Posts tagged with "fear"

The Handbook for Eliminating Stress for Sustainable Change in Work and Life

Stress and anxiety are part of leadership and life, but what if someone told you these feelings are simply self imposed states of mind and that humans belong to an ego-thought system that is a very common way of seeing, thinking and behaving in the world? That we can be hurt by nothing but our thoughts? Or that in order to be a truly transformational leader and enjoy a more peaceful and prosperous life in both business and family, one most surrender the ego to a higher power?

All too often, organizations implementing operational excellence do so without addressing the human and cultural implications of such a change strategy. They conduct studies, move equipment, reduce work in process, allocate employees and change measurement systems, all focusing on minimizing waste and improving the flow of value through the value stream, but they overlook the human impact of these changes, the mindset and belief system that must accompany it.

In Miracle-Minded Manager: A Modern Day Parable about How to Apply A Course in Miracles in Business [Beyond Words, October 22, 2019], “zentrepreneur” and mindful leadership expert John J. Murphy teaches readers how to get out of their own way by shifting their thinking to see life—and themselves—very differently. By integrating teachings of A Course in Miracles (ACIM), a unique, spiritual self-study program designed to awaken us to the truth of our oneness with God and love, along with other great spiritual lessons, Miracle Minded Manager helps people improve their lives. Readers are provided with the tools to eliminate stress, not just manage it, through a non-sectarian, non-denominational spiritual tone in which everyone can participate.

“The next time you have a big problem, look in the mirror,” says Murphy. “People all over the world are stressed, especially as innovation, change and uncertainty accelerate. More importantly, people are stressed and they are not aware it is a condition of their own making. The ego mindset is projecting a negative outcome or possibility onto the future and when we dwell on what could go wrong, we feel anxious and afraid. These negative assumptions, projected by the mind, are triggering fear and stress. It is like being nervous before giving a speech or taking an exam. We are nervous because we ‘think’ something might go wrong. Mindful leadership is essential to helping people see things differently – by teaching them to see in a different way, a miracle-minded way.

Miracle-Minded Manager is the sequel to Murphy’s Agent of Change: Leading a Cultural Revolutionbut it is not necessary to read Agent of Change before reading this book. An intriguing parable about bringing more inspiration, harmony, balance, and peace of mind to corporate culture, Miracle Minded Manager offers insightful lessons on how to overcome fear and eliminate stress in all areas of their lives. Through an entertaining and compelling fictional narrative, readers will learn how to apply the spiritual ideas of ACIM and the law of attraction to everyday challenges, discover practical meditation techniques, and experience a transformational shift in thinking to discover a whole new level of understanding, awareness and appreciation in life.

The story features enlightening conversations between two characters, Jack MacDonald, the president of a business unit of TYPCO (Typical Company), and Jordan McKay, an intriguing business consultant. With the help of Jordan, Jack learns how to overcome a great deal of resistance to completely reinvent the organizational culture he leads. In addition to this, he learns valuable insights that apply to his personal life. It is here that Jack first learns of the ACIM course and begins to apply it himself, along with the help of his wife.

Miracle Minded Manager can help business and government leaders, people living in stress and those seeking enlightenment, no matter what they are doing, overcome:

  • Fear, anxiety, worry and stress – at work and at home.
  • Challenging relationships – at work and at home.
  • Business culture issues; Divisiveness

“We all get in our own way from time to time by doubting ourselves and thinking inside a box- a paradigm- that doesn’t exist,” adds Murphy. “It could be a ‘rule’ that we follow, like we have to work 40 hours per week, eat three meals a day or wear certain clothing styles. We spend countless hours trying to find ways to improve performance and results inside these ‘boxes.’ Entire industries are being disrupted by innovations challenging old paradigms. The same is true in our personal lives. If we can find innovative ways to work four hours a day, or three days a week, why not? In healthcare, if we can find ways to prevent illness and disease, rather than treat it, what might that look like? This is what miracle-minded management is all about. It is about challenging old paradigms with a truly open and fearless mind.”

