Posts tagged with "entertainment"

Wheels Bike-Share App

Last night, Los Angeles’ elite came out to celebrate the launch of Wheels – California’s latest bike-share app at Sunset Tower!

Guests including Kelly Osbourne, Drew Taggart and  Alex Pall (of The Chainsmokers), Nicole Scherzinger, Larsa Pippen, Delilah Belle Hamlin, Jessica Szohr, James Kennedy, Logan Paul, and King Bach attended the glamourous soiree. DJ, Chantel Jeffries had attendees grooving all night as she set the tempo for the evening, just before The Chainsmokers took the stage for a surprise perforsunmance.

Having just took the stage for winning the best Dance Album at the iHeartRadio’s Music Awards. The Chainsmokers were seen in high spirits are they spun their latest hits. Also in attendance was Marshmello who won awards for New Pop Artist and Dance Artist at the iHeartRadio’s Music Awards. The party was the place to be as everyone partied into the late morning!

GiGi Cesare

GiGi, is a passionate award-winning actress and recording artist with multicultural roots. She is currently in the studio recording her debut tracks with hopes to emerge as the first teen EDM Trap Pop recording artist. GiGi’s sound is unique and captivating and her stunning vocals are just as intuitive. Influenced by pop stars as diverse as Lil Miquela, Post Malone and George Michael, GiGi has conceived a unique blend of R&B, soul and trap pop music with a twist. Even at the young age of 13, she is already making headlines, not only as a musician, but also as an actress. Last year, she received an unprecedented nomination at the Imagen Awards for Best Actress in a feature film competing against fellow nominees Salma Hayek and Eva Longoria. She plays principal roles in two films currently in post production, a dramatic comedy Space Captain and Callista and comedy, Go With The Flow. Learn more about GiGi, and do not miss out on her upcoming releases.

For all things GiGi go here.

Michael Evans Behling

By Krishan Narsinghani

As of late, 360 Magazine sat down with actor, Michael Evans Behling, to discuss his story on becoming a series regular on the hit CW tv-show “All American.”

Behling was born in Columbus, OH but raised in Columbus, IN. Growing up, he played football, volleyball and ran track & field. Before pursuing college for track, Behling’s mother pushed him to try his hand at modeling. Flash forward one year, the biracial newcomer shot for notable brands like Nike, Finish Line and White Castle. Discovering a passion for comedic shorts via social media, Behling paved a career path that created an escape from negativity and depression. His personal life in a funk, acting molded that release and in return, made himself and others feel better. A bold move to LA quickly proceeded and transformed his life.

What do you think been your favorite part of shooting All American?

An outstanding cast. People-wise, we are a family that clicked from the beginning. There’s such a nice atmosphere including the production! Whether in the morning or night, I’m smiling going in.

Being relatively new to working the industry, what is one thing you would work on more?

To continue working even more and getting out on stage. Whether it means taking more classes and working as much I can to get even more comfortable doing my job.

One thing you’d work on less:

Before going into work. Whenever you get to set, you make something fun. The challenging part is when you get home at 3AM after a sixteen hour day and you have to prep for the next day. During the past 8 months, I didn’t sleep but it’s worth it. Being on stage, I’m still new and have a lot to learn. There are still moments where I felt like I could have done something better but it’s this feeling of “unsure” where I hesitate.

Describe your role and thoughts on your character Jordan:

Jordan is a cocky, confused, angsty high schooler who is the Beverly Hills High School quarterback. He’s dealing with some major identity issues, especially when Spencer comes to town and sees how his father and him connect – I think he’s got a really good heart and a lot of love for his sister and mom, but wants to connect with his Dad and fill his shoes. He’s slightly a jock with underlying actions and a lot of pain I have to hit while on set. Jordan’s a mixed kid who’s struggling to find himself but vicariously living through his dad. We’re both mixed so there’s a strong connection.

What advice to you have for minorities and kids of color breaking into the industry?

Right now we have an advantage – use this time now to get your training, get headshots and get whatever you need to get into the room. What’s the number one thing you could do before you get in? Ask yourself why you want to be in the industry. Do you know why you want to get into the industry for the right reasons? It’s because you want to make a change and love the craft. You love entertainment and make a positive change in somebody’s life.

One you get into the room, and you perform it’s out of your control. The door is going to open at some point. Stay positive and don’t get discouraged.

