Posts tagged with "expensive"

Most Expensive States For Speeding

The United States is a vast nation connected by the automobile. But while our car culture helps connect the far reaches of the country to each other, it also comes with some clear limitations. Like how fast you can travel whilst zipping from the Grand Canyon to the Great Smoky Mountains on your cross-country road trip. And few things can ruin a vacation quite like getting slapped with a speeding ticket.

However, depending on where you get it, a speeding ticket can range from a minor annoyance to a significant financial burden. A $20 fine isn’t always a huge burden to bear, but relatively few Americans can afford to fit an unexpected fee of $300 into their normal budget. So, before you set out on your great American road trip, it might be worth learning how much a ticket would cost you in the states along your route.

To determine this, GOBankingRates delved into the cost of a speeding ticket in each state using data from GoCompare.com’s Harsher Penalties 2018 study. The GOBankingRates study then compared the cost of a ticket for traveling 13 mph over the posted speed limit for a first-time offender and assuming no additional fees established a ranking of the expected cost by state.

UK Households Spending More Than They Earn

  • UK cost of living for a four-person family is £60,000 per year – 103 per cent of average household income
  • UK housing and utility costs have risen by 13 per cent1
  • The global study found the most affordable expat country for families is Sweden

Today, new research by leading price comparison website MoneySuperMarket reveals that the UK is the most expensive location to raise a family. The running costs associated with a four-person family in the UK exceeded those of Spain, USA, Germany and Sweden due to the high costs of rent, utility bills and groceries2.

The data is based on the average monthly cost of property, utility bills and grocery shopping for a family with two children in 10 locations. These locations are some of the most popular destinations for the British public to emigrate to. MoneySuperMarket also ranked the costs against the countries’ average full time salary, to reveal the percentage of salary two working adults must put towards household expenses. In the UK, the average cost of a four-person family is more than twice the combined total of two adults’ salaries4.

Popular expat destinations with lower living costs

With lower utility bills (£94.41 per month), heavily subsidised pre-school costs (£230.34) and a standard average monthly rent of £1,149.40, Sweden is the only country analysed where a single parent can comfortably afford to have two children, working out as 87 per cent of the average working salary5. Based on two adults with two children it’s even more affordable, eating into less than half (43 per cent) of the combined salaries.

The full ranking of the affordable global cities to raise a family, including a breakdown of all metrics, can be seen below:

Global cost of raising a four-person family

Changing costs over time

On average, the weekly food shop has lowered in price for families over the last 16 years, from £236 to £232. However, spending on both housing and utilities, and household goods and services, has increased by 11 per cent overall. In 2001, the average monthly cost of housing and utilities per person in the UK was £277.77, but by 2017 this figure had risen by 13 per cent to £314.82. Due to these rises, the cost of raising a family in the UK has become more expensive.

For more information on the most affordable countries to move to, check out the MoneySuperMarket report around the changes in UK household spending over time.

THE ECONOMIST x OPEN FUTURE

The Economist, a leading source of analysis on international business and world affairs, today announced “Open Future”, an editorially driven initiative (www.economist.com/openfuture) which aims to remake the case for The Economist’s founding principles of classical British liberalism which are being challenged from all sides in the current political climate of populism and authoritarianism.

“Although the world has changed dramatically since James Wilson founded The Economist to fight against the Corn Laws, the liberalism we have championed since 1843 is as important and relevant as ever,” said Zanny Minton Beddoes, editor-in-chief, The Economist.  “Yet the core tenets of that liberalism—faith in free markets and open societies—face greater resistance today than they have for many years. From globalization to free speech, basic elements of the liberal credo are assailed from right and left.”

Content for Open Future will be developed and organised around five themes: Open Society (diversity, and individual rights versus group rights); Open Borders (migration); Open Markets (trade, markets, taxes and welfare reform); Open Ideas (free speech); and Open Progress (the impact and regulation of technology). In addition to content from The Economist editorial staff, the Open Future hub will feature commentary from outside contributors, including from those with dissenting points of view.