About the Author:

John J. Murphy is a global business consultant, speaker, spiritual mystic, “zentrepreneur,” and award winning author. He is Founder (1988) and CEO of Venture Management Consultants, Inc., a firm specializing in creating lean, high performance work environments.  As a business consultant, Murphy has delivered services to some of the world’s leading organizations, including ADP, AlliedSignal (Honeywell), BMW, Chase, the CIA, GE, GM, GSK, Hilton, Lockheed Martin, Merck, the Michigan State Senate, Perrigo, Prudential, Raytheon, Spectrum Health, Target Stores, Teva, and the US Navy. As an educator and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt, Murphy has trained thousands of people from over 50 countries, including Fortune 500 executives, project leaders, military leaders, managers, and black belts. He has mentored dozens of project teams in Organizational Development, Operational Excellence, Business Process Innovation and Lean Six Sigma applications. As a speaker, Murphy has delivered keynotes and seminars worldwide. A critically-acclaimed authority on peak performance, transformational leadership and healthy mind-body-spirit, Murphy is a best-selling author who has published 19 books and appeared on over 400 radio and television stations and his work has been featured in over 50 newspapers nationwide.

Murphy is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame (BBA Finance) and the University of Michigan’s Human Resource Executive Program. He is also a former quarterback for Notre Dame.

Connect with John J. Murphy on Facebook @Author.John.J.Murphy, Twitter @sageleader, LinkedIn @johnjmurphymystic, YouTube @AuthorJohnJMurphy, Instagram @jjmurphy13 and visit www.johnjmurphy.org.

Miracle-Minded Manager: A Modern Day Parable about How to Apply A Course in Miracles in Business releases on October 22, 2019 in paperback and e-Book.

Mental Health Awareness

Mental Health Awareness Days Approaching: April is Stress Awareness Month | May is Mental Health Month

May 7th is National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day

Expert Offers Six Tips for Dealing with Panic Attacks; Dr. Lata McGinn, Cognitive Behavioral Consultants, White Plains and NYC

A panic attack is a sudden, intense episode of fear or dread accompanied by physical symptoms such as pounding heart, sweating, trembling or shaking, lightheadedness, feeling faint, shortness of breath, choking sensations, nausea, abdominal distress, chest pain, cold and hot chills, numbness and tingling, feelings of being detached or things seeming unreal. Individuals with panic disorder fear that they are going to die, go crazy, or lose control. They then begin to fear getting future attacks and will often change their behaviors to ward off panic attacks; a disorder called agoraphobia.

Tip 1: The first thing to remember is that a panic attack is an emotional alarm that is meant to protect us not harm us. Panic attacks, although unpleasant to experience, are not dangerous. Biologically, a panic attack is the fight-flight response or your body’s mechanism designed to protect you from danger.  It is called the fight-flight response because it helps you fight or flee the danger to protect us. If you are in danger, the fight-flight response would create fear and release adrenalin and create an automatic response in us to take immediate action (attack or run). In panic attacks the fight-flight response kicks in even though you are not in any danger.

Tip 2: Panic attacks usually begin right after a stressful life event so focus on dealing with the stress you are under rather than trying to stop the panic attack.

Tip 3: Fearing that panic will harm you ironically only makes you have more panic attacks – your brain thinks you are in danger when you become afraid of panic attacks so the only thing it knows to do to protect you is to give you more panic attacks. Tell yourself you are not in danger and that it is just a harmless panic attack and that it will go away on its own without you doing anything to stop it.

Tip 4: Trying to stop a panic attack in the middle of an episode is not helpful because you are inadvertently telling your brain that you are in danger even though you are not. Letting the panic attack ride over you until it washes away and not changing your behavior to avoid it or escape it is the best thing you can do. Over time, your brain will learn that you are not in danger and the panic attacks will reduce over time.

Tip 5: Deep, slow breathing exercises (slow, diaphragmatic breathing) that helps regulate oxygen and carbon dioxide can be calming and may be helpful to do regularly as a way of calming your over-anxious state in general. However, it is wise not to use it to stop a panic that you are afraid to have in the moment as it likely won’t work anyway and it will also inadvertently convince your brain that you are in danger.