Tuscan Women Cook

A Culinary Immersion Vacation Experience

Have you ever wanted to learn to cook in Italy, to participate in Tuscan cooking classes? And return home with recipes handed down over generations and collected by us since 2000? Each spring and fall, Coleen Kirnan and Rhonda Vilardo welcome guests from around the world to live, breath and cook as Italians do. Taking advantage of their years of business experience and knowledge, as master event planners, they create an insider’s Tuscan itinerary filled friendly, knowledgeable tour guides, translators, drivers and private cooking classes that only a local resident could access.

Indulge yourself in the Tuscan lifestyle and discover the region’s passion for food and wine in a small group of 18 people or less. The best cooks in all of Tuscany, the local women, or “nonnas,” teach their classes. They’ll share regional techniques, ingredients, and family recipes that have been passed down over the centuries. Put on your apron, gather around the old farmhouse table, get wrist-deep in pasta dough and learn Tuscan cooking from the source. You’ll learn first-hand how to make gnocchi, tagliatelli, and pici— thick strings of handmade eggless pasta made originally in Montefollonico.

Your week with Tuscan Women Cook includes six night’s accommodation at Agriturismo Belagaggio, a restored farmhouse in Montefollonico, breakfast, lunch, and dinner every day, cooking classes, daily sightseeing, visits to local artisans, cheese and wine tastings. Full day sight- seeing in Siena with a private guide who has a doctorate in Sienese history. Full translation is provided at all classes. Transportation to all activities is in a Mercedes minibus with private driver.

For wine lovers, Tuscan Women Cook is situated in the heart of Brunello de Montalcino and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano country, and border on the Chianti wine region. This is the center of the new Italian wine renaissance and a dream locale for your next getaway with family and friends. Wine connoisseurs plan the ultimate Bucket List trip here to sample new wines and visit the spectacular vineyards. Tuscan Women Cook hosts will provide you with exclusive introductions to renowned Tuscan vintners and opportunities to purchase their award-winning wines for their personal cellars.

To learn more about Tuscan Women Cook and view beautiful photos and videos, visit www.TuscanWomenCook.com.

Tuscan women cook, 360 MAGAZINE, Italy, wine, Vaughn Lowery

Tuscan women cook, 360 MAGAZINE, Italy, wine, Vaughn Lowery

Tuscan women cook, 360 MAGAZINE, Italy, wine, Vaughn Lowery

Prolight x Sound Guangzhou 2019

As the curtain fell on Prolight + Sound Guangzhou 2019 (PLSG), show organisers announced a new record of 1,353 exhibitors who flocked to the annual event from 25 countries and regions, along with 81,154 professional visitors (7% up) from the entire professional lighting, audio, event management, stage design, system integration and AV technology industry chain. Combined with an overall exhibition area of over 130,000 sqm, this marks the largest ever edition of PLSG to date.

Ms Judy Cheung, Deputy General Manager of Messe Frankfurt (HK) Ltd, is delighted with the turnout this year: “PLSG is committed to supporting the industry’s development by offering a first-class business and information exchange platform for the entertainment sector. We wanted our exhibitor showcase and fringe events to cover every corner of the industry’s needs, and to echo the growing trends in media technologies and system integration. We’re proud to be able to capture so many opportunities all under one roof.”

Much to the delight of participants, many key pro audio and lighting brands could be found across all of the halls this year, including Adamson, AKG, Antari, APG, Art Sound, Asystems, Audinate, Audio-technica, Beta Three, Beyma, BIK, BMB, Boray, Bosch, Bose, Broad Future, Celestion, Charming, DAS, Colour Imagination, CD-Stage, d&b Audiotechnik, db Technologies, DMT, Eagle, EM Acoustics, Ezpro, Faitalpro, Fane, FBT, Fidek, Fine Art, Funktion-one, Gonsin, Haimei, Harman International, Hivi, HTDZ, IAG, ITC, Klotz, Konig & Meyer, Kvant, Laserworld, Lavoce, Lewitt, Longjoin, Mascot, Meyer Sound, Mipro, Mode, Montarbo, Nan Yi, Nexo, Nightsun, Pangolin, PCI, Phoenix, Plustruss, Polarlights, QSC, Rainbow, RCF, Redx, Ruisheng, SAE, SE Audiotechnik, Sennheiser, Seikaku, Showven, Shure, Soundking, ST Audio, Star-net, SWS, Taiden, Takstar, Tendzone, Thunderstone, TOA, Top Plot, TW Audio, Viashow, Vue Audiotechnik, Yamaha, Yes-tech and more.