The initiative launches with a debate between Larry Summers and Evan Smith about no-platforming and free speech at universities. Mr Summers is the Charles W. Eliot University Professor and President Emeritus at Harvard University. He served as Secretary of the Treasury for President Clinton and as the Director of the National Economic Council for President Barack Obama. Evan Smith is a Research Fellow in history at Flinders University in Adelaide, Australia and is writing a book on the history of no-platforming.

A special report on the future of liberalism written by editor-in-chief Zanny Minton Beddoes will appear in the newspaper’s 175th anniversary edition dated September 15th. And on that Saturday, the newspaper will host the Open Future Festival, to be held simultaneously in Hong Kong, London and New York. There will also be an Open Future essay contest for young people; surveys and other data visualizations; podcasts; social-media programs and new video from Economist Films.

Automotive Video Association Top Finalists

(Courtesy of Instagram— Mercedes-AMG)


THE AUTOMOTIVE VIDEO ASSOCIATION (AVA) ANNOUNCES TOP FINALISTS FOR THE AVA AWARDS – APPROPRIATELY TITLED: “THE MOUNTAIN RUN”



— Performance is the Theme for 2017 with 12 Vehicles Making the List —




The Automotive Video Association (AVA), which represents nearly 500 million unique viewers per year, today announced the list of finalists for the first-ever AVA Awards. The AVA award program will be hosted Saturday, September 23rd, 2017, and held at the Resort of the Mountain in Welches, Oregon. Titled “The Mountain Run,” the AVA selected High Performance as the vehicle category for 2017 pitting some of the world’s most incredible cars and SUV’s up against one another in an all-out battle for driving supremacy. The Finalists are:
Performance Car

 
Performance SUV

 
Awards competition programs are serious business in the auto industry and the AVA has developed a program that both tests out the cars capabilities, but also sets a tone of having fun while doing it. Consumers in the market place do care about horsepower numbers, but they also car about how a car will function as a daily driver. They care about how the Bluetooth works and whether the adaptive cruise control and lane departure warning actually help the driver operate the vehicle. The AVA Award program sets out to showcase all that is great about these top finalist vehicles, but also where they may be lacking in some areas. One vehicle will be crowned in each category, but the scores will be public knowledge on all vehicles.

The AVA was formed by video media outlets that span the country and this group represents the auto industry’s first-ever national media organization that focuses on video exclusively. 
The AVA was established to provide media outlets that specialize in video content the ability to promote their industry, which is the fastest growing segment within the spectrum of automotive media. The organization is made up of some of the most prominent and most followed automotive outlets in the country.

Over the past month, the AVA has been solicited by a handful of video media outlets to join this organization. The AVA looks forward to having more members join and to do this in a way that benefits all parties involved, the AVA is developing a solid foundation in 2017 and 2018 with its founding members. Once this association has been fully developed and two AVA Awards events have taken place, the group will gladly open its doors to new members.

The AVA has no boundaries and its content spans the globe. The new coalition helps promote the video aspect of covering the greater auto industry. The organization also isn’t limited to just card carrying journalists. The AVA has members that have a variety of backgrounds. The unifying nature is video and all video content is owned by its members.

The overarching goal of the AVA is to promote video as the primary outlet for content, but is also aimed at auto makers as well to showcase the power of video. Consumers today, look to video for their news. The combined bandwidth of the AVA is in the millions for monthly unique views. This is something no traditional media outlet can do.

Although we reported on the founding members in our last news release, the below is a quick reminder of these media groups are:

Nik Miles (OurAutoExpert.com) – Northwest

Roman Mica (The Fastlane Car) – Midwest

Alex Dykes (AlexOnAutos) – Northern Cal

Kyle Lindsey (Saabkyle04) – North Carolina

Sofyan Bey (Redline Reviews) – DC

Jason Fenske (Engineering Explained) – Idaho

Matt Maranowski (Matt Maran Motoring) – Pennsylvania

 
For more details and information on the Automotive Video Association, please contact DRIVEN360 at 310-374-6177 or officeadmin@godriven360.com.