms of race, gender, and sexual orientation. But over half said they fell short when it came to people with a disability.

The reason, according to Judy Belk, president of the California Wellness Foundation, is many people think the Americans With Disabilities Act, passed in 1990, cured injustices faced by disabled people.

The existence of handicapped parking places and curb cuts on street corners, Belk says, doesn’t mean all of the challenges have been addressed. Similarly, just because philanthropies have crafted strategies designed to ameliorate inequities doesn’t mean they’ve faithfully put them into practice.

For Belk, concentrating on disabilities could be a good way to achieve progress in some of the foundation’s existing programs, including efforts to improve oral health for low-income adults, prevent HIV/AIDS among women of color, and help women of color adjust to society after being incarcerated. All of the groups that stand to benefit from that work, Belk says, include a large proportion of people with disabilities.

To start, the California Wellness Foundation had RespectAbility audit its website. Mizrahi’s staff found that the grant maker’s web presence wasn’t an inviting place for everyone. Belk ordered a redo to make sure the site complied with content-accessibility guidelines.

“Foundations have diversity, equity, and inclusion statements up the wazoo,” she says. “They can show you a statement and say they’re committed. I’d like to push ourselves and hold ourselves accountable.”

Easy Improvements

Foundations have largely failed to incorporate disability into the programs they run and the data they collect, Mizrahi says. And she thinks nonprofits in general have fallen behind businesses and government agencies in accommodating people with disabilities. Though many organizations would like to make progress, they often fear it will cost a lot.

Many fixes aren’t expensive but require presence of mind. For instance, Mizrahi says, it’s free and easy to make Twitter and Facebook feeds accessible and put captions on YouTube videos. And avoiding meetings in places like church basements that aren’t accessible for people in wheelchairs requires the presence of mind to schedule gatherings elsewhere.

Mizrahi says she’d rather educate than scold, and help people understand that people with disabilities are productive team members.

“I don’t view every organization equally,” she said. “The Americans With Disabilities Act treats organizations differently based on size and budget, and so do I. If it’s a small, fragile organization with nobody on staff, I have very few expectations they’ll all of a sudden have a personal-care assistant for someone who is a quadriplegic and on oxygen in order to participate in their program.”

Nonprofits lack clear guidelines on the steps they should take to make their organizations more accessible, according to Michael Thatcher, president of Charity Navigator. Over the past year, he has been in discussions with Mizrahi about how to encourage charities to get started.

Master Problem-Solvers

The first step, Mizrahi says, is to help organizations understand what kind of contributions people with disabilities can make.

At a Capitol Hill conference that RespectAbility held in July, Vincenzo Piscopo, the director of community and stakeholder relations for the Coca-Cola Company, told the 200 attendees that people with disabilities are often accustomed to overcoming obstacles and are master problem- solvers. It’s incumbent on people with disabilities in the work force to serve as ambassadors, to help employers understand what they bring to the table.

“When companies have people with disabilities, they’re providing value to their company,” he told the gathered crowd. “They’re not doing charity.”

Stephanie Farfan is one of those ambassadors. Farfan, a little person who calls herself a “master Googler,” was looking for internships specially geared toward disability issues and found RespectAbility online. There weren’t a lot of other opportunities like it.

RespectAbility’s fellows program, which is supported by the Stanford and Joan Alexander and Ford foundations, allows students and young professionals to work in public policy and communications roles and in the organization’s foundation practice.

Before she came to Washington to attend graduate school in international studies at American University, Farfan worked in Florida with Little People of America. A fluent Spanish speaker, her volunteer work with Little People of America often involved talking with Hispanic parents of children with dwarfism.

Coming to RespectAbility, Farfan, who wants to pursue a career at the State Department, has spent much of her time delving into state laws and regulations on disability issues.

“Coming over to the policy side has given me a new perspective,” she says. “It’s rounded out my skill set.”

‘One Toe in the Water’

Mizrahi’s behind-the-scenes work has resulted in changes in foundation practices. In addition to the National Committee on Responsive Philanthropy and the Belk Foundation, she shared — on the condition that they not be named — emails from several grant makers showing they had incorporated RespectAbility’s suggestions into their website design and broader communication strategy.

While she’d like to keep those successes private, she’s not afraid of publicly criticizing foundations she thinks are lagging behind.