The success of the fair and its increased global brand representation were clearly reflected on the show floor. The event served as an opportunity for brands to showcase their latest innovations to the region for the first time in 2019, many of which have been specifically catered to the Chinese market. The show’s display areas were presented under a new arrangement this year too, with the ‘Media Systems and Solutions’ and ‘Communication and Conference’ halls under the show’s Audio Brand Name halls receiving high praise.

The event’s popularity this year can be attributed to its extensive cooperation with local and overseas industry associations, leading companies and professional media. Each contributed by inviting a number of high quality buyer groups and organising well-attended fringe events. A total of 11 domestic and international visitor groups attended the fair, and local industry media HC360 hosted a product presentation for over 1,000 professional buyers. Elsewhere, increased internationalism was also reflected in the show’s premium buyer groups, some of which came from the China Association of Recording Engineers, the Guangdong Association of Stage Art, the Zhejiang Province Stage and Audio Institute and Entertainment Equipment Industry Technology Association (EEITA) from Taiwan.

In terms of the PLSG fringe programme this year, both attendees and speakers emphasised how each event offered valuable information exchange, networking and educational and training opportunities which added an extra dimension to the show’s offerings. Digital audio networks in particular were heavily discussed, including through a sold out panel discussion on AVIT and how artificial intelligence (AI) solutions can influence the market, as well as the returning Dante Certification courses. Elsewhere, one of the most popular concurrent activities was the series of four Outdoor Line Arrays, which welcomed 41 international and domestic brands and a double-string display, which was ever-busy thanks to the favourable weather conditions.

Meanwhile, the first interactive multimedia display in PLSG, the Lighting and Art Space, was extremely well attended with lots of professional visitors and industry new force across the entertainment, media creative and stage design sectors. The area was established to showcase new media technologies associated with 3D mapping, stage machinery, lighting installation, new media art, stage tech innovations and more. Developed in cooperation with Chinese media giant Visual Jockey, the area featured a total of 18 professional visual and display companies and brands, including Epson, Hecoos, Music Trick Lighting, X Color and more demonstrating their latest projection and display systems, and was bustling with intrigued visitors throughout the show.

Participants admire comprehensive coverage across each sector

Mr Hai Xiang, Area Manager, Beijing Tricolor Technology Co Ltd

(Communication and Conference Hall Exhibitor)

“Right now, the key digitalisation trends of the media systems industry involve more intelligent technology, more AI, and more integrated management systems, which all can be seen here at PLSG. We’re promoting our ‘Apollo’ and ‘CrossMedia’ audio and visual monitoring systems in the Communication and Conference Hall of PLSG, which can be applied for security surveillance. The show has such a strong influence in the industry and every year, there are more exhibitors joining which is testament to the organisers. It also helps us learn from our industry peers to continue improving and developing our products in line with the trends.”

Ms May Song, Vice President, Beijing Oriental Prime Connections Film/TV Technology Co Ltd

(Media Systems and Solutions Hall Exhibitor)

“This year is the 20th anniversary for our company, and we chose to host a press conference on the first day of PLSG because it’s such an influential show associated with our field of work. We’re also here to showcase some of our audio products which have been used in the Olympic Games and at a number of national conferences. The high visitor flow is a huge benefit for us, because a lot of quality buyers have been interested in visiting our booth, including from China, India, the Philippines, Vietnam and Korea. The show acts as a bridge between us and new business opportunities, because clients can discover us for the first time and we can interact with them face-to-face. It also helps us better understand customers’ demands to produce better products.”

Mr Allen Tan, Product Marketing Manager, Bosch (Shanghai) Security Systems Ltd

(Media Systems and Solutions Hall Exhibitor)

“The PLSG show is very influential, has a huge scale, and is the first major exhibition after the Chinese New Year, which helps gather a lot of buyers from both China and overseas. This also makes the show very suitable for us to launch new products and technologies, and showcase the strength of our brand to the right audience. All in all, we’ve met a lot of potential clients already, and the results are very exciting for us.”