Tip 6: It is best to first to go to a medical doctor when you have your first attack to make sure it isn’t anything like a thyroid condition etc. Once the doctor rules out any physical basis for panic attacks, it is best to not keep going back and taking unnecessary medical tests over and over again. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to be effective in treating panic disorder and agoraphobia. First, individuals are educated about panic attacks and the physical symptoms of anxiety and fear that are experienced.  Second, they are trained on how examine and change their unhelpful thoughts and beliefs that lead to panic attacks in real time. In addition, individuals are trained to reduce physical tension, and are then exposed to physical sensations of panic and to feared and avoided situations and sensations until the person realizes they are not dangerous. Repeated exposure helps to reduce the fear induced by these situations and teaches the person that the sensations experienced are not dangerous. When the fear of the physical sensations is reduced, future panic attacks are reduced.

Dr. Lata K. McGinn

Lata K. McGinn, PhD is a licensed clinical psychologist and co-founder of Cognitive Behavioral Consultants. She is also a tenured Professor of Psychology, Director of the Doctoral Clinical Program, and Director of the University-based Cognitive Behavior Therapy Training Program for Anxiety and Depressive Disorders at the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University/Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Dr. McGinn presents her research worldwide and is regularly invited to conduct keynotes, lectures, seminars and workshops throughout the world to professionals, consumers, schools, agencies, and companies. Her research focuses on vulnerability and prevention of anxiety and depressive disorders. She has recently developed an intervention to prevent the development of depression and has tested the efficacy of this intervention in a NIH funded research study.

About Cognitive & Behavioral Consultants, LLP

CBC is a clinical and training center comprised of internationally recognized mental health professionals who have researched, pioneered, and are highly experienced in delivering cutting edge evidence-based treatments that help adults, adolescents, and children live more fulfilled lives. Founded in 2004 by Drs. Lata K. McGinn and Alec L. Miller, leaders in the fields of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, the CBC team provides a large array of Clinical and Wellness services to the public, provides Custom Designed Programs for schools, agencies, and businesses, and conducts Continuing Education for Professionals in the field of psychology throughout the year. More information can be found here.

Handling Your Anger

5 STEPS TO UNDERSTANDING YOUR ANGER AND HANDLING IT EFFECTIVELY IN INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS

Anger can be a normal and healthy emotion. So why is it often so problematic? Here are a few signs that your anger may be harmful rather than helpful:

  • I’m often told I have a “bad temper”
  • Others distance themselves from me when I’m angry
  • Expressing anger leads to fighting
  • I don’t feel understood when I’m angry

Let’s take some time to understand anger in a different way.

As normal and as common as anger is, the emotion is frequently misunderstood and mishandled. In today’s day and age, we are taught that we are supposed to let others know exactly how we feel, which can be helpful at times; however, expressing anger is complicated for two main reasons. First, because it is often a secondary emotion, meaning that people often use anger to mask more vulnerable feelings such as hurt disappointment or fear. These feelings may be frightening because they can leave us feeling weak and helpless. This may cause us to resort to showing anger instead so that we can maintain a sense of control. Second, anger can be problematic because expressing anger, in the wrong way, can trigger fear, defensiveness and anger in the recipient. This may cause the other person to begin to protect him or herself instead of trying to understand you.

So What Is Anger?

In its purest form, anger can be a natural response to feeling purposely violated or wronged in some way. When we believe that someone has intentionally violated us, anger can give us the energy to stand up for ourselves. However, the way in which we understand and express our anger can either cause constructive or destructive results.

If expressing anger leaves you feeling misunderstood, or others feeling hurt, angry or shut down, these tips may help.

1. TAKE A MOMENT TO BREATHE

When you notice that you are feeling angry, slowing down your breath can give you a sense of self-control and peace. This will give you time and space to think about your process so that you don’t go on autopilot. If you feel tension in a particular part of your body, breathe relaxation into it.    

2. NOTICE WHAT YOU ARE FEELING

Notice the thoughts that are passing through your mind and the emotions in your body. Is there a tinge of sadness or fear? Are you longing for something? Do you need reassurance? Because many people fear that the other person won’t be there for them in the way they need, these softer feelings often get ignored.  