She slammed the Lumina Foundation for not specifically incorporating people with disabilities in its work-force development grants. She said the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation provided little money to directly support disabilities and did not collect or disseminate data on the progress of students with disabilities in its domestic education work.

“I am deeply disturbed that Lumina and Gates aren’t doing dramatically more,” she says. “They are both sort of one toe in the water.”

In response, Lumina’s director of strategic communications, Kevin Corcoran, said that while there is “laudable” work being done to ensure people with disabilities succeed after high school, the foundation’s focus was on educational outcomes for students of color. The Gates Foundation said it has been making changes to address the issue, but it did not single out any one person who pushed for the revisions.

In October 2017, Gates “refreshed” its approach to education grant making. Since then, the foundation has said it has begun to disaggregate the data it collects so it can track students with disabilities, and it has begun to support programs to accommodate disabled charter-school students.

“We have already begun to fund research to help us understand how the foundation could best support success, engagement, and transitions for students with disabilities, and we plan to make the results of this research publicly available, via our grantees,” the foundation said in a statement.

An Advantage From Dyslexia

Activists have pushed foundations to recognize disabilities in the broader civil-rights context for decades. In the 1980s, Donors Forum, a collective of Illinois grant makers now known as Forefront, had a board meeting to discuss a survey on diversity it was going to send out to members.

Marca Bristo, who was a board member at the time, said there were no questions about disabilities. “They just plain forgot about it,” says Bristo, who is president of Access Living, a Chicago disability and housing advocate.

More recently, Bristo has noticed a desire among large foundations to learn more. Before the MacArthur Foundation awarded $100 million to Sesame Street Workshop and the International Rescue Committee last year as part of its 100&Change challenge, Bristo sat down with the foundation’s president Julia Stasch to figure out how to incorporate inclusion of people with disabilities into the award.

With Susan Sygall, a former MacArthur fellow and CEO of Mobility International, Bristo reviewed the contest’s eight semifinalists and developed a disability checklist that the applicants could use to assess their pitches.

“Leaders from the disability-rights movement have been working on these issues for years,” she wrote in an email to the Chronicle. “The work RespectAbility has focused on is critically important but not new. No one organization can do this transformational work alone. The intransigence of stigma, prejudice, and exclusion requires a sustained and collaborative effort by all of us.”

Before the winners were named, Mizrahi was instrumental in “amplifying” the work to include people with disabilities, according to Cecilia Conrad, who leads MacArthur’s 100&Change program. Mizrahi consulted with the foundation about what constitutes full inclusion and wrote opinion pieces that highlighted the role of inclusion in the award.

For Mizrahi, becoming an effective communicator didn’t come naturally. As someone with dyslexia, she didn’t begin reading until she was 12 and didn’t achieve functional literacy until two years later. After an early growth spurt, she reached her full, above average, adult height at a very early age. She seemed all grown up, but she was having a difficult time. Adults around her expressed their disappointment in her academic progress, calling her “lazy.”

Mizrahi responded to the challenge through intensive work on reading. She expertly honed her listening and speaking skills. Now, she says, when she enters any conversation or debate, her disability has given her a huge advantage.

“Having a disability means there’s something you can’t do in your everyday living. But there’s nothing in the world that says you can’t be the best in the world at something else.”

Donna Kalajian Lagani Joins Hearst Foundations

Hearst today announced that Donna Kalajian Lagani will join the Hearst Foundations after nearly 25 years at Hearst Magazines. Kalajian Lagani had been senior vice president and group publishing director of Hearst Magazines Young Women’s Group, encompassing CosmopolitanSeventeen and Women’s Health. The announcement was made by Hearst President and CEO Steven R. Swartz. Kalajian Lagani assumes her new role February 4. Her replacement at Hearst Magazines will be named shortly.

“Donna has done an outstanding job leading our flagship magazine brand for more than two decades, and I am thrilled that she has chosen to take the next step in her career journey at the Hearst Foundations,” Swartz said.

The Hearst Foundations are national philanthropic resources for organizations working in the fields of culture, education, health and social services. The Foundations identify and fund outstanding nonprofits to ensure that people of all backgrounds in the United States have the opportunity to build healthy, productive and inspiring lives. Created by William Randolph Hearst, the Foundations are independent, private philanthropies operating separately from Hearst. Since 1945, the Foundations have made over 20,000 grants totaling more than $1.1 billion. 