Ms Julie Zhu, Vice President of China Region, Kvant Ltd

(Lighting Hall Exhibitor)

“Kvant has exhibited at PLSG for 10 years and manufactures laser display systems. The entertainment industry in China is growing robustly and has huge potential, and even some of the tourist spots here are demanding these kinds of advanced audio and visual technologies for creative performances. The fair always provides us a good chance to further promote our brand and showcase our advanced laser lighting products to buyers. It is one of the most important platforms for us to better understand the Chinese market trends.”

Mr Yosef Levy, Owner, RST Audio Equipment Ltd

(Overseas Buyer)

“I’m here at the show to source new audio equipment and technology from the Asian market, so I can develop my own business in Tel Aviv, Israel. I’ve noticed there are a lot of brands here who are working on integrated solutions and providing systems of international quality. It’s also been very busy, which means there are a lot of opportunities for me to chat with industry peers from all around the world, as well as many domestic and international audio brands. I’d like to follow up my time at the show by placing some orders, and I may meet with my new contacts again at the Shanghai show later this year.”

Mr Eli Wu, System Designer, Shenzhen Ezpro Sound and Light Technology Co Ltd

(Chinese Buyer)

“This is my fourth time to visit PLSG and I’m looking for some audio and lighting related solutions for my company. The fair accommodates both large and small scale exhibitors from local and overseas, and allows visitors to find a wide range of products. It definitely caters to buyers’ needs comprehensively. I’ve met lots of high quality suppliers at the fair, and their products are useful and provide a perfect user experience at the same time. The fair not only allows us to learn the industry latest trends through its well-rounded fringe programme events, but also acts as an important meeting point for the industry.”

Mr Kane Zhang, Senior Application Engineer, Biamp Systems

(Fringe Speaker)

“This is my first time to PLSG, where I’m hosting a session on AVB and also a panel discussion on AVIT. The content and details for these kinds of fringe events offer a face-to-face element and a more intimate setting for people to voice out their thoughts to learn from one another. Only through these platforms can we tap into future technologies and continue developing our industry. To me, PLSG is a huge show with lots of industry experts coming together, which has allowed it to grow into such a good platform to match our industry goals.”

Mr Kevin Gu, Vice President, Shanghai Epean Exhibition Creative Development Co Ltd

(Lighting and Art Space Attendee)

“The new Lighting and Art Space offers a very comprehensive coverage of reflected technology for sound and lighting electronic innovations in an exciting way. The light show for the miniature St Paul’s Cathedral replica is particularly impressive. Nowadays, visitors are looking for more ways to interact with hands-on exhibits, and I believe some of the technologies shown in this space will be part of the industry’s biggest trends in the future, as they can be widely applied to many cultural and creative events such as in art exhibitions and museums. It will help different kinds of innovations become a reality, and makes the experience more fun.”

The 2020 edition of Prolight + Sound Guangzhou will be held from 19 – 22 February 2020 at Area A and B of the China Import and Export Fair Complex in Guangzhou, China. Prolight + Sound Guangzhou is organised by Messe Frankfurt and the Guangdong International Science and Technology Exhibition Company (STE). For more details about the show, visit www.prolightsound-guangzhou.com.

Other shows under the Prolight + Sound brand include:

Prolight + Sound

2 – 5 April 2019, Frankfurt

Prolight + Sound NAMM Russia

12 – 14 September 2019, Moscow

Prolight + Sound Shanghai

10 – 13 October 2019, Shanghai

Prolight + Sound Middle East

15 – 17 October 2019, Dubai

City Gala Los Angeles

4th Annual City Summit & Gala Honors Colin Farrell and Wesley Snipes While Raising Critical Funds for Six Beneficiary Charities.

Socially conscious nonprofit honored at the 4th Annual City Gala.

About City Gala Los Angeles 2019:

The City Gala‘s vision is to advance community through humanitarian activities and events. The founder of the gala, Ryan Long, volunteers for the beneficiaries of the gala for a full year prior to the event. Long’s goal is to train, develop, and assist each beneficiary of the gala that is aligned with solving the world’s global grand challenges. This year’s gala featured amazing speakers such as: Les Brown, Colin Farrell & Wesley Snipes.

The United Intentions Foundation, located in Roswell, GA, was chosen as one of 6 nonprofit beneficiaries this year. The mission of United Intentions is to provide programs and resources to awaken and unite people to the power of their intentions, while utilizing global partnerships to create a world of joy & prosperity for all.

Young Bae

A native of Seoul, South Korea, Young Bae’s childhood reads like a painful chapter of Oliver Twist. Using her innate talent – art – to overcome years of poverty, homelessness and abuse, Young managed to escape.