3. DISCUSS YOUR CONCERNS

Let the other person know that you have some apprehension about sharing your feelings because you fear that he or she won’t be receptive. For example, you may say something like “It’s hard for me to tell you what I need because I think you will judge me.” Once this is in the open, discuss this with the other person until you feel safe enough to share your more vulnerable feelings.

4. BE WILLING TO ADDRESS THE SOFTER FEELINGS

Acknowledging feelings such as loneliness and the desire for acceptance and appreciation can trigger feelings of vulnerability. However, expressing these feelings can connect you to others. When you let someone know your needs, if the dynamic is healthy, the other person will likely try to understand them and help search for a viable solution.

5. BE SOLUTION ORIENTED

Think about your intentions. What are you trying to accomplish by addressing your anger with others? Are you trying to hurt them in the same way you believe they hurt you? If so, this can feed into a destructive pattern of fractured relationships. On the other hand, if your goal is to resolve the issue so that you can build trust and harmony with the other person, then addressing your anger can be helpful. See my blog on Conflict Resolution for detailed steps on how to address conflict.

Understanding and addressing your anger in a way that restores harmony in your relationships can be easy when we focus on the right thing. Call me today for a free consultation so that I can help you change your relationship with anger from one that is harmful to one that creates peace.

 

About Dr. Crystal Clements:

Dr. Crystal Clements is an adjunct professor and registered psychological assistant who practices in Downtown Los Angeles at Sync Counseling Center. She works with adults, adolescents, couples and families to treat depression, anxiety, grief, trauma, and relational issues. She loves what she does and is passionate about helping people feel good about themselves and life. Dr. Crystal earned a PhD in Clinical Psychology with an emphasis in Family Studies and MAs in Psychology and Christian Leadership from the Fuller Graduate School of Psychology. She earned a BA in Communications from the University of Pennsylvania. As part of her training, she completed an APA accredited internship in Health Service Psychology at California State University, Fullerton.

Contact her today for a free 15 minute consultation!

 

Izzy Escobar

Overcoming hardship and transforming it into triumph through music is nothing new, but it takes a unique talent to do it in a way that truly leaves an impact on one’s psyche. Such is the case with Singer-Songwriter Izzy Escobar, whose debut single “Broken Wings” (Available everywhere digitally on June 29th!) showcases her commanding attitude and powerful vocal prowess in very distinct fashion.

With “Broken Wings”, subtle synth work and a stomping beat lay the groundwork for an alluring lyrical journey of determination shining through pain as Escobar sings Right here in my place all these walls suddenly disintegrate // Into dust, into here, it flies away out of the atmosphere // And I feel like I can fly with broken wings”.


“I believed that music and song had the potential to change lives because of the way it is able to positively affect our emotions and perceptions”

WATCH: “BROKEN WINGS” OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO

Izzy Escobar’s music is about loving one another the way we want to be loved ourselves. And having FUN along the way! Rising from a “never ending circle of violence” from an abusive stepparent, where she was voiceless in protecting her own family members, she began channeling that pain into lyrics–and eventually songs–at a very young age. “I began to write words, and soon realized that I could synchronize the words in my diary with the tune in my head” says the Massachusetts native, whose latest singles show how far she’s come from that frightened girl to a strong, capable woman who wants to spread her message of hope and strength to those who may face their own struggles. “A few years later, as I read through that same songbook, I noticed that I had made a shift from finding my voice to helping those who couldn’t find their own”.

As she continued on her musical journey, Escobar took to not only writing and singing, but reading sheet music and studying music theory, as well as playing the violin, guitar, and piano. “I believe that to be a healthy human being, we must have an idea of who we are, and what our existence is. But the promise of a home safe from physical abuse and fear remains elusive for many millions of women and children in this country. Now an accomplished singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, she continues to channel her strengths into giving a voice to the voiceless, and helping those who face the same fate as she had in her youth.

Make Sure to Check Out “Broken Wings”, Available Everywhere Digitally (iTunes, Spotify, Google Play etc.)