“Philanthropy is an important part of my life, and this is something I’ve always wanted to do,” Kalajian Lagani said. “I’ve had the absolute best job on the planet for more than two decades, overseeing Cosmopolitan, the most powerful young women’s media brand in the world, and more recently, adding SeventeenWomen’s Health and brand licensing to my purview. Now, after a ‘fun and fearless’ career generating revenue and profits, I feel truly blessed to work with the Foundations and its directors, Paul ‘Dino’ Dinovitz and George Irish. The Foundations’ grants profoundly change people’s lives, and I’m honored to join them to uphold the legacy of William Randolph Hearst and his philanthropic efforts.”   

In a joint statement, Dinovitz and Irish said, “We have known for some time of Donna’s interest in philanthropy and impacting lives for the better, and we’re pleased that she will be joining us, bringing her philanthropic interest and executive talent to the Foundations.”

Kalajian Lagani joined Hearst Magazines in 1995 as publisher of Cosmopolitan and was named publishing director in 1999. She added oversight of Seventeen in 2014 and of Women’s Health in 2018, following Hearst’s acquisition of Rodale. During her career at Cosmopolitan, Kalajian Lagani introduced groundbreaking initiatives, most recently through mobile and artificial intelligence technology. She developed and immortalized the “fun fearless female” mantra used by Cosmopolitan editions worldwide. During her tenure, she helped launch CosmoGIRL! and Cosmo for Latinas, and was a strong force in bringing Cosmopolitan to new platforms, including Snapchat and Sirius XM Radio. 

Kalajian Lagani conceived and produced a Cosmopolitan “takeover” of Times Square on New Year’s Eve in 2015 to celebrate the brand’s 50 birthday and developed the “Fun Fearless Life” conference in New York City to empower young women. She initiated a multi-year brand partnership with the USO and received the organization’s Distinguished Service Award in 2010. Kalajian Lagani also launched the $100,000 Cosmopolitan “Practice Safe Sun” research grant and was honored as a cosmetic industry leader at the prestigious DreamBall in 2005 for her support of the “Look Good Feel Better” program and the American Cancer Society.

Kalajian Lagani sits on the Board of Directors of Circle of Generosity and the Fragrance Foundation. 

LOEWE × ‘CHANCE ENCOUNTERS IV’ EXHIBITION

LOEWE Foundation’s Chance Encounters IV exhibition opening took place last night with works by Anne Low, Andrea Büttner, and Ian Godfrey on display at the LOEWE store in the Miami Design District. Artist Anne Low joined LOEWE Creative Director Jonathan Anderson to celebrate the fourth series; guests in attendance included Boris Izaguirre, Caroline Daur, Casey Spooner, Craig Robins, Chloe Wise, Danié Gómez-Ortigoza, Gracie Mansion, Nicole Warne, Pari Ehsan, and Stefano Tonchi.

 

The works will be exhibited from December 4th – January 31st at the LOEWE Miami Design District store.

Petersen Automotive Museum Opens New “Legends of Los Angeles” Exhibit

On November 10, 2018, the Petersen Automotive Museum opened its latest exhibit, “Legends of Los Angeles: Southern California Race Cars and Their Builders,” in the Charles Nearburg Family Gallery presented by Lucas Oil. The display features 12 Los Angeles-built race cars powered by engineering masterminds such as Ed “The Old Master” Pink and Fred Offenhauser and piloted by legends such as Don “The Snake” Prudhomme, Parnelli Jones, Bill Stroppe and Dan Gurney.

“Legends of LA” is highlighted by a stunning180-degree panoramic video, which surrounds the collection of race cars and provides an immersive way to experience the fastest race cars ever built in Los Angeles as they are raced on the region’s famed tracks. Featuring vehicles from every major racing type including midgets, sprint cars, dragsters, off-road cars, IndyCars, land-speed cars and road-racing cars, the panoramic video works alongside the display to take viewers on a visual journey down historic tracks such as El Mirage, Willow Springs International Raceway and Perris Auto Speedway.

Key vehicles on display include a 1963 Ol’Yaller Mark IX, which was one of the last race cars designed and built by Southern California hot rod legend Max Balchowsky; a 1964 Shelby Cobra 289 FIA, one of five FIA-spec factory team cars that competed in the 1964 World Championship and was raced by Dan Gurney in the Targa Florio; a 1967 Long 
“Shelby Super Snake” with an Ed Pink racing engine, which made history when driver Done Prudhomme accomplished four quarter-mile runs in the six-second range at the 1967 NHRA Spring Nationals; and Big Oly, a 1970 Ford Bronco which was raced to a back-to-back victories at the Baja 1000 in 1971 and 1972 by the legendary off-roading team of Parnelli Jones and Bill Stroppe.