Young’s mom, an artist herself, was consistently unable to provide and care for her children and members of their community refused to volunteer assistance. Young recalls the cultural reaction to her family’s suffering with clarity,

“Korea is a materialistic country,” confides Young, now proprietor of the marquee Diamond Tattoos shop in New York City’s Times Square. “No matter how hard you work, it is hard to break away from poverty – nobody gives you an opportunity. If you’re poor, you’re poor for life. They treat the less fortunate like shit, hence I couldn’t talk to anybody about how I was living – not even my best friend. So I kept it all a secret, as best I could.”

Young did her best to mix in with other more privileged kids, even as she and her family moved around in church basements, abandoned houses and even a shipping container throughout her teenage years. “I may have been homeless with no money, but I was always fresh and fashionable,” says the self-taught tattoo queen has come a long way to now ink high-profile clientele and eager fans of the drama-filled show, “Black Ink.” “When my family didn’t have access to a shower I would clean up at public restrooms every morning. I’d also get hand-me-down-clothes from church and create my own fashions, or at least I tried to. My teachers suspected I was poor because there were things I couldn’t pay for, but for the most part I think I flew under the radar.”

She didn’t fly under the radar though when it came to her talent, her teachers and classmates acknowledged her ability to sketch, draw as well as paint. Young began receiving accolades for her fabrications, using the sales to buy basic necessities.

Young was able to land a partial academic scholarship to a college where she continued to hone her craft until she was ready to leave Korea.

“New York is an artist’s city,” says the Chugye University graduate, “so it just made sense.”

They say if you can make it in New York, you can make it anywhere and the bonafide hustler Young took the motto to heart. In 2007, the 22-year-old made a beeline for Koreatown in Manhattan, touching down with just $80 and a student visa to study English, she landed a job at a local nail salon.

Despite a language barrier, she wouldn’t stop there. Young continued job hunting, getting jobs at restaurants, jewelry shops, even illegally hawking her art in New York’s famed Union Square. All this to make her share of the rent for a small place with roommates in New Jersey.

On the way to the tattoo shop in NYC, the neon lights of New York City brightly shined on the other side of the Lincoln Tunnel.

Tattooing was illegal in South Korea so Young had no experience. “I walked in, took a look around at the tattoo sketches on the wall, and thought, hey, I could do this. So I offered the shop owners a barter: in exchange for giving me a shot I would clean their shop for free. They agreed.” With that, her apprenticeship commenced.

In no time, Young became confident in her skills and moved to another shop where she could demand a tattoo artist’s wages. Quickly becoming the most requested artist in the shop, Young decided look into owning and operating her own business.

“I rented this little ratty spot on 46th Street in Times Square. It was literally a storage room in the back of an eyebrow threading shop. I got licensed, worked like three additional jobs to afford the $1000/month overhead and scoured the area to find shelves, paint and other stuff to decorate. I upholstered my first tattoo chairs with fake leather I found on the street. Then every day I’d go hold up this human-sized sign advertising my shop, and miraculously people showed up. Eventually so many showed up, I quickly outgrew the space!”

With Young’s growing credibility and reputation among fellow artists throughout the tri-state area, it was no wonder that reality TV show producers eventually came calling.

“My shop might not have been the fanciest, but my work was good and news about me began to spread quickly. It kept getting bigger and busier every year,” she says.

Young was delighted to join VH1’s popular show “Black Ink Crew: New York” during its fifth season. Heading into its seventh season, Young Bae is a fascinating and loveable character to watch.

Through it all, Young gives God the credit for not just where she is today but where’s she’s headed, “I had faith that poverty, homelessness and abuse wouldn’t be the end of my story. I went through all of what I did so I could come out on top on the other end and eventually go on to help others who are vulnerable like I was. There is greatness waiting for us all and I’m determined to live and share my best life now.”

Currently, Young Bae is working on an athleisure line 2one2 and a book sharing her life experiences.

Additional information can be found on her wikipedia.

Chris Lake × Fisher

By Michelle Pisnoy × Vaughn Lowery

6,000 EDM-loving college students filed into the Shrine Expo Hall Thursday prepared to dance the night away. The floor and balcony were packed as Chris Lake and Fisher took to the stage at their sold out show. Throughout the evening, a horde of fans pulsed to every beat the B2B DJ’s created.

At 10:00 pm, the mob of music lovers got rambunctious in anticipation of their performance. Minutes afterwards, the lights were dimmed and the audience began to cheer. Bright lights flashed, the beat began to intensify and the EDM lovers got even rowdier. Fisher and Chris Lake came out and started to perform mixes of different songs. The duo kept the audience engaged by switching between different beats and songs like “Crowd Control.” As soon as the track commenced, the fans began jumping up and down as well as singing along to the lyrics.

Chris Lake then played hit song, “Turn Off the Lights,” featuring Alexis Roberts. The LED lighting technology was in succinct to every beat of the record. At times, almost blinded the hypersensitive congregation, but they didn’t appear to mind. The night came to a culmination when Fisher played “Losing It.” He added synthetic melodies which made it more enchanting than the studio version. The crowd absolutely lost it, singing at the top of their lungs until the lights turned back on.

Women In Media

Women’s Media Center Releases 2019 Status of Women in U.S. Media Report:

Men dominate news, entertainment and digital media

94 studies — including new research from WMC — detail the shape and scope of women’s participation in media

Click here to read the full report.

The Women’s Media Center (WMC) today released its 2019 report on the status of women in U.S. media, which shows that despite some gains, men still dominate in every part of news, entertainment and digital media.

“The Status of Women in the U.S. Media 2019” is comprised of 94 studies, including original research by WMC and aggregated research from academia, industry and professional groups, labor unions, media watchdogs, newsrooms and other sources.

Julie Burton, president of the Women’s Media Center, said the data in the report paints a stark picture. “The media is in a state of great disruption, but despite all of the change, one thing remains the same: the role of women is significantly smaller than that of men in every part of news, entertainment and digital media. It is clear that a cultural, systemic shift is necessary if all parts of the U.S media are to achieve gender and racial parity and move toward a world where stories fully represent the voices and perspectives of diverse women,” she said. “Research spotlighted in this report shows that diversity boosts corporate profits. When boardrooms, newsrooms, studios and tech companies fully reflect the faces, genders and myriad talents of our society, we’re all exceedingly better served.”

The report includes several original WMC studies, including “Divided 2019: The Media Gender Gap,” an assessment of where women stand as media writers, reporters, correspondents and anchors in the major news media platforms, including the prime-time broadcast news programs, print publications, wire services and online news sites. Across all media platforms, men receive 63 percent of bylines and credits; women receive only 37 percent.

“Women have been fighting for greater parity and equality in the news media for decades,” said Maya Harris, co-chair, Women’s Media Center. “This report shows that more work needs to be done to level the playing field. Women and our male allies will not rest until we see wholesale change.”

“When we watch the evening news, we’re not seeing an America that truly reflects all voices,” said Pat Mitchell, co-chair, Women’s Media Center. “Too often, the voices we hear and the images we see are men’s. Men largely are reporting and telling the story even though women represent more than half the U.S. population.”

The report is inclusive and also features WMC’s “The Status of Women of Color in the U.S. News Media 2018,” which offers a rare look at where women journalists of color are — and aren’t — in legacy print, radio, TV, and digital news.

“Missing women of color in the newsrooms of this country is an injustice in itself, and an injustice to every American reader and viewer who is deprived of great stories and a full range of facts,” said Gloria Steinem, WMC co-founder. “Inclusiveness in the newsroom means inclusiveness in the news. Racism and sexism put blinders on everyone.”

In an expanded section on tech, social media, gaming and engineering, “Status 2019” also spotlights the growing threat online to women in media and the perils of failing to protect free and safe speech.

“As part of their day-to-day work, women journalists often face a torrent of harassment, denigration, and threats. The point of this hostility is to silence women, most frequently women of color,” said Soraya Chemaly, director of WMC’s Speech Project. “The onus continues to fall on women’s shoulders as individuals.  Media companies have to develop institutional responses to these threats if they are serious about building inclusive organizations.”