“From the early years of auto racing to today, Los Angeles has played a key role in the development and growth of motorsports in North America,” said Executive Director Terry L. Karges. “Our new exhibit honors the region’s rich history through some of the finest examples of race car engineering and design, telling a comprehensive story about the legends that helped establish Los Angeles as the diverse racing destination that is today.”

Preceding the public opening, the Petersen hosted a formal cocktail reception and media preview on Thursday, November 8, 2018. The evening paid homage to LA-based racing icon and race car constructor Parnelli Jones, a motorsports legend known for his victories in nearly every major auto racing event in the United States. Jones, whose voice is featured in the gallery video was praised on stage while guests bid on his signed racing memorabilia during a silent auction.

“Legends of Los Angeles” will run through December 1, 2019. To learn more about the new exhibit or the Peterson Automotive Museum, please click here!

The Petersen Automotive Museum Foundation is a non-profit 501(c)(3) charity. The Museum is located at 6060 Wilshire Boulevard (at Fairfax) in Los Angeles, California, 90036. Admission prices are $16 for general admission adults, $13 for seniors and students with ID, $8 for children ages 3 to 12. Active military with ID, personal care attendants and children under three are admitted free. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For general information, call 323-930-CARS or visit here!

CASH MONEY RECORDS x TURKEY GIVEAWAY

Continuing a 22-year holiday tradition, Cash Money Records will host its annual turkey giveaway in New Orleans, LA on Tuesday, November 20th. Once again, label Co-Founders and brothers Ronald “Slim” Williams and Bryan “Birdman” Williams return to their hometown in order to give back, uplift, and spread hope, spirit, and cheer for the holidays. Full details can be found below.

For the Williams Brothers, this charity stands out as a cornerstone of the label’s core mission and values. Given their lifelong commitment to philanthropy, they co-founded 501(c)(3) organization The Johnny and Gladys Williams Foundation—named after their parents. Among many initiatives, the Foundation presents the turkey giveaway, providing families throughout the community with a bountiful Thanksgiving meal every year. As a result of their work, the company remains a paragon in the community.

With the William Brothers on-site, this will be the fifth year that Cash Money hosts the event at New Home Full Gospel Ministries (1605 Carondelet Street; New Orleans, LA 70130) from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Walmart generously donates the turkeys, and Rouses provides the sides and fixings. Birdman’s newest innovation Stunna Brand, Inc. comes aboard as a sponsor for the first time. Radio station Q93 kicks out the jams all day, and NOLA Games On Wheels engages families with entertainment and video games.

Back for the fifth time, the turkey giveaway includes full-service health screenings by Ochsner Health Systems. Services span testing for glucose, cholesterol, and blood pressure, dental care, eye exams, quick look EKG’s, stroke assessment, and more. Attendees may receive counseling and information on heart healthy diet, kidney disease, pre-natal care, and diabetes as well as smoking cessation programs and healthy recipe books.

Also, for the fifth year, Dr. David Liang [Director, Stanford Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Disease] and his staff administer Aortic Disease and Marfan Syndrome heart screenings.

The Turkey Giveaway is something we’ve been doing since the beginning of Cash Money,” states Ronald ‘Slim’ Williams. “The moment we made it, we knew we had to lift up our hometown. It was always a part of the label’s vision and brand from day one. Over the years, it’s become something the community can rely on and trust. To me, that’s our greatest accomplishment. We’ve received so many blessings, we want to share those with the city we love and call home.”

Birdman continues, “You could take away the success, the money, and everything. It doesn’t matter. What matters most is the people who were with you since day one: your neighborhood, your friends, and your family. We’ve never forgotten how New Orleans put us first. The Turkey Giveaway is a way to say ‘Thank you’ to everybody we love. Out of everything, it’s what we want people to associate Cash Money with. This defines our legacy.”

Chris Tucker to Host EBONY Power 100 Gala

EBONY Magazine announces the host for its annual EBONY Power 100 Gala and this year’s special award recipients.

Acclaimed actor and comedian Chris Tucker will steer the star-studded event.

Distinguished industry leaders to be recognized with the EBONY Icon Award and Inaugural Chairman’s Award

Following the recent unveiling of its prestigious annual EBONY Power 100 List in celebration those whose work and heroism continue to inspire and influence society, EBONY magazine has announced the host for this year’s highly anticipated EBONY Power 100 Gala, presented by Nationwide, taking place in Los Angeles at the Beverly Hilton on Nov. 30.

EBONY is also pleased to announce the recipients of this year’s coveted special awards which will be presented during Hollywood’s star-studded spectacle.

Helming the celebration of the 2018 EBONY Power 100 list honoring crusaders, innovators, disruptors, business titans, entrepreneurs and MVPs who are making a difference in the community at the EBONY Power 100 Gala is international award-winning actor Chris Tucker. Once a frequent stand-up performer on Def Comedy Jam in the 1990s, Tucker is best known today for playing Det. James Carter in the Rush Hour film series. Chris is currently returning to the stage on his stand-up comedy tour that has received rave reviews all over the world, while spending much of his spare time traveling and working with his foundation.

EBONY Media Operations CEO Michael Gibson will present the inaugural Chairman’s Award to former BET Chairman and CEO Debra Lee. The trailblazing business dynamo joined BET as executive vice president and general counsel in 1986, was promoted to president and COO of the network that reaches approximately 78 million homes in March 1996 and to chairman and CEO in 2005. She guided much of the 38-year-old network’s growth beyond music and into entertainment, news and public affairs programming, including original movies, late-night talk shows and concert specials, with successes such as bringing to cable The Game in 2014 and the miniseries. The New Edition Story in 2017, the launch of BET.com and the acquisition of the television rights to Black Girls Rock!

This year’s prestigious EBONY Icon Award will be presented to Motown Records. There simply isn’t a name in music more synonymous with era-defining hits, star-making, and innovation than Motown. Started in Detroit with a dream and an $800 loan, Berry Gordy’s Hitsville USA became a cultural behemoth that swiftly hooked pop culture with a brand new beat. The unmistakable, irrepressible sound of young America didn’t just dominate the charts–it crossed the racial divide during the social upheaval of the 1960’s. The hits and cultural influence doesn’t stop as Motown and its family of imprints explore new genres in partnerships with labels including Quality Control Music, which set the stage for signings of Migos and Lil Yachty. In recognition of the brand’s iconic relevance and impact, EBONY is pleased to honor Motowns decades of success. The award will be accepted by Motown President, and EVP of Capitol Music Group. Ethiopia Habtemariam, who is also honored in the Women Up category for her outstanding leadership in the music industry.

Habtemariam, whose former title, President of Urban Music & Co-Head of Creative for Universal Music Publishing, is responsible for revitalizing the storied label that boasts hit makers NE-YO and Erykah Badu. Habtemariam has ushered in a new generation of artists with acts like JAMESDAVIS, Lil Baby, City Girls, and BJ The Chicago Kid. Last summer, Billboard magazine recognized her as Universal Music Group’s Most Powerful African-American Woman.

“We are delighted to announce our celebrated host and award recipients for this year’s EBONY Power 100 Gala,” says Gibson. “Since unveiling our 2018 EBONY Power 100 List last month, the anticipation and buzz throughout the country has been very exciting to see. This year’s gala will surely prove to be the most memorable to date, and I would like to personally congratulate all our honorees.”

The 2018 EBONY Power 100 List recognizes the most influential and inspiring from the business, philanthropic, entertainment, and social activism communities in the following eight categories: Community Crusaders, Disruptors, Entertainment & Arts, Entrepreneurs, Innovators, MVPs, Power Players and the coveted Women Up.

Former President and First Lady Barack and Michelle Obama lead the Entertainment & Arts category, with a focus on Mrs. Obama’s book tour for her new memoir, Becoming. Barry Jenkins, director of the Academy Award-wining Moonlight and the upcoming If Beale Street Could Talk, is also being honored in the category for his achievements in the film industry, as Tony Award-winning actor Billy Porter is for his role in the television series Pose. Other notables being honored in the Entertainment & Arts category include the cast of Black Pantherand rappers Cardi B, Drake and Travis Scott. Athletes being honored in the MVPs category include Houston Rockets guard James Harden, Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry and professional WWE wrestler and superstar Thaddeus Bullard, aka Titus O’Neil.