Here are the Status report highlights in traditional print and online-only, radio and television, news consumption, entertainment media and technology, social media, gaming and engineering:

In news media: print and online-only:

  • The American Society of News Editors’ latest tally found that women comprised 41.7 percent and people of color 22.6 percent of the overall workforce in those responding newsrooms.
  • Sports desks at 75 of the nation’s newspapers and online news sites earned a “B+” for racial diversity, a “D+” for gender and racial diversity, combined, and a sixth consecutive “F” for lack of gender equity. (Associated Press Sports Editors)
  • Editors of the nation’s 135 most widely distributed newspapers are overwhelmingly male and White. (Columbia Journalism Review)
  • 69 percent of news wire bylines (AP and Reuters) are snagged by men, 31 percent by women; 63 percent of TV prime-time news broadcasts feature male anchors and correspondents; 37 percent feature women; 60 percent of online news is written by men, 40 percent by women; 59 percent of print news is written by men, 41 percent by women. (Women’s Media Center)

In news media: radio and television:

  • A record number of women are employed in TV news, including as news directors, but fewer women and people of color work in radio news. (Radio Television Digital News Association)
  • Women owned 7.4 percent of the nation’s commercial TV stations. (Federal Communications Commission)

In entertainment media: film, TV & online streaming:

  • Over 12 years, through 2018, men accounted for 93.4 percent, or, 654, of the 704 individual directors of the highest-grossing films. Women accounted for 6.6 percent, or, 46 of those 704. (University of Southern California’s Annenberg Inclusion Initiative)
  • The number of women working on-screen in television and online streaming entertainment shows declined 2 percentage points from 2016-17 to 2017-18, when 40 percent of all speaking characters were female and 60 percent were men. (San Diego State University’s Center for the Study of Women in Television & Film)
  • The share of women among nominees in the Oscars’ 19 non-acting categories rose slightly from 23 percent to 25 percent from 2018 to 2019, but women were shut out of nominations for cinematography, directing, editing, original score and visual effects. (Women’s Media Center)
  • The proportion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or queer regular (LGBTQ) characters cast during the 2018-19 broadcast TV season — 8.8 percent of 857 regular characters — was the highest tallied in 14 years. (Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation)

In tech, social media, gaming, engineering:

  • 45 percent of U.S. gamers were female, reflecting continued, year-over-year increases in female gamers. (Entertainment Software Association)
  • Over a decade, there was no significant rise in the number of female tech workers and Black tech workers. (U.S. Government Accountability Office)
  • 53 percent of women and 16 percent of men said they had been harassed at work. (Women Who Tech)

Click here to read the full report.

About The Women’s Media Center

The Women’s Media Center, founded by Jane Fonda, Robin Morgan, and Gloria Steinem, is an inclusive and feminist organization that works to make women visible and powerful in the media. We do so by promoting women as decision-makers and as subjects in media; training women to be effective in media; researching and exposing sexism and racism in media; and creating original online and on-air journalism.

RAJA KUMARI

Indian-American rapper, singer, songwriter and dancer Raja Kumari is a force of nature. She’s a fearless, charismatic personality and natural-born storyteller whose mission is to create art that blends her Indian roots with her American upbringing. Her music is a sonic bridge between East and West that fuses the rhythms she absorbed as a trained classical Indian dancer with her love for hip-hop. Through singles “Mute,” “City Slums” (featuring Mumbai rapper Divine), “Believe In You,” and her latest “I Did It,”as well as her debut EP, The Come Up (the cover features an image of Kumari with her head draped in both a gold tikka and an American flag), Kumari announces that this is the new face of America. “I want my fans to feel one hundred percent seen and to have a safe space to be themselves,” she says. “Because those were the onlydesires I had as a child.”

Born Svetha Rao in Claremont, Calif., to Indian parents who emigrated to the U.S. in the ’70s, Kumari was 13 when she had a vision that she calls “a memory of the future.” “I was in my room and I had this image of me standing on a stage,” she recalls. “I couldn’t see myself. I was looking out from my own eyes at a sea of 100,000 people and I could feel their energy. Suddenly I snapped out of it and said out loud, ‘How do I get there?’ My entire career has been about trying to answer that question, ‘How do I become that woman and how do I touch people?’ That became my life’s purpose.” Her answer is music and dance. “I feel like I’m a seed from the motherland that was sent across the world,” she says. “Culture is part of my identity because we, as Indian-Americans who grew up away from India, have to be the vessels of culture. We have to hold on because it’ll be lost within one generation. That’s why it so heavily influences my music and look. It’s not a gimmick to me. It’s an expression of a lifetime of trying to preserve it.”

Kumari set upon her artistic journey at age five when she began learning classical Indian dance, spending seven hours a day practicing with a dance guru who lived with her family for 10 years. Kumari studied several styles and, at age seven, made her debut in front of an audience that included Indian music legend Ravi Shankar, who declared her a child prodigy. By the time she was ten, Kumari was touring the U.S. and India, performing for massive audiences and raising substantial sums of money for charity, including enough to build a meditation hall and a new wing for a hospital in India.