The 2018 EBONY Power 100 List includes politicians and lawmakers who made the news over the past year, such as Stacey Abrams, the first Black Georgia Democratic gubernatorial nominee (recognized in the Disruptors category); Andrew Gillum, the mayor of Tallahassee, Florida, and the first Black candidate for governor of the Sunshine State (another Disruptors honoree); Keisha Lance Bottoms, the second Black female mayor of Atlanta (recognized in the Women Up category); and London Breed, the first Black female LGBT mayor of San Francisco (also honored in the Women Up category).

Other honorees run the gamut of industry, community activism and more. Civil rights activist Tarana Burke the Bronx, New York native who achieved global acclaim after starting the MeToo movement will be recognized in the Community Crusaders category. Group President and Chief Operating Officer Rosalind Brewer will be honored in the Women Up category as the first African-American woman to the hold that position as at Starbucks. March of Dimes President Stacey D. Stewart will be recognized in the Disruptors category as the first African-American female president to lead the charitable organization. Junior Flip Kids, honored in the Entrepreneurs category, is a company made up of six schoolchildren aged 7 to 13 years old who met with Oprah Winfrey before starting their business to transform distressed properties into renovated single-family homes in Washington D.C., and Maryland. Cheryl “Action” Jackson will be recognized in the Community Crusaders category as the founder of Minnie’s Pantry, an organization that has provided over 8 million meals to families in need.

Honorees are celebrated each year at the EBONY Power 100 Gala, presented by Nationwide. The event will take place this year in Los Angeles at the Beverly Hilton on November. During the gala, the prestigious EBONY Power 100 special award recipients will be recognized for their contributions to business and industry. The 2018 EBONY Power 100 Gala is hosted by EBONY Foundation and benefits Sickle Cell Disease Association of America. Learn more about sickle cell disease and to donate by texting “EBONY” to 91011 and using #SCDHOPEWINS. Follow #EBONYPower100 on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

The complete EBONY Power 100 List for this year can be viewed here!

Grant A Gift Receives Donation From Sale of Vegas Golden Knights Themed 2018 Ford Mustang GT

Grant A Gift Autism Foundation received $250,000 from the sale of a customized Ford Mustang GT themed after the Vegas Golden Knights (VGK) hockey team at Barrett-Jackson’s 2018 Las Vegas auction.

The 2018 Ford Mustang GT Premium Coupe was donated by Las Vegas auto dealership, Gaudin Motor Company, and wrapped in a black and good vinyl design, the official colors of VGK.

Each year, Barrett-Jackson auctions off vehicles to help local and national charity organizations. During the auction, the VGK wrapped Mustang GT sold to a private owner for $250,000. Barrett-Jackson donated 100 percent of the sale proceeds to Grant A Gift Foundation.

Gaudin Motor Company’s Gary Ackerman; VGK players Brad Hunt and Brayden McNabb and Grant A Gift Foundation representatives were all on hand to celebrate.

“We are extremely grateful to Gaudin Motor Company, Barrett-Jackson and of course the donor for supporting Grant A Gift,” says Terri Janison, President and CEO. “This generous and significant donation will help us provide necessary services, access and support to the children living with autism and their families.”

Gaudin Motor Company and its owners, the Ackermans are long-standing advocates of Grant A Gift Autism Foundation and autism awareness.

This past summer, Grant A Gift, in conjunction with the UNLV Medicine Ackerman Autism Center, celebrated the grand opening of the Speech Therapy and Early Start Denver Suite expansion to the Ackerman Autism Center.

For more information in Grant a Gift, click here.

OTR II

By Vaughn Lowery

Last night concluded the Los Angeles leg of OTRII tour, featuring Beyoncé and Jay-Z.

DJ Khaled opened up for the Carters alongside of special guests – Tyga, Tank, YG and Ella Mai. With thousands of screaming fans, Bey and her husband transformed the Rose Bowl into an iconic night to commemorate. Massive LED screens, scores of dancers coupled with pyrotechnics and a state-of-the-art sound system commanded one of the most powerful performances of our lifetime. No wonder the show (earlier this year) has been decorated by both Michelle and Barack Obama’s presence as well as the Kardashians and Oprah. ‘Apeshit‘ off of their latest collaboration Everything is Love was a crowd favorite as Bey spits some serious bars with her epic flow which rivals some of today’s top lyricists.