Kumari listened to nothing but classical Indian music until she was nine, but then her older brother gave her a copy of The Fugees’ The Score, and her love for hip-hop was born. “That was the genesis of me as an artist,” she says. “Indian music is based on the mathematics of rhythm, so very quickly, as a little Indian kid who was not using her brain to be scientist, I used it to decipher the mathematics of hip-hop and realized that the rhythms of rap felt similar to the jathis and taals of Carnatic music. Hip-hop felt like a bridge.” Kumari also noted the large platforms that her favorite pop acts, like Britney Spears and *NSYNC, had to reach fans. “I was like, ‘How do I get my dance on that type of stage?’ And I realized that the only people who have stages like that are pop stars.”

At 14, Kumari recorded her first song professionally, started a hip-hop duo with a friend, and adopted her stage name, which means “princess” in Sanskrit. “That’s when I personified this strong, female goddess character called ‘Raja Kumari,’ the daughter of the king, and the king was God. So in my mind, I was the daughter of God.” She began writing her own songs as an act of rebellion. “I felt that everybody was expecting me to continue dancing and,like every other good Indian girl, marry a doctor,” saysKumari, whose father is a radiation oncologist. “I felt this path being set up for me and music became my way of doing something that was just for me.”

Kumari developed her writing skills and spent every day instudio sessions and attending songwriting camps all over the world. As she tried to crack the music industry code, she realized that the artists she looked up to started out as songwriters. “They had to prove they could sell millions of records, so that became my focus, too,” she says. “I put my artist project aside for two years to concentrate on learning.” As she found herself in in rooms with such heavyweights as Timbaland, Polow Da Don, Tricky Stewart, J.R. Rotem, and, at one point, Dr. Dre, Kumari soaked up everything she could about writing and vocal production. Her first placement came in 2012 when a song she co-wrote called “Change Your Life” wound up on Iggy Azalea’s Grammy-nominated album The New Classic. “Suddenly, I had credibility,” Kumari says.

Kumari signed with Pulse Recordings and went on to co-write hit songs for Fall Out Boy (the 4x-Platinum “Centuries,” which earned her a 2015 BMI Pop Award), Fifth Harmony, Twin Shadow, Knife Party, Dirty South, Lindsey Stirling, and Gwen Stefani (Kumari co-wrote six tracks on Stefani’s most recent album, This Is What The Truth Feels Like). Ironically, it was seeing Iggy Azalea wearing a gold kiritam in her “Bounce” video that fueledKumari’s determination to introduce authentic Indian culture to the masses. “To see my culture being put on as a costume — it woke me up,” she says. “I realized that if I didn’t do it, no one will.” Along the way, Kumari earned a degree in comparative religious studies at the University of California, Riverside.

In 2015, Kumari signed to Epic Records and released her debut single “Mute,” which addressed the challenges she faced when people in the industry advised her to tone down her ethnicity. (In the song’s opening line, she declares: “I had to put ‘em on mute / Thought that the curry was soup / I had to feed these fools / Had to go home and regroup.”)Kumari felt she had hit a roadblock in America and decided to decamp to Mumbai, where she was based for two years.

“I got there and everybody understood me,” says Kumari, who is also signed to Sony Music India. “I didn’t have to explain my bindi. I didn’t have to explain anything, really. People were so open to everything I was doing as an artist.I just wanted to prove that my music is worthy and that there are people who want to hear it. The validation from my people made me no longer crave validation from anyone else. When I walk into a room and someone tells me something can’t happen, I don’t even listen, because I already know what’s possible.”

Kumari wrote her latest single, “I Did It,” about that feeling. “It’s about me taking a leap,” she says. “It’s about how I didn’t do it the way everyone wanted, but I did it with integrity and that can’t be taken away from me. No one can tell me it won’t work, because it is working. I feel that the music is unstoppable now and that’s such a crazy feeling, because even today, my dad will say, ‘You know, you can just go back to medical school.’ They are still waiting for me to take the emergency exit. But I don’t feel like I’m allowed to quit because there are too many people, little girls like me, who didn’t see themselves represented in culture, who need it. I didn’t have anybody like me. I feel like I’m becoming the person I needed when I was growing up.