With less than 8 shows left, you may want to consider making arrangements to see this landmark presentation at on of its last stops.

If anything to witness the bright smiles of 11 high school students who will receive one $100,000 scholarships (per city) from both the BeyGOOD and Shawn Carter foundations.

Remaining OTR II tour dates.

Beyoncé, Jay-Z, 360 magazine

Beyoncé, 360 magazine

Beyoncé, 360 magazine

*Photos courtesy of Frank Micellotta

LIVE! RIHANNA’S SAVAGE × FENTY SHOW

YOUTUBE TO LIVE STREAM

RIHANNA’S SAVAGE x FENTY SHOW

FROM NEW YORK FASHION WEEK

Live on Rihanna’s YouTube Channel For Fans Around The World Beginning

7:30PM ET On September 12

WHO:

YouTube will exclusively live stream Rihanna’s Savage x Fenty Fashion Show from New York Fashion week on Rihanna’s YouTube channel for fans all over the world. The show will be a unique immersive experience and will showcase her line of lingerie and intimate accessories to close out New York Fashion Week 2018.  You can find an announce video here: https://www.instagram.com/p/BnmUU5BFRcm/

WHEN:

The live stream will begin at 7:30PM (ET) on Wednesday, September 12, 2018.

WHERE:

Fans can watch the fashion show live on Rihanna’s YouTube channel

PRESS NOTE: The link to the live stream is embeddable so fans can tune in directly on your site:

youtube.com/rihanna

MORE:

Derek Blasberg, YouTube’s newly appointed lead of the new Fashion and Beauty Partnerships Division, is available for interviews upon request.

Artist Pension Trust Announces Art Display

Carefully curated works are featured throughout the New York City building, including in Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group’s newest spaces, Manhatta and Bay Room

Artist Pension Trust (APT) is pleased to announce its new project at 28 Liberty Street, a 60-story skyscraper, located in Manhattan’s Financial District. APT artist works will be featured throughout Fosun International’s 28 Liberty building, including at Manhatta, the Danny Meyer-run Union Square Hospitality Group’s (USHG) newly-opened restaurant and bar, as well as Bay Room, USHG’s first-ever event space, both of which occupy the 60th floor of the building.

“Art has always been essential part of our restaurant designs,” says Meyer. “We are thrilled to include over 100 pieces of artwork from Artist Pension Trust in Manhatta and Bay Room, both by top local talent and established international artists. We love APT’s mission of helping artists and fostering a community between them, and we feel privileged to benefit from their meaningful work, and to share it with our guests.”

Featured artists in the space include Logan Grider, an Oregon-based artist and Theresa Hackett, a Los Angeles-based artist, who will both have their works featured inside Manhatta and Bay Room. Hackett’s work incorporates non-conventional materials to create hybrid landscapes while Grider’s pieces showcase an abstract theme.

“This partnership between APT, Fosun, and USHG is an exciting opportunity for our artist community,” says Zohar Elhanani, CEO of Artist Pension Trust. “We constantly seek new and exciting avenues to highlight the works of APT’s artists and the opportunity to showcase selected art throughout 28 Liberty and in both Manhatta and Bay Room, art that has been personally selected by Danny Meyer, will serve as fantastic exposure for our artists.”

Founded in 2004, APT (Artist Pension Trust) is a unique social initiative, designed to bring financial security and international exposure to a select group of emerging and established artists around the world. APT acts as a mutual assurance program, allowing participating artists to benefit from the sale of each other’s work — in essence, ensuring that the big-name artists behind blockbuster shows can support the work of talented peers still gaining art world recognition.

Since its foundation, APT has worked with some of the world’s leading contemporary artists, from Turner Prize winners to recipients of prestigious awards including the Prix de Rome and Deutsche Bank’s Artist of the Year. Works by APT artists have been loaned for exhibitions at the world’s leading institutions and have been prominent features of events including Art Basel and the Venice Biennale.

See some of the works that will be featured here: https://www.mutualart.com/apt/

About Artist Pension Trust

Artist Pension Trust (APT) was established in 2004 to provide artists with added financial security at every stage of their career, through a unique, patented model that allows participants to benefit from one another’s success. The APT model ensures that 72% of the net proceeds from the sale of an artwork goes back to its artist and their peers: 40% to the artist who created the work, and 32% shared among artists in their regional